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squallypo

unnexpected power loss?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

 

 

is this something i should be concerned about? also i wanna know if the 97% health is fine as it is

thanks for taking your time on this.

 

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I see nothing wrong here. Looks fine.


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I generally trust the software to interpret the list and give out a "Healthy" or "Caution" warning, so I haven't paid too much attention to the unexpected power loss counter specifically, but I assume it does what it says on the tin and counts the number of times the drive has been powered off unexpectedly.  That would include forced shutdowns and reboots of your PC, for example during a BSOD, or (conceivably) the number of times it's been removed without "safely removing" if used externally over USB.  If you can imagine that the number it's showing lines up with events like this in the past, it's probably nothing to worry about.  However, if it seems dramatically higher than you would expect, it might be something to look into.

 

As for the life remaining, this is based (I believe) on the total TB written.  97% is of course still very high and nothing to be concerned about.  If you find it's dropping faster than you'd expect, look into things that could be causing a lot of unnecessary IO to the drive, like heavy use of the swap/page file, or frequent use of hibernation or hybrid sleep, etc.  I'm guessing that given the high max temperature, and ratio of hours on to power cycles, that this is a drive in a laptop.  If that's the case, what I said about sleep is even more likely to be the cause.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
7 hours ago, Ryan_Vickers said:

I generally trust the software to interpret the list and give out a "Healthy" or "Caution" warning, so I haven't paid too much attention to the unexpected power loss counter specifically, but I assume it does what it says on the tin and counts the number of times the drive has been powered off unexpectedly.  That would include forced shutdowns and reboots of your PC, for example during a BSOD, or (conceivably) the number of times it's been removed without "safely removing" if used externally over USB.  If you can imagine that the number it's showing lines up with events like this in the past, it's probably nothing to worry about.  However, if it seems dramatically higher than you would expect, it might be something to look into.

 

As for the life remaining, this is based (I believe) on the total TB written.  97% is of course still very high and nothing to be concerned about.  If you find it's dropping faster than you'd expect, look into things that could be causing a lot of unnecessary IO to the drive, like heavy use of the swap/page file, or frequent use of hibernation or hybrid sleep, etc.  I'm guessing that given the high max temperature, and ratio of hours on to power cycles, that this is a drive in a laptop.  If that's the case, what I said about sleep is even more likely to be the cause.

interesting reply thank you so much now to clarify some things:

 

i have disabled hibernation/sleep mode

1-its on a desktop pc.

2-the only time ive "moved" the ssd without disconnecting it is when im cleaing the case since the ssd is not on a enclosure device.

3-as far im aware ivent got any BSOD so far so thats why im wondering why it shows the "unnexpected power loss"

4- i have on the power options the HDD to never turn off (0 minutes)

 

its running under performance mode all the time.

idk about the page file situation that you mentioned.

 

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17 hours ago, squallypo said:

interesting reply thank you so much now to clarify some things:

 

i have disabled hibernation/sleep mode

1-its on a desktop pc.

2-the only time ive "moved" the ssd without disconnecting it is when im cleaing the case since the ssd is not on a enclosure device.

3-as far im aware ivent got any BSOD so far so thats why im wondering why it shows the "unnexpected power loss"

4- i have on the power options the HDD to never turn off (0 minutes)

 

its running under performance mode all the time.

idk about the page file situation that you mentioned.

 

Very interesting, thanks for the details.  You can check your pagefile settings by opening This PC > Properties > Advanced System Settings > Advanced (tab) > Performance (section) > "Settings..." > Advanced (tab) > Virtual Memory (section) > "Change..." (my god I just realized how many levels deep this is buried lol).  Having it on the SSD is optimal for performance but will eventually lead to higher wear levels, particularly if you operate with your RAM nearly full most of the time.

 

I just had a look at my own drive out of curiosity and it reports 0 as the unexpected power loss count, which I find very interesting because I know for a fact that I've had many crashes and improper reboots, so if that isn't what triggers it (evidently), now I'm really wondering what does.  I did some looking and it appears to be similar to what I said above, but with some added caveats.  It sounds to me like it only counts an event if it was in the middle of trying to write something when power was lost.  If it's able to handle the situation, either through internal power backup, not actually losing power at all even given a reboot, or simply by not being busy in that moment, it wouldn't record an event.

 

Given that new insight, I can't imagine why your drive would be reporting 9 events.  If my system with all the crashes it's been through hasn't triggered one, yours, with what sounds like has been a more stable life, definitely shouldn't have.  With that said, simply having that number isn't inherently bad as far as I know.  I would recommend keeping an eye on it, maybe just check it once a month or something.  If it continues going up, then something is likely wrong and deserves further investigation, but if it hold steady, I wouldn't concern myself with it.  While it does seemingly indicate a problem, I can't imagine why or how it happened, and if you aren't experiencing any issues (system instability, data loss, etc.) then there isn't much reason to look into it in my opinion.


Solve your own audio issues  |  First Steps with RPi 3  |  Humidity & Condensation  |  Sleep & Hibernation  |  Overclocking RAM  |  Making Backups  |  Displays  |  4K / 8K / 16K / etc.  |  Do I need 80+ Platinum?

If you can read this you're using the wrong theme.  You can change it at the bottom.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 8/12/2020 at 1:46 PM, Ryan_Vickers said:

Very interesting, thanks for the details.  You can check your pagefile settings by opening This PC > Properties > Advanced System Settings > Advanced (tab) > Performance (section) > "Settings..." > Advanced (tab) > Virtual Memory (section) > "Change..." (my god I just realized how many levels deep this is buried lol).  Having it on the SSD is optimal for performance but will eventually lead to higher wear levels, particularly if you operate with your RAM nearly full most of the time.

 

I just had a look at my own drive out of curiosity and it reports 0 as the unexpected power loss count, which I find very interesting because I know for a fact that I've had many crashes and improper reboots, so if that isn't what triggers it (evidently), now I'm really wondering what does.  I did some looking and it appears to be similar to what I said above, but with some added caveats.  It sounds to me like it only counts an event if it was in the middle of trying to write something when power was lost.  If it's able to handle the situation, either through internal power backup, not actually losing power at all even given a reboot, or simply by not being busy in that moment, it wouldn't record an event.

 

Given that new insight, I can't imagine why your drive would be reporting 9 events.  If my system with all the crashes it's been through hasn't triggered one, yours, with what sounds like has been a more stable life, definitely shouldn't have.  With that said, simply having that number isn't inherently bad as far as I know.  I would recommend keeping an eye on it, maybe just check it once a month or something.  If it continues going up, then something is likely wrong and deserves further investigation, but if it hold steady, I wouldn't concern myself with it.  While it does seemingly indicate a problem, I can't imagine why or how it happened, and if you aren't experiencing any issues (system instability, data loss, etc.) then there isn't much reason to look into it in my opinion.

yeah i got 10 now, but this one was because there was an actual power loss in the house (no ups on my system and yes i know i should have one) but nothing else, so yeah i wonder whats up with the 9  power loss counts but as you say it may be nothing tbh, i appreciate your reply, also i do have virtual memmory on my SSD, but its managed automatically i havent changed any information in it.

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