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Hz Eurythmic

rgb strip has 3 pin connector but the 4 pin rgb cord has 4 pin strip connector

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I just received the Alitove rgb led strips in the mail and i plugged my 4 pin rgb connector in my 4 pin rgb header on my mobo. i realized that the rgb strips has some 3 pin connector but the other end of the 4 pin rgb connector has some 4 pin connector for the strips. how do i connect my rgb strips??

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19 minutes ago, Hz Eurythmic said:

how do i connect my rgb strips??

There are 2 standards of RGB header: one with three pins and the other with four. I think you got the wrong strips for your mobo


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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, Mad153 said:

There are 2 standards of RGB header: one with three pins and the other with four. I think you got the wrong strips for your mobo

i am completely aware of that. i said that i connected the 4 pin rgb connector the 4 pin header in my mobo

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So the setup is this?

 

=====strip====3pin <--> 4pin========cable=====4pin <--> motherboard

 

In that case you'd want to use the 3pin connector on your motherboard.

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You might want to check the specs of the RGB strip you bought and the RBG header on your motherboard. There is a high chance they are not directly compatible. This is what i found on the net regarding 3 pin and 4 pin RBG headers

 

Quote

3-pin and 4-pin RGB headers are in no way compatible. You would need a controller to translate between these.

Generally 4-pin is 12V RGB and has a voltage pin for each red, blue, and green, plus one for ground. 3-pin is 5V Addressable RGB (also called ARGB, or DRGB for Digital RGB) and has a 5V “power” pin, a data pin, and a ground pin.

Not only is the voltage different (and not directly compatible) but the way the colors are controlled is very different. The LEDs in a 12V are all connected to the same lines so each and every LED on that strip is always the same color. The 5V Addressable system actually sends a data stream (a bunch of 1’s and 0’s) along the data pin that represents what each individual LED should do. The first line grabs the first bunch of data and passes the rest along to the next LED, and so on.

 

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