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probablydumb

45C Liquid temp on Kraken X53

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Alright so i bought a new cooler the NZXT Kraken x53 and i realized whenever i open my pc the liquid temp sits at about 30-35c and my cpu temp at about 45c.But whenever i open up a game as an example dead by daylight cpu temp stays at about 52-53c but the liquid temp jumps all the way to 45-47c.And whenever i close the game the liquid temp doesn't go down at all.And i have a problem where NZXT Cam doesn't see my fans.So i have to apply a fan curve in the bios.

Are these liquid temps normal and what can i do to lower them? 

PC Specs:
Case:NJOY Vanguard with custom RGB Fans
Processor: AMD Ryzen 5 3600X (4.4GHZ)
Graphics Card: MSI GAMING X TRIO RTX 2080S (8GB DDR6)
RAM: 16GB (15.96 Usable) Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO
Power Supply: Corsair CX750 (750W)
HDD: 1 TB WD Blue
SSD: 240GB Kingston A400
Motherboard: ASUS TUF B450M PLUS GAMING
 

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Water holds a lot of energy. Raising 1kg of water 1C takes a little over 4kJ of energy. So if you put in a ton of energy into the water to play a game, it's going to take a min to get all of that energy back out. It's like driving a semi truck: It takes a long time to get up to speed (up to temperature) and then a long time to come to a stop (back to idle temperature). In addition, everything else in your loop, like the big heavy hunk of metal that is the radiator, is also at the 47C or whatever during load and also has to release the energy that was imparted into it during the CPU load. Your fans blowing over the fins of the radiator is what exchanges this heat from water to metal to air. This takes time, just as it takes time for the water temp to rise, but I bet you aren't watching that too closely in a game. If you want to speed it up and get water temps down, turn your fans up. That moves more air over the radiator which increases the amount of energy dissipated from the water. As long as your water temps are under boiling, I wouldn't worry about it too much. If your water temps are at (or anywhere near, let's be real) boiling, I'm sure you have bigger problems to do with. Just pay attention to your CPU temps, as long as those are acceptable you're fine.


ASU

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Hackentosher said:

Water holds a lot of energy. Raising 1kg of water 1C takes a little over 4kJ of energy. So if you put in a ton of energy into the water to play a game, it's going to take a min to get all of that energy back out. It's like driving a semi truck: It takes a long time to get up to speed (up to temperature) and then a long time to come to a stop (back to idle temperature). In addition, everything else in your loop, like the big heavy hunk of metal that is the radiator, is also at the 47C or whatever during load and also has to release the energy that was imparted into it during the CPU load. Your fans blowing over the fins of the radiator is what exchanges this heat from water to metal to air. This takes time, just as it takes time for the water temp to rise, but I bet you aren't watching that too closely in a game. If you want to speed it up and get water temps down, turn your fans up. That moves more air over the radiator which increases the amount of energy dissipated from the water. As long as your water temps are under boiling, I wouldn't worry about it too much. If your water temps are at (or anywhere near, let's be real) boiling, I'm sure you have bigger problems to do with. Just pay attention to your CPU temps, as long as those are acceptable you're fine.

Alright thanks for the info.10 mins after closing the game the liquid temp went down 4c so i do agree with what you are saying.As of my knowledge the boiling point of water is 100C.Im sure that if it got even 30c near that i would have a pretty big problem on my hands.Im gonna go run a firestrike stress test.And im gonna see what the liquid temps are at together with the cpu temps.Im gonna come back to tell you if it went higher than 47c or it stayed the same

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5 minutes ago, probablydumb said:

Alright thanks for the info.10 mins after closing the game the liquid temp went down 4c so i do agree with what you are saying.As of my knowledge the boiling point of water is 100C.Im sure that if it got even 30c near that i would have a pretty big problem on my hands.Im gonna go run a firestrike stress test.And im gonna see what the liquid temps are at together with the cpu temps.Im gonna come back to tell you if it went higher than 47c or it stayed the same

So your system is essentially going to have two equilibrium points. One under load, where the liquid temperature and the CPU temperature will stabilize at their respective values, and another at idle. Once the equilibrium point is reached, the energy dissipated by your radiator is equal to the energy being emitted by your CPU because the temperature is no longer changing. TBH if my CPU is at a stable 70C or lower under load, I am a happy man.


ASU

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Hackentosher said:

So your system is essentially going to have two equilibrium points. One under load, where the liquid temperature and the CPU temperature will stabilize at their respective values, and another at idle. Once the equilibrium point is reached, the energy dissipated by your radiator is equal to the energy being emitted by your CPU because the temperature is no longer changing. TBH if my CPU is at a stable 70C or lower under load, I am a happy man.

Alright so the max cpu temp was 70c.And liquid temp was 58c max.What do you say?

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6 minutes ago, probablydumb said:

Alright so the max cpu temp was 70c.And liquid temp was 58c max.What do you say?

Yeah I mean that seems fine to me. It's not melting and or boiling so that would be fine if it was my machine.


ASU

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Posted · Original PosterOP
3 minutes ago, Hackentosher said:

Yeah I mean that seems fine to me. It's not melting and or boiling so that would be fine if it was my machine.

Alright bro thanks for the help have a good one and stay safe 😊

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Though those temps seem high to us, they are pretty typical for CPUs to run at. Don't worry about it unless you messed up some thermal paste or something. If things are getting too hot the PC will either shut down immediately or the fans will start going insane -- giving you a warning that somethings probably wrong. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
5 hours ago, kwiksilver said:

Though those temps seem high to us, they are pretty typical for CPUs to run at. Don't worry about it unless you messed up some thermal paste or something. If things are getting too hot the PC will either shut down immediately or the fans will start going insane -- giving you a warning that somethings probably wrong. 

I was just worried that the liquid temp was really high not my normal cpu temps

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14 minutes ago, probablydumb said:

I was just worried that the liquid temp was really high not my normal cpu temps

Asetek pumps can safely operate at under 60 degrees fluid temperature, so you are close, but still borderline okay. I would raise the fan speed ever so slightly.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
14 minutes ago, For Science! said:

Asetek pumps can safely operate at under 60 degrees fluid temperature, so you are close, but still borderline okay. I would raise the fan speed ever so slightly.

What does safely operate mean?

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1 hour ago, probablydumb said:

What does safely operate mean?

It means that mean time to failure was validated for at least that temperature. Any higher and you are "shortening the lifetime of the pump" in the sense that a pump would be rated for X hours of continuous operation, and if you exceed the rated temperature then the mean time until failure is shortened.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
4 hours ago, For Science! said:

It means that mean time to failure was validated for at least that temperature. Any higher and you are "shortening the lifetime of the pump" in the sense that a pump would be rated for X hours of continuous operation, and if you exceed the rated temperature then the mean time until failure is shortened.

so safely operate means that its life could be shortened if it performs constantly at a higher than 60c temperature.Not explode in the middle of me playing or start to melt?

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1 hour ago, probablydumb said:

so safely operate means that its life could be shortened if it performs constantly at a higher than 60c temperature.Not explode in the middle of me playing or start to melt?

Yes, so worst case it will just stop working.

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