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Duranson

Smaller, more minimal cases that can fit at least dual 360mm rads?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Are there any cases that are on the smaller side, and are more minimal looking, tempered glass doesn't matter, that can fit at least dual 360mm rads? Preferably more, but at least that. And obviously I mean smaller within reason, I know you can't get super small when you want to fit in rads like that. Thanks!

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I can't see that working in anything smaller than a mid tower ATX. I have a Meshify C, which is about as small as you can go with ATX, and I'd only be able to do a 280 rad up top and a 360 rad up front, if I had a short graphics card and ate into the drive cage area in the PSU shroud.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
3 minutes ago, Chris Pratt said:

I can't see that working in anything smaller than a mid tower ATX. I have a Meshify C, which is about as small as you can go with ATX, and I'd only be able to do a 280 rad up top and a 360 rad up front, if I had a short graphics card and ate into the drive cage area in the PSU shroud.

Yeah. I wasn't necessarily thinking about anything smaller than an ATX mid tower, but I just meant what are the smaller Mid and Full tower ATX cases that could fit dual 360 rads.

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5 minutes ago, Chris Pratt said:

I can't see that working in anything smaller than a mid tower ATX. I have a Meshify C, which is about as small as you can go with ATX, and I'd only be able to do a 280 rad up top and a 360 rad up front, if I had a short graphics card and ate into the drive cage area in the PSU shroud.

280 on the top would be pretty brutal for the majority (perhaps all?) of motherboards and memory kit, see picture below for a 240 mm radiator (30 mm) + 25 mm fan. With a 280 you'd definitely hit the RAM in my case, and most probably the VRM heatsink too.

 

For standard layout, Meshify S2 would be suitable for watercooling.

IMG_9182.jpg.de3bd9775765c9cda7b79a6d9f738dab.jpg

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1 minute ago, Duranson said:

Yeah. I wasn't necessarily thinking about anything smaller than an ATX mid tower, but I just meant what are the smaller Mid and Full tower ATX cases that could fit dual 360 rads.

Well, you're technically already defining the dimensions of the case. At the bare minimum, it would have to be around 400mm x 400mm x 160mm, which is a pretty big case. Not huge, but not exactly svelte.

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
5 minutes ago, For Science! said:

280 on the top would be pretty brutal the majority (perhaps all?) of motherboards and memory kit, see picture below for a 240 mm radiator (30 mm) + 25 mm fan. With a 280 you'd definitely hit the RAM in my case, and most probably the VRM heatsink too.

 

For standard layout, Meshify S2 would be suitable for watercooling.

IMG_9182.jpg.de3bd9775765c9cda7b79a6d9f738dab.jpg

Could a meshify S2 fit dual 360mm rads + a 140? On EKWB's website it looks like that, but I'm not sure.

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140 on the bottom, then yes. I think the rear is only 120. Though I typically don't populate rear and bottom with radiators.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, For Science! said:

Though I typically don't populate rear and bottom with radiators.

How come?

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3 minutes ago, Duranson said:

Could a meshify S2 fit dual 360mm rads + a 140? On EKWB's website it looks like that, but I'm not sure.

From the product page:

 

Quote

Support for radiators up to 420 mm in the top, 360 mm in front, and 280 mm in the base

 

 

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1 minute ago, Duranson said:

How come?

Personal preference for certain airflow paths, as well as considerations for cable management around the PSU area.

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2 minutes ago, Chris Pratt said:

From the product page:

Yes, but be careful that you can't do all of that at the same time. 420 use means that you can't use a 360, etc. Read the product manual for more information.

 

Page 22

https://www.fractal-design.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Meshify-S2-manual-7.25-MB.pdf

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Posted · Original PosterOP
10 minutes ago, For Science! said:

Yes, but be careful that you can't do all of that at the same time. 420 use means that you can't use a 360, etc. Read the product manual for more information.

 

Page 22

https://www.fractal-design.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Meshify-S2-manual-7.25-MB.pdf

Would this setup work out, if I want to max overclock both my 3950x and 2080ti? And I know I also need to get hardline tubing. Is there anything else that I would need to get, and would this setup work? Thanks! https://www.ekwb.com/custom-loop-configurator/shared/oW5f0c178bdc5ab

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1 minute ago, Duranson said:

Would this setup work out, if I want to max overclock both my 3950x and 2080ti? And I know I also need to get hardline tubing. Is there anything else that I would need to get, and would this setup work? Thanks! https://www.ekwb.com/custom-loop-configurator/shared/oW5f0c178bdc5ab

I've already answered this previously, so I just paste my answer from before. But now I change my answer with regards to the radiator

 

- SE radiators are bottom of the barrel, you aren't getting PE radiators, don't get them from EKWB. Get HWLabs GTS instead.

- SPC pump is kind of low end, I would recommend getting a D5 for this kind of loop, you may have to shorten your reservoir to fit too.

- If hardlining, you probably need at least a couple of angled fittings

- You also need components for a drain port.

- If you go with D5 pump, pump testing adaptor is unneeded.

 

Max overclock is a duff term since no, to get the max overclock you need liquid nitrogen. You will be able to overclock until where the temperature will limit you.

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