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sudo chown -R $USER /usr/share/gnome-shell/extensions

otherwise

sudo nautilus /usr/share/gnome-shell/extensions

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7 minutes ago, Joe Jackman said:

-snip-

Owner: root.

 

If you need to change permissions, you can do so as root with chmod, or change the folder owner as root with chown.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
6 minutes ago, svmlegacy said:

Owner: root.

 

If you need to change permissions, you can do so as root with chmod, or change the folder owner as root with chown.

i need to edit the scripts there so ig i need to change the owner... now how to do it? very noob with linux

 

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1 minute ago, Joe Jackman said:

i need to edit the scripts there so ig i need to change the owner... now how to do it? very noob with linux

 

HowToGeek has a good article on using the chown command on Linux, however, be warned that changing ownership or permissions of a file may render any programs or services that depend on said file completely broken, or worse, your system may not boot.

https://www.howtogeek.com/438435/how-to-use-the-chown-command-on-linux


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A normal Linux installation has a root account (similar to the administrator in Windows) and a number of user accounts. In modern Linux system you can act as root (equivalent to "Run as Administrator..." in Windows) via the sudo command. In this case 

sudo <File Manager Program>

you can also chown to your unprivileged user account, but I wouldn't recommend it, as it can cause problems.

 

Your file manager program may have a way to become root without you having to open the command line (or it may not).

 

Unfortunately, as I don't use PopOS, I can't tell you if it does or what the File Manager Program is called for you to be able to use it like I showed you. Hopefully someone who does can help.


The Eight Fallacies of Distributed Computing

Essentially everyone, when they first build a distributed application, makes the following eight assumptions. All prove to be false in the long run and all cause big trouble and painful learning experiences.

  1. The network is reliable
  2. Latency is zero
  3. Bandwidth is infinite
  4. The network is secure
  5. Topology doesn’t change
  6. There is one administrator
  7. Transport cost is zero
  8. The network is homogeneous

        — Peter Deutsch

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Posted · Original PosterOP
17 minutes ago, vlads_ said:

A normal Linux installation has a root account (similar to the administrator in Windows) and a number of user accounts. In modern Linux system you can act as root (equivalent to "Run as Administrator..." in Windows) via the sudo command. In this case 


sudo <File Manager Program>

you can also chown to your unprivileged user account, but I wouldn't recommend it, as it can cause problems.

 

Your file manager program may have a way to become root without you having to open the command line (or it may not).

 

Unfortunately, as I don't use PopOS, I can't tell you if it does or what the File Manager Program is called for you to be able to use it like I showed you. Hopefully someone who does can help.

i believe its gnome files, it directs me there so i guess thats itimage.thumb.png.d58572b81bc874e26dd9cb4cee2b2c2c.png

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, Joe Jackman said:

i believe its gnome files, it directs me there so i guess thats itimage.thumb.png.d58572b81bc874e26dd9cb4cee2b2c2c.png

 

image.png

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2 minutes ago, Joe Jackman said:

i believe its gnome files, it directs me there so i guess thats it

Try

sudo nautilus /

from the command line


The Eight Fallacies of Distributed Computing

Essentially everyone, when they first build a distributed application, makes the following eight assumptions. All prove to be false in the long run and all cause big trouble and painful learning experiences.

  1. The network is reliable
  2. Latency is zero
  3. Bandwidth is infinite
  4. The network is secure
  5. Topology doesn’t change
  6. There is one administrator
  7. Transport cost is zero
  8. The network is homogeneous

        — Peter Deutsch

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Posted · Best Answer

sudo chown -R $USER /usr/share/gnome-shell/extensions

otherwise

sudo nautilus /usr/share/gnome-shell/extensions


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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, vlads_ said:

Try


sudo nautilus /

from the command line

ya thats the name, how did i forget it

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
26 minutes ago, vlads_ said:

A normal Linux installation has a root account (similar to the administrator in Windows) and a number of user accounts. In modern Linux system you can act as root (equivalent to "Run as Administrator..." in Windows) via the sudo command. In this case 


sudo <File Manager Program>

you can also chown to your unprivileged user account, but I wouldn't recommend it, as it can cause problems.

 

Your file manager program may have a way to become root without you having to open the command line (or it may not).

 

Unfortunately, as I don't use PopOS, I can't tell you if it does or what the File Manager Program is called for you to be able to use it like I showed you. Hopefully someone who does can help.

Yes, thank you for the heads up. i think its best not to dwell on (not so) advance stuff so early.

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Just now, Joe Jackman said:

Yes, thank you for the heads up. i think its best not to dwell on (not so) advance stuff so early

It's not advanced, it's just: there are system files (which you can only touch as root) and user files. And chown basically transforms system files into user files. Which solves your problems but it may not necessarily be a good idea... Imagine if any program could modify system32 in Windows :).


The Eight Fallacies of Distributed Computing

Essentially everyone, when they first build a distributed application, makes the following eight assumptions. All prove to be false in the long run and all cause big trouble and painful learning experiences.

  1. The network is reliable
  2. Latency is zero
  3. Bandwidth is infinite
  4. The network is secure
  5. Topology doesn’t change
  6. There is one administrator
  7. Transport cost is zero
  8. The network is homogeneous

        — Peter Deutsch

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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, vlads_ said:

It's not advanced, it's just: there are system files (which you can only touch as root) and user files. And chown basically transforms system files into user files. Which solves your problems but it may not necessarily be a good idea... Imagine if any program could modify system32 in Windows :).

if u can see the other posts, you will get where i am coming from. i have no idea how it happened and now ended up reinstalling the OS though deleting the volume.

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3 hours ago, Joe Jackman said:

i need to edit the scripts there so ig i need to change the owner... now how to do it? very noob with linux

 

If you're only editing scripts, the easiest way to go about this in linux, is to edit the files directly as the (root) owner. In this case, you /could/ use "sudo nano <your file>" within a terminal to directly edit it as root. Be very careful on which files you choose to use this power with, as you effectively can do anything you want without warning. This can easily lead to... bad things, if you aren't 100% certain. The more you use Linux, the more familiar and comfortable this will be.


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Server: Intel Xeon X5670, 60 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3-R Ubuntu Server 20.04.1 LTS x86_64

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