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Re0

OC editon gpu vs OCed gpu

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Let's say I got an 2070 Super and I overclocked it would that mean it would be the exact same as the OC edtion of the 2070 Super?

For example I overclocked a ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming would it be the exact same as a ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming OC Edition?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

oh yeah and can you also overclock the oc edition GPU any further?

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8 minutes ago, Re0 said:

Let's say I got an 2070 Super and I overclocked it would that mean it would be the exact same as the OC edtion of the 2070 Super?

For example I overclocked a ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming would it be the exact same as a ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming OC Edition?

Not exactly.

 

The cooler on a device is assumed to support the thermal output of the factory OC'd device. If you use a customer cooler on the same chip, you can get the same performance. However in general, factory OC'd boards are the first to die when new games come out that use things that benchmarks don't test for, (such as how many GPU's exploded and died with FFXIV, FFXV and Neir Automata), and people who have OC'd the parts themselves are more likely to damage the parts from being too aggressive about it.

 

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30 minutes ago, Re0 said:

Let's say I got an 2070 Super and I overclocked it would that mean it would be the exact same as the OC edtion of the 2070 Super?

For example I overclocked a ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming would it be the exact same as a ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2070 Super Gaming OC Edition?

As far as I know, once you manually overclock them all Turing cards of the same model tend to perform pretty closely to each other provided they have adequate cooling, unless we're getting into modding the bios in conjunction with exotic cooling solutions such as sub zero cooling etc. I have no experience with either card but I'd wager the cooling will probably be good enough on both cards, to get the best performance out of the standard bios, though you might have to adjust the fan curve a bit.

I also doubt that ASUS is binning their cards so it will probably be more about luck when it comes to which one will be faster when you manually overclock, and even if not, as I said most Turing cars tend to overclock fairly similarly. 


PC:    CPU: Threadripper 2950x @4.25Ghz  GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1080 SLI   I   COOLING: Noctua NH-U14S TR4-SP3   I   RAM: 32GB 3200Mhz   I   

SSD: 2.5TB NVME; 1.5TB SATA   I   HDD: 12TB (3x4TB WD) I   PSU: Bequiet Straight Power 11 1000W   I    Case: Cooler Master H500 Mesh

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25 minutes ago, Kisai said:

Not exactly.

 

The cooler on a device is assumed to support the thermal output of the factory OC'd device. If you use a customer cooler on the same chip, you can get the same performance. However in general, factory OC'd boards are the first to die when new games come out that use things that benchmarks don't test for, (such as how many GPU's exploded and died with FFXIV, FFXV and Neir Automata), and people who have OC'd the parts themselves are more likely to damage the parts from being too aggressive about it.

 

As far as I know the overclocking options on modern NVIDIA cards are pretty conservative and aren't gonna allow you to go too far out of spec anyway, so I would be surprised if overclocking played a significant role in damaging a card. I mean you can always find a way around such limitations, but at that point you should probably know what you're doing.


PC:    CPU: Threadripper 2950x @4.25Ghz  GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1080 SLI   I   COOLING: Noctua NH-U14S TR4-SP3   I   RAM: 32GB 3200Mhz   I   

SSD: 2.5TB NVME; 1.5TB SATA   I   HDD: 12TB (3x4TB WD) I   PSU: Bequiet Straight Power 11 1000W   I    Case: Cooler Master H500 Mesh

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