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Satty_83

Dual Band Router

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I have a fibre broadband with single band router. The router is placed in the last room and I work from the room next to it. Before Noon time, the internet speed is quite decent over wifi like 25 mbps and sometimes 40mbps, but then towards the afternoon the speeds drop to even 2-3 mbps, if I move closer to router and plug in the LAN, the speeds go-up to 50 mbps i.e. the plan limit.

The service provider says to upgrade to dual band router, but i somehow feel it is lack due to more users on the network that are choking speed, and nothing to do with dual or single band router.

 

Thoughts and suggestions.

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You are prob in an area with alot of wifi around you. So when those channels get used your wifi will also drop.

Hence why wired there is no problem.

Its best to let the ISP router be and get a good Access point thats wired to the router and let it handle the wifi

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9 minutes ago, Dujith said:

You are prob in an area with alot of wifi around you. So when those channels get used your wifi will also drop.

Hence why wired there is no problem.

Its best to let the ISP router be and get a good Access point thats wired to the router and let it handle the wifi

That is a good idea but if the ISP router is a 2.4 ghz wouldn't the AP also transmit in 2.4 ghz and cause interference? 

I happen to agree with the ISP. 

If you get a dual band router the 5GHZ band has a lot more channels and a lot less interference. 

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18 minutes ago, tobeornottobealttfan said:

That is a good idea but if the ISP router is a 2.4 ghz wouldn't the AP also transmit in 2.4 ghz and cause interference? 

I happen to agree with the ISP. 

If you get a dual band router the 5GHZ band has a lot more channels and a lot less interference. 

You would disable the wifi on the router. And without any further info i am going on the experience that the router is usually located near the utility box at the side of the house.

So an AP in the middle of the house would be a better solution. Plus 5Ghz is better speed wise but alot worse signal wise through a few walls.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

So dual band it is then,... thanks guys... 

how about tplink c50 dial band router?

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1 hour ago, Satty_83 said:

So dual band it is then,... thanks guys... 

how about tplink c50 dial band router?

What you describe is typical of peak consumption on a congested 2.4GHz band. You would benefit from a wireless router that supports 5GHz (WiFi 5 or better).

 

Need some more information:

  1. What speed package do you get from your ISP?
  2. What is your budget?
  3. Where are you located? Do you have the ability to shop on popular online websites?
  4. Do you just need WiFi coverage to your room only? How much square footage of coverage do you need?
  5. Are you absolutely opposed to running gigabit ethernet?

The TP-Link C50 only supports 10/100Mbps speeds on all ethernet ports which will limit your maximum internet connection speed if your ISP is selling your speeds beyond 100Mbps. Plus, it doesn't explicitly state that it has MU-MIMO, which is going to be helpful when you have multiple clients connecting at the same time.

 

2 hours ago, tobeornottobealttfan said:

That is a good idea but if the ISP router is a 2.4 ghz wouldn't the AP also transmit in 2.4 ghz and cause interference? 

I happen to agree with the ISP.

No. Just disable the ISP gateway's WiFi.

 

2 hours ago, tobeornottobealttfan said:

If you get a dual band router the 5GHZ band has a lot more channels and a lot less interference. 

...Provided the neighbours are not saturating that band as well. A 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless survey would help in determining this.

 

Higher frequencies are more likely to be subject to interference than lower frequencies. That's why long range WiFi tends to use 900MHz, 2.4GHz, 3GHz, etc. But if you have devices around your house using these lower frequencies (e.g. wireless phones, microwaves, other sources of EMI), then they'll affect your low frequencies as well.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
22 minutes ago, Falcon1986 said:

What you describe is typical of peak consumption on a congested 2.4GHz band. You would benefit from a wireless router that supports 5GHz (WiFi 5 or better).

 

Need some more information:

  1. What speed package do you get from your ISP?  <Satty> 50 mbps
  2. What is your budget? <Satty> 30- 40 dollars, 
  3. Where are you located? Do you have the ability to shop on popular online websites? I am in India
  4. Do you just need WiFi coverage to your room only? How much square footage of coverage do you need? I need a coverage of 150 sq meters
  5. Are you absolutely opposed to running gigabit ethernet? I do not get gigabit speeds, and have no use for it. 3 devices in totol, including TV, laptop and mobile phone. 

The TP-Link C50 only supports 10/100Mbps speeds on all ethernet ports which will limit your maximum internet connection speed if your ISP is selling your speeds beyond 100Mbps. Plus, it doesn't explicitly state that it has MU-MIMO, which is going to be helpful when you have multiple clients connecting at the same time.

 

No. Just disable the ISP gateway's WiFi.

 

...Provided the neighbours are not saturating that band as well. A 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless survey would help in determining this.

 

Higher frequencies are more likely to be subject to interference than lower frequencies. That's why long range WiFi tends to use 900MHz, 2.4GHz, 3GHz, etc. But if you have devices around your house using these lower frequencies (e.g. wireless phones, microwaves, other sources of EMI), then they'll affect your low frequencies as well.

 

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@Satty_83

 

The more devices you place on ethernet, the better your overall experience will be. That means 1 less device competing for WiFi airspace that your other devices could be using. If your TV has an ethernet port, wiring it to the router will remove it from accessing the 2.4GHz spectrum.

 

For a maximum of 50Mbps and at that budget, I would go for the Archer C60 instead only because it has MU-MIMO. The ports are still 100Mbps maximum, but you shouldn't be able to saturate the connection with just 3 devices anyway.

 

When you get the new wireless router, disable any WiFi on your ISP modem/gateway (if it has WiFi) and use the wireless router's instead. Also, ensure there's only 1 NAT device (ISP device or your wireless modem). And run a 2.4GHz/5GHz wireless survey before assigning your broadcast radio channels so you can utilize a space that isn't crowded. My personal preference is to give separate SSIDs to each radio so I can preferentially push them to the 5GHz instead of letting them choose on a "same-SSID" setup.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
13 minutes ago, Falcon1986 said:

@Satty_83

 

The more devices you place on ethernet, the better your overall experience will be. That means 1 less device competing for WiFi airspace that your other devices could be using. If your TV has an ethernet port, wiring it to the router will remove it from accessing the 2.4GHz spectrum.

 

For a maximum of 50Mbps and at that budget, I would go for the Archer C60 instead only because it has MU-MIMO. The ports are still 100Mbps maximum, but you shouldn't be able to saturate the connection with just 3 devices anyway.

 

When you get the new wireless router, disable any WiFi on your ISP modem/gateway (if it has WiFi) and use the wireless router's instead. Also, ensure there's only 1 NAT device (ISP device or your wireless modem). And run a 2.4GHz/5GHz wireless survey before assigning your broadcast radio channels so you can utilize a space that isn't crowded. My personal preference is to give separate SSIDs to each radio so I can preferentially push them to the 5GHz instead of letting them choose on a "same-SSID" setup.

That is so detailed and great answer. Thank you much, cheers!

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