Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

No, it's BGA. Also an 6th gen i7 is 2c 4t just like the i5 so it wouldn't make that much of a difference even if it was possible. 

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

I am currently using laptop with HP  8136 PFJEAE21V9GKBB  31.43 motherboard....It has 8 gb of ddr3 RAM with core i5 6th Gen. processor. Is it possible to upgrade the processor to core i7 6 generation ? I am really thinking about to changing a processor in my laptop but I am not getting needed information about processors and upgrades supported by my HP Pavillion motherboard. My bios serial number is CND53897D4. 

 

image.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Upgrading CPUs in laptops often isn't possible, do your research and check if you can upgrade the CPU in your laptop. Upgrading ram, and storage is however probably possible.

 

Btw, it is probably DDR4.


Just a kinda normal a 15 year old kid.

Internet: 1Gbps/1Gbps Bahnhof.

 

Workstation: Dell XPS 9570, Ubuntu 19.04 with Budgie VM, I7-8750H, 16GB RAM, 1TB NVME, Dell Thunderbolt dock.

Gaming Machine: R7 1800X @ 3.8GHz, 32GB DDR4 @ 3200MHz, RTX 2070, 1TB NVME, GB B450 MB, Windows 10

 

Storage Server: Supermirco X11SDV-4C-TP8F, Xeon D-2123IT, 64GB @ 2600MHz, Ubuntu 18.04, 8x6TB RAIDz2, Quadro P2000

Backup: Synology 4bay, 4x4TB SHR.

Backup off-site (Grandma): Synogloy 2bay, 2x3TB RAID0, 100Mbps/100Mbps.

 

Proxmox Node1: Xeon Silver 4212 10Core, 96GB DDR4 @ 2400Mhz, 2x1TB RAIDz1 VM, 4x2TB Ceph, Tesla T4.

Proxmox Node2: Xeon Silver 4212 10Core, 96GB DDR4 @ 2400Mhz, 2x1TB RAIDz1 VM, 4x2TB Ceph.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure it's soldered in so you can't change it out the same as a regular desktop CPU.  But that's going off of a tiny picture I found online and not any intimate knowledge of your laptop's hardware.  


AMD Ryzen 3900X  |  Fractal Design S36 360 AIO w/3 Corsair SP120L and 3 Noctua NF-F12 3000 fans  |  Asus Crosshair VII WiFi X470  |  G.SKILL TridentZ 3600CL15 2x8GB @ 3800MHz 14-15-14-14-30  |  EVGA 1070 Ti SC GAMING ACX 3.0 Black w/NZXT Kraken G12 Cooler  |  Samsung 970 EVO M.2 NVMe 500GB - Boot Drive  |  Samsung 850 EVO SSD 1TB - Game Drive  |  Seagate 1TB HDD - Media Drive  |  EVGA 650 G3 PSU | Thermaltake Core P3 Case 

Link to post
Share on other sites

its soldered. either buy a new laptop or just stick with that one.


Im with the mentaility of "IF IM NOT SURE IF ITS ENOUGH COOLING, GO OVERKILL"

 

CURRENT PC SPECS    

CPU             Ryzen 5 3600 (Formerly Ryzen 3 1200)

GPU             : ASUS RX 580 Dual OC (Formerly ASUS GTX 1060 but it got corroded for some odd reasons)

GPU COOOER      : ID Cooling Frostflow 120 VGA (Stock cooler overheats even when undervolted :()

MOBO            : MSI B350m Bazooka

MEMORY          Team Group Elite TUF DDR4 3200 Mhz CL 16
STORAGE         : Seagate Baracudda 1TB and Kingston SSD
PSU             : Thermaltake Lite power 550W (Gonna change soon as i dont trust this)
CASE            : Rakk Anyag Frost
CPU COOLER      : ID-Cooling SE 207
CASE FANS       : Mix of ID cooling fans, Corsair fans and Rakk Ounos (planned change to ID Cooling)
DISPLAY         : SpectrePro XTNS24 144hz Curved VA panel
MOUSE           : Logitech G502 Hero
KEYBOARD        : Rakk Lam Ang

HEADSET         : Plantronics RIG 500HD

 

and a whole lot of LED everywhere(behind the monitor, behind the desk, behind the shelf of the PC mount and inside the case)

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Kathan Mehta said:

I am currently using laptop with HP  8136 PFJEAE21V9GKBB  31.43 motherboard....It has 8 gb of ddr3 RAM with core i5 6th Gen. processor. Is it possible to upgrade the processor to core i7 6 generation ? I am really thinking about to changing a processor in my laptop but I am not getting needed information about processors and upgrades supported by my HP Pavillion motherboard. My bios serial number is CND53897D4. 

Short answer: no.

Long answer: Still a probably no.. But one might argue that you could desolder it from the board and solder a new BGA component in place. But that is a really difficult thing to achieve, which would require a new CPU as well as all the tools for BGA soldering. So at that point you might as well get a new laptop.


"We're all in this together, might as well be friends" Tom, Toonami.

Sorry if my post seemed rude, that is never my intention.

"Why do we suffer a lifetime for a moment of happiness?" - Anonymous

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×