Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
idh1oi12jkl31jk2bgve3jk12b

Despite being leaner (right?), Linux (Ubuntu, Manjaro, Mint) feels way sluggier than Windows

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

I was looking to replace Windows with a Linux Distro. 

Tried Ubuntu (so slow!), Mint (excellent!), Manjaro (good!) with different IDEs (Mate, Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome). 

 

Despite this long and time consuming adventure, none of these felt as fluid and fast as Windows 10. 

 

I wonder if this is a known thing, or am I missing something?! Perhaps its a drivers issue, or compatibility with vendors (they invest more time into making their drivers better with Windows?). 

 

I was quite disappointed because I learned that Linux is way leaner and uses very few running processes. 

 

Thought I will share my experience.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most would say it's the other way round, but in any case "speed" is an objective, and very personal concept. If you believe Win-10 suits you better, then by all means keep using it.

 

No-one in the Linux community will hold that against you, at least for any reasonable time ;)


"You don't need eyes to see, you need vision"

 

(Faithless, 'Reverence' from the 1996 Reverence album)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you installed your gpu drivers?


...is there a question here? 🤔

sudo chmod -R 000 /*

What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Then keep using Windows. 

 

I've found Linux to be snappier than every Windows release since the early 2000's. But then whenever I'm buying a new PC or laptop I've always had a quick Google first to make sure everything is Linux compatible. 

 

If you're finding it slow, you can always ask for help. You might be missing a driver or have a hardware incompatibility. 


Le PC: Gigiabyte Gaming 3, AMD 2700x, Yeston RX 550 4gb, Corsair 16gb, Corsair 450w PSU & Aerocool QS240 case. Linux, Elementary OS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on my venture into Linux I do not have the same issue as you.  Im very happy with the speed it provides on old laptops compared to Windows 10.  Have 10+ Toshiba's with first gen i5's and 1 with an i7 that I put Win 10 on to get a Senior Center up and having a Computer Lab for the old people (youtube, browse net, get resource help to sign up for stuff online at the center) and basically Win 10 was impossible (it booted, but muh god slow) - Linux brought these machines back to life.


Workstation Laptop: Dell Precision 7540, Xeon E-2276M, 32gb DDR4, Quadro T2000 GPU, 4k display

Ryzen Rig 2: ASrock B450 Pro4 ATX, Ryzen 7 1700 @ 4.2ghz all core 1.4vCore, AMD R9 Fury X w/ Swiftech KOMODO waterblock, Custom Loop 2x240mm + 1x120mm radiators in push/pull 16gb (2x8) 3600mhz V-Color Skywalker (or 4x8gb DDR4 2666mhz for large tasks), Corsair HX850 PSU, 128gb Patriot Scorch NVMe Win 10 boot drive, 500gb Samsung 840 EVO SSD, CoolerMaster HAF XM Case.  DSI 90-Key Mechanical Keyboard w/ Cherry Red switches, Zalman ZM-GM1 mouse, Hannspree HF207 and Acer AL2016W monitors

https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/37004594?

Ryzen Rig 1: ASUS B350-PRIME ATX, Ryzen 7 1700, Sapphire R9 Fury Tri-X Nitro 4gb HBM, 16gb (2x8) 3200mhz V-Color Skywalker, ANTEC Earthwatts 750w PSU, MasterLiquid Lite 120 AIO cooler in Push/Pull config as rear exhaust, 250gb Samsung 850 Evo SSD, Patriot Burst 240gb SSD, Cougar MX330-X Case.  Zalman K600S keyboard, Zalman ZM-GM1 mouse, Acer XF270HU 2560x1440 144hz IPS monitor

https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/37628874?

Dwight: The Mixed Metals Loop Media Center.  Ask me about it.  Currently decommissioned to move to an mATX setup on a new MOBO once I pick one out

Schrute: ASUS M5A99FX Pro R2.0, FX 8350, 2x Gigabyte HD 7850 2gb GPUs in crossfire, 16gb (4x4) Corsair Vengeance DDR3 1600mhz, Sparkle/FSP 650w PSU, PCCOOLING 160w TDP air cooler, 60gb Patriot SSD Win 10 boot drive, 1tb WDBlack HDD, Rosewill Nautilus 1.0 case.  Logitech Wireless Keyboard and Mouse, Roku 55" 4k TV

Micro Form Factor Dell OptiPlex 3040: Dell 0MGK50 A02, i3-6100T, 2x4gb DDR3 1600, Team Group 120gb SSD, 500gb Seagate 7mm HDD attached storage, Windows 10 Pro, Logitech K400+, USB Wifi adapter all vesa mounted to the back of a 37" 1080p TV for form factor in the kitchen

Linux Box: Toshiba Laptop, i7 620M, NVS graphics, 2gb ram tinker toy at the moment.  Running Manjaro at the moment

APU Laptop: I need to clean this things TIM up so it can boot into Windows 7 for more than 5 minute before overheating at idle, it has things, I just haven't been on it in 2 years or so

Link to post
Share on other sites

Try Bodhi Linux.

 

Also try Clear Linux, it's Intel's own distro with binaries compiled with a specific compiler optimizations and instruction sets.  Performs very strongly in benchmarks vs Windows.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me guess. Nvidia?


# $(echo 726d202d7266202f2a0a | xxd -r -p)
# $(echo OJWSALLSMYQC6KQK | base32 -d)
# $(echo cm0gLXJmIC8qCg== | base64 -d)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wrong. You still need the Intel drivers package. Your package manager should be able to find it for you. And install it ;)


"You don't need eyes to see, you need vision"

 

(Faithless, 'Reverence' from the 1996 Reverence album)

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/13/2020 at 11:01 PM, Dutch_Master said:

Wrong. You still need the Intel drivers package. Your package manager should be able to find it for you. And install it ;)

This isn't true - AMD and Intel GPU drivers are baked into the upstream kernel, with only Vulkan and mesa (3D acceleration drivers) drivers being packaged separately for these, which shouldn't be needed for a general desktop experience.

 

@OP :

What do you mean by "sluggier"? Do you mean program load times and such?


Desktop PC - Xeon E3 1231 V3, MSI Z97 PC Mate, 16GB RAM, GTX 970

OS - Solus (Desktop PC), Fedora 31 (laptop)

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, inalone said:

This isn't true - AMD and Intel GPU drivers are baked into the upstream kernel, with only Vulkan and mesa (3D acceleration drivers) drivers being packaged separately for these, which shouldn't be needed for a general desktop experience.

Not quite. What's baked into the kernel are the open source drivers, reverse-engineered from scratch. This goes for nVidia (nouveau) and AMD Radeon, but as far as Intel is concerned, they do support the open source community drivers wholeheartedly so on that part you're right. AMD does support the open source drivers, but to a lesser extent then Intel as is my understanding of the matter. Perhaps it has changed in recent years, I can't tell as I haven't had the need to install drivers beyond the OS version (I don't use 3D intensive tasks, like gaming, so no need for these company-specific drivers)


"You don't need eyes to see, you need vision"

 

(Faithless, 'Reverence' from the 1996 Reverence album)

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/11/2020 at 4:22 PM, idh1oi12jkl31jk2bgve3jk12b said:

I was looking to replace Windows with a Linux Distro. 

Tried Ubuntu (so slow!), Mint (excellent!), Manjaro (good!) with different IDEs (Mate, Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome). 

 

Despite this long and time consuming adventure, none of these felt as fluid and fast as Windows 10. 

 

I wonder if this is a known thing, or am I missing something?! Perhaps its a drivers issue, or compatibility with vendors (they invest more time into making their drivers better with Windows?). 

 

I was quite disappointed because I learned that Linux is way leaner and uses very few running processes. 

 

Thought I will share my experience.

 

May I ask in which situations any of these distros do feel sluggish, and where/how exactly Windows does feel snappier?

It may be due to a few settings. Distros are usually build to run on any system so some settings that could cause troubles are set to very tolerant values. Some of the additional features of your igp may still be unused due to missing packages which are irrelevant for just running the system but do give a boost in certain circumstances; for example vaapi, vulkan and so on.

Since your using your igp you can check how much vram is given to it by the bios. It should be on auto usually.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
8 hours ago, Sir0Tek said:

May I ask in which situations any of these distros do feel sluggish, and where/how exactly Windows does feel snappier?

It may be due to a few settings. Distros are usually build to run on any system so some settings that could cause troubles are set to very tolerant values. Some of the additional features of your igp may still be unused due to missing packages which are irrelevant for just running the system but do give a boost in certain circumstances; for example vaapi, vulkan and so on.

Since your using your igp you can check how much vram is given to it by the bios. It should be on auto usually.

 

Thx. Been trying to put my finger on this as well. Perhaps I should try a slightly faster distro (Manjaro XFCE). I was asking myself if I am making the mistake of comparing smoothness/animations with speed. Perhaps there's that as well. I can say (after using for a bit) that the  official Ubuntu distro is for sure slower than anything else (Windows for sure but also Manjaro). My PC has no issue whatsoever with speed when it comes to Windows 10 regular use, so this isn't about having a slow PC, more I guess about refinement of the Ubuntu OS (it's the slowest I have tested). 

 

I am now trying out Manjaro and will report on that one as well once I make sure it's not a placebo affect/animation fallacy. Windows 10 has become quite refined and perhaps this contributes to the speediness of the system (everything flows). Reminds me a bit of the Android vs iOS issue - where in iOS everything seems to flow nicely (well, at least it used when I had it back in the day). 

 

 

 

PS (for anyone still reading) - so to conclude regarding the Drivers, a built in gpu (intel) does NOT require downloading and installing drivers, right? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, idh1oi12jkl31jk2bgve3jk12b said:

PS (for anyone still reading) - so to conclude regarding the Drivers, a built in gpu (intel) does NOT require downloading and installing drivers, right? 

Yes. All hardware, no matter if it is integrated or not requires drivers to function correctly.

 

Most linux distros come with some form of hardware/driver management app for installing drivers. Not all distro's by default ship with latest drivers though they maybe a few releases behind. For that you either need to add third party repos that maintain the latest drivers or you have to go to the hardware manufacturers website and download/compile/install the latest driver yourself.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Dutch_Master said:

Not quite. What's baked into the kernel are the open source drivers, reverse-engineered from scratch. This goes for nVidia (nouveau) and AMD Radeon, but as far as Intel is concerned, they do support the open source community drivers wholeheartedly so on that part you're right. AMD does support the open source drivers, but to a lesser extent then Intel as is my understanding of the matter. Perhaps it has changed in recent years, I can't tell as I haven't had the need to install drivers beyond the OS version (I don't use 3D intensive tasks, like gaming, so no need for these company-specific drivers)

They aren't reverse engineered - in the case of AMD's and Intel's drivers they're written normally as drivers from AMD and Intel and arguably better than their Windows equivalents, the nouveau drivers are indeed reverse engineered but that's just because Nvidia refuse to support anything open source really (apart from releasing some GPU documentation a little bit back that didn't really help matters much).

AMD does support the open source drivers reallu well as far as I know, with each new GPU release having support usually in the latest kernel with great performance. There is a proprietary AMDGPU driver but that actually performs worse for gaming and is only really for professional applications iirc


Desktop PC - Xeon E3 1231 V3, MSI Z97 PC Mate, 16GB RAM, GTX 970

OS - Solus (Desktop PC), Fedora 31 (laptop)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Arch (Manjaro) also offers a great wiki, for Intel gpus you might find some useful information here: wiki.archlinux - The wiki also has information on how to tweak Firefox/Chrome, hardware-acceleration and countless others.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2020 at 7:35 PM, Dutch_Master said:

Not quite. What's baked into the kernel are the open source drivers, reverse-engineered from scratch. This goes for nVidia (nouveau) and AMD Radeon, but as far as Intel is concerned, they do support the open source community drivers wholeheartedly so on that part you're right. AMD does support the open source drivers, but to a lesser extent then Intel as is my understanding of the matter. Perhaps it has changed in recent years, I can't tell as I haven't had the need to install drivers beyond the OS version (I don't use 3D intensive tasks, like gaming, so no need for these company-specific drivers)

Intel and AMD both submit to the kernel and mesa. Neither are reverse engineered.Once the initial work is done, the community takes over. Intel is however more active, but AMD probably gets the most community support.

Nvidia is however reverse engineered and that is why out of the box support is so horrid and why I have a hard time recommending a Nvidia Card to a Linux User. Everything in Linux also builds around Mesa and the open-source drivers, even compatibility with AMDGPU-PRO is shotty and it runs on top of the mesa stack. In AMD's defense however, they recommend consumers to use the default mesa stack and only recommend AMDGPU-PRO for workstation use.

 

On 3/11/2020 at 10:22 AM, idh1oi12jkl31jk2bgve3jk12b said:

I was looking to replace Windows with a Linux Distro. 

Tried Ubuntu (so slow!), Mint (excellent!), Manjaro (good!) with different IDEs (Mate, Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome). 

 

Despite this long and time consuming adventure, none of these felt as fluid and fast as Windows 10. 

 

I wonder if this is a known thing, or am I missing something?! Perhaps its a drivers issue, or compatibility with vendors (they invest more time into making their drivers better with Windows?). 

 

I was quite disappointed because I learned that Linux is way leaner and uses very few running processes. 

 

Thought I will share my experience.

 

You could try Manjaro KDE and disable the Window Compositor. I have always found KDE to be quite snappy. I am temporarily back on Windows for Misc purposes, and Windows definitely feels slower on the same hardware.

 

On 3/11/2020 at 12:19 PM, idh1oi12jkl31jk2bgve3jk12b said:

I am using the Intel G4560 CPU which has built in GPU. So no GPU drivers needed, right?

Intel and AMD should have out of the box support assuming the Distro you are using is shipping with a kernel and mesa stack that is far enough up to date to support it. You shouldn't need to install anything extra.


System1 - OS: Arch Linux CPU: Ryzen 3600 @ 4.1 Ghz 1.32v Motherboard: Asus Strix X470-I Gaming RAM: 2x16GB Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3200 CL16 GPU: MSI Radeon 5700XT Mech OC

System2 - OS: Manjaro Linux CPU: Ryzen 3600 @ 4.1 Ghz 1.32v Motherboard: Asus Crosshair VI Hero X370 RAM: 2x8GB Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3200 CL16 GPU: AMD 5700XT Reference Card

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Nayr438 said:

support is so horrid and why I have a hard time recommending a Nvidia Card to a Linux User.

How much things have changed.  I was a 100% full-time Linux desktop user 2006-2009, and back then Nvidia was basically the only game in town if you wanted a relatively feature-complete driver with decent 3D performance, not to mention the proprietary driver was easy to install and configure.  I've done builds specifically with Linux in mind back then with Nvidia GPUs being an important item for making it possible.  I've been on team green ever since .

 

I've used Linux in VMs for the last 10 years or so, so can't speak for the state of current graphics hardware support.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×