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Lancepao

Upgrading very soon. I have concerns.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hello! I'm planning an upgrade soon but I have my concerns. Currently, I own an Intel i3-7100 and I want to upgrade it to a Ryzen 5 2600 with more ram and obviously, a new motherboard. Those are the only things that I'll be upgrading. What will happen wo my Windows 10, my files, and programs? Do I have to do a reinstall of Windows and back my data up? I just wanna upgrade my parts, man. Thanks!

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1. Buy R5 3600.

2. Just boot your Windows and you'll be fine. Before motherboard swap - link your local account to Microsoft Account. There is absolutely no need to reinstall / install Windows again. Your win10 will find new drivers at first boot. Rest of drivers you must install exactly the same as while you install new system (download from manufacturer's website). If you want to remove some old, inactive drivers for some reason - you may use Ghostbuster tool. And RAPR if you want to remove old versions of existing drivers.

 

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Reinstalling windows is extremely highly recommended else you. Are likely to face issues ranging from minor bugs to blue screens. ALWAYS reinstall when making massive platform changes.

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3 minutes ago, 5x5 said:

Reinstalling windows is extremely highly recommended else you. Are likely to face issues ranging from minor bugs to blue screens. ALWAYS reinstall when making massive platform changes.

Totally not needed anymore since Windows 10. (have an SSD i use on all sorts of PC's and it works almost perfectly)
Was needed for all them before.


When i ask for more specs, don't expect me to know the answer!
I'm just helping YOU to help YOURSELF!
(The more info you give the easier it is for others to help you out!)

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As always here someone must say that reinstalling system is needed, otherwise user may experience "some" unspecified problems. I think every problem, including motherboard fried after storm, will be blame on not reinstalling Windows. People who reinstall system every hardware change are more healthy, live longer, have better hair condition and less problems with teeth.

 

Seriously, where these opinions come from? Not from personal experience - that's for sure.

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i always reinstall windows when upgrading motherboards. i have had north bridge and driver issues before on windows 10. it may work for some but i dont see the need to risk it after you spend time upgrading and assuming the old install will work and it doesnt. now you have to install windows and you werent counting on it.

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This forum should be moderated more and all harmful advices should be removed. Reinstalling Windows (or, to be more specified - made clean install) is that type of harmful advice. User lose every settings, programs must be reinstalled, it takes very long time (not system itself, but all programs, settings, files etc) and gives absolutely NOTHING except good feeling. Yes, people who reinstalling system very often must feel like specialists - they setup everything so many times so they must be, isn't?

 

Look how many people have THE SAME problems (like described by people as side effect of not reinstalling system) when they install fresh Windows. But nobody say "oh, you have bluescreen because you installed fresh system".

 

Seriously, I made dozens of motherboard swaps (even using win7) and never had bad experience and any problems with bluescreens, updates, settings, freezes etc. I'm working right now on computer that has motherboard change and system cloned (imaged/restored) three times (because of SSD change to bigger one two times). My wife's computer has hardware change from i5 4570 to Ryzen 5 3600 (and system imaged/restored once). My system was installed about 4 or 5 years ago. I'm still waiting for experiencing "some problems". So far - nothing. Even better - in my bedroom I have old Core2Quad with cloned system from my new computer and changed from GPT to MBR. And it works fine. That's only three examples, but still - how is your experience (this is question for guys who always reinstall system)? I bet that was just one, probably unrelated problem, which was considered as effect of not reinstalling system.

 

It's after all the same system. And if someone understand how it works - it will be obvious that installing system again after hardware change is waste of time.

 

Having bad experience after motherboard change? Check your new hardware first, not start with reinstalling system.

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2 hours ago, Lancepao said:

Hello! I'm planning an upgrade soon but I have my concerns. Currently, I own an Intel i3-7100 and I want to upgrade it to a Ryzen 5 2600 with more ram and obviously, a new motherboard. Those are the only things that I'll be upgrading. What will happen wo my Windows 10, my files, and programs? Do I have to do a reinstall of Windows and back my data up? I just wanna upgrade my parts, man. Thanks!

Just put the drive in the new system and it should install the appropriate chipset drivers automatically (assuming it's connected to internet).

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54 minutes ago, ZzLy said:

Just put the drive in the new system and it should install the appropriate chipset drivers automatically (assuming it's connected to internet).

Well, not really, AMD recommed to install their own updated drivers, but you're right in general - plugging drive and boot is enough. Drivers should be updated anyway, no matter if someone boot old drive or install new system.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hello, everyone. Thank you all for your answers it really means a lot to me receiving help. Just a quick update, I've bought the parts:

-Ryzen 5 2600 (couldn't get the 3600 because my budget isn't enough, unfortunately) 

-MSI A320M-A Pro M2

-2x4GB Kingston Hyper X 2666Mhz

 

Talking to the shop employees, one said that upon booting the system with my old drives, my Windows 10 license will be deactivated as a result of me installing a new mobo. I could still use my pc and still have my files, programs, and such I just wouldn't be able to change a few settings according to him. He added that in order to reactivate my Windows 10 license, I should purchase a new one. Would that be correct? Thank you all for your support. Cheers! 

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Not really. Before swap, link your local account to Microsoft account. Then your license will be linked to your account, not to motherboard, and you can reactivate your system on new hardware using troubleshoot button (or it even activates itself like in my case).

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1 hour ago, Lancepao said:

Hello, everyone. Thank you all for your answers it really means a lot to me receiving help. Just a quick update, I've bought the parts:

-Ryzen 5 2600 (couldn't get the 3600 because my budget isn't enough, unfortunately) 

-MSI A320M-A Pro M2

-2x4GB Kingston Hyper X 2666Mhz

 

Talking to the shop employees, one said that upon booting the system with my old drives, my Windows 10 license will be deactivated as a result of me installing a new mobo. I could still use my pc and still have my files, programs, and such I just wouldn't be able to change a few settings according to him. He added that in order to reactivate my Windows 10 license, I should purchase a new one. Would that be correct? Thank you all for your support. Cheers! 

Reinstall the OS and contact Microsoft - they'll reactivate the key. It's quite seamless really. As for why you should reinstall - Intel, AMD and Nvidia drivers tend to conflict when changing platforms and when you just move the OS from one system to another, there is massive conflicts, errors and missing or semi-broken files still active. Instead of cleaning all of it by hand or waiting for the eventual problems like broken audio, misbehaving clocks or sensors and etc, just do a fresh install and have peace of mind. Lots of people who have next to no experience will often claim that moving the OS directly is safe and fine - it is NOT. It's only okay when moving from one vendor's old platform to their newer platform. Like from an Intel H85 to a Z170 board or from an AMD B150 to a X570. It's not a good idea to keep ALL the Intel software, firmware and utilities and just overwrite them with AMD ones - it will create a massive list of issues. Hence why reinstalling the OS is always highly recommended by any self-respecting knowledgeable person.

TL:DR - Don't be lazy, install Win10 again. Takes 20 mins and solves a BUNCH of issues

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1 hour ago, 5x5 said:

Lots of people who have next to no experience will often claim that moving the OS directly is safe and fine - it is NOT.

How many computers I must update/upgrade to have enough experience in your opinion? And how good do you know how system works if you think that Windows uses drivers for devices that are not present in system? Sure - Intel drivers, if you don't remove them, are still present in your AMD system, but they're ghosted - waiting for proper device to run. Information which drivers system use in current config is stored in registry. And you can always clean unused drivers in one minute if you really want to be so clean.

 

Also - 20 minutes for installing new system? Maybe for someone like you, who apparently not doing anything interesting on computer. For many people it's hours or days before everything starts working again (programs, settings, restore private files etc.). Sure for single browser and 2 games it may be the same, but not for serious computer use.

 

 

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6 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

How many computers I must update/upgrade to have enough experience in your opinion? And how good do you know how system works if you think that Windows uses drivers for devices that are not present in system? Sure - Intel drivers, if you don't remove them, are still present in your AMD system, but they're ghosted - waiting for proper device to run. Information which drivers system use in current config is stored in registry. And you can always clean unused drivers in one minute if you really want to be so clean.

 

Also - 20 minutes for installing new system? Maybe for someone like you, who apparently not doing anything interesting on computer. For many people it's hours or days before everything starts working again (programs, settings, restore private files etc.). Sure for single browser and 2 games it may be the same, but not for serious computer use.

 

 

 

I actually had this exact debate here a few days ago.
While it is "better" to reinstall after system swap, it's totally not "necessary" for Windows 10.

Some people here doesn't understand this.....

Also, I try to avoid OS reinstall because of all the registry settings I make as I go and these are a huge pain in the donkey to readjust.

 

You'll go even more insane when you try to explain how Intel is still better for some use case. lol

 

 

 

 

Anyway, before I go off topic,

8 hours ago, Lancepao said:

Hello! I'm planning an upgrade soon but I have my concerns. Currently, I own an Intel i3-7100 and I want to upgrade it to a Ryzen 5 2600 with more ram and obviously, a new motherboard. Those are the only things that I'll be upgrading. What will happen wo my Windows 10, my files, and programs? Do I have to do a reinstall of Windows and back my data up? I just wanna upgrade my parts, man. Thanks!

Windows 10 will be fine, you can just plug in your current drive and you won't notice anything most likely.

However, what are you using this computer for?

If it's for gaming I'd honestly just grab a cheap i7 7700K for the price of 2600 and save the mobo money.

Then you can change your PC all together when AM5 comes out.

I'm saying this because 7100 to 2600 is not a big upgrade in terms of gaming.

But if you are going for 3600 that's  a big change.


i9-10940X @5.40GHz (currently the top OC record):  https://valid.x86.fr/5jiapc

Full Spec: https://valid.x86.fr/072kmr

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@ImNotNeko: is it really better? For preventing some unspecified problems that exists only as myths? I agree that readjustment everything is total pain. It's not that system is set once and that's all. Some settings, tweaks, configs etc are made from time to time. Collect them all after fresh install is really hard.

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And now we're recommending four year old hardware with 1151v1. Incredible...

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9 hours ago, homeap5 said:

1. Buy R5 3600.

2. Just boot your Windows and you'll be fine. Before motherboard swap - link your local account to Microsoft Account. There is absolutely no need to reinstall / install Windows again. Your win10 will find new drivers at first boot. Rest of drivers you must install exactly the same as while you install new system (download from manufacturer's website). If you want to remove some old, inactive drivers for some reason - you may use Ghostbuster tool. And RAPR if you want to remove old versions of existing drivers.

 

 

9 hours ago, HanZie82 said:

Totally not needed anymore since Windows 10. (have an SSD i use on all sorts of PC's and it works almost perfectly)
Was needed for all them before.

do you guys use ddu for your video card?

 

if so thats kinda ironic just for a vid card but whole os is ok from conflicting drivers hmmm

 

 

if op want stability reinstall which i'd recommend

and on registry tweaks, a user will know which ones they need to do as soon as they come up

if they ever did in the first place

 

 

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51 minutes ago, pas008 said:

do you guys use ddu for your video card?

No. I maybe used it once long time ago. Didn't know exactly why, but I remember that was very strange system I was trying to repair/diagnose and that was one of method to eliminate potential problems.

 

So, as you see - it's not ironic. You assumed that I'm using DDU. You're wrong.

 

All kind of recommendation should be based on hard evidences. Not "some issues", but real examples with explanation. Why on dozens computers I made (and few I use every day for years) I have no stability issues, problems with bsods etc? Is it magic? Luck? No, it can't be, because computers do not work based on luck or magic. When system loads, it load current hardware configuration, check for hardware changes and if there any - installing drivers for new hardware and update current configuration. It can even restart itself when needed for proper work after drivers install at boot. Then old drivers remain inactive, because do not fit to any existing hardware. It's like having zipped program on hard drive - it takes some space, but it not autostart, not use any resources and is not used by any extension.

 

Is it that hard to understand? Because many people recommend something, it doesn't mean it's true. One person repeats after another and then we have crap like "reinstall system even if you change mouse" or "reinstall windows every minor problem, it's the easiest/only way".

 

It's always facts vs myths. As I said - I upgraded and prepared dozens of comptuers and basically almost never installed new system. My win10 has 4 or 5 years and works better than "fresh" (because I have lot of useful tools configured to make my work faster, not because it boots 2 seconds faster or something like that). If changing hardware is that sensitive, I should see ANY symptoms, anything. After all, I work over 10 hours per day using computer, so any instability or even suspicious delay is something I would noticed for sure.

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2 hours ago, homeap5 said:

@ImNotNeko: is it really better? For preventing some unspecified problems that exists only as myths? I agree that readjustment everything is total pain. It's not that system is set once and that's all. Some settings, tweaks, configs etc are made from time to time. Collect them all after fresh install is really hard.

It is definitely better.

Having less unused registry and small files here and there is always better.

But will average ltt forum user notice this difference? I don't think so.

I am pretty sure most of the people here don't know how to use registry without following google search results.

 

I was thinking about just pm-ing this to you but OP could also use this info.

If you want absolute best, go and do a clean install.

But judging by how you are asking, I'd say don't format unless there is a problem.


i9-10940X @5.40GHz (currently the top OC record):  https://valid.x86.fr/5jiapc

Full Spec: https://valid.x86.fr/072kmr

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29 minutes ago, ImNotNeko said:

It is definitely better.

Having less unused registry and small files here and there is always better.

But will average ltt forum user notice this difference? I don't think so.

I am pretty sure most of the people here don't know how to use registry without following google search results.

 

I was thinking about just pm-ing this to you but OP could also use this info.

If you want absolute best, go and do a clean install.

But judging by how you are asking, I'd say don't format unless there is a problem.

Funny thing with registry is that it's database, not just files, so bigger or smaller don't make your computer faster or slower. Any program or system access only this part of registry that is needed. This forum is based on database too - much bigger in fact. Do you feel that it slows down in time?

 

Anyway, I have huge amount of tools and programs installed. Even on clean system, after installing all of them, my registry size will be almost the same. It's modern times, modern computers - is nice to use them as much as possible.

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2 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

Funny thing with registry is that it's database, not just files, so bigger or smaller don't make your computer faster or slower. Any program or system access only this part of registry that is needed. This forum is based on database too - much bigger in fact. Do you feel that it slows down in time?

 

Anyway, I have huge amount of tools and programs installed. Even on clean system, after installing all of them, my registry size will be almost the same. It's modern times, modern computers - is nice to use them as much as possible.

Logically yes, but registry really messes with your speed sometimes lol....

Windows has its weird quirks.


i9-10940X @5.40GHz (currently the top OC record):  https://valid.x86.fr/5jiapc

Full Spec: https://valid.x86.fr/072kmr

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12 minutes ago, ImNotNeko said:

Logically yes, but registry really messes with your speed sometimes lol....

Windows has its weird quirks.

Yes, agree, I had that case once, still not solved (on some test machine).

But that has nothing to do with changing motherboard. More with some old Windows update. Anyway, not worth to discuss, just small interesting problem I leave to some day I'll have lot of time to investigate.

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Windows 10 license is tied to your motherboard, change the motherboard for windows its like being installed on a new device (= evaluation version) unless you link that to an email/microsoft account. How do you do that? click on here https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change

 

Theoretically (if you have an internet connection over Ethernet preferably )  it should work since windows should download new drivers/firmware for the new hardware during boot time but in my experience this is a hit or miss kind of deal... refreshing your installation doesn't hurt its like clean sheets on your bed.. the old ones may not make you sick but its better to use fresh ones :P  

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1 hour ago, homeap5 said:

So, as you see - it's not ironic. You assumed that I'm using DDU. You're wrong.

 

if you dont use DDU you are wrong :P 

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46 minutes ago, papajo said:

if you dont use DDU you are wrong :P 

I'm just not a clean maniac. I will use DDU if I'll need it. Some day. Not when everything works perfect. I know how it works and if some day I'll want to get rid of old drivers, I know tools like DDU, RAPR, Ghostbuster etc.

 

But this discussion is pointless anyway - comparing system to clean sheets... Is that means files are getting more and more dirty? Bits becomes dirty somehow? Zeros looks less nice? Maybe we should compare other things from real life? Is cleaning house important? Not really - you should build new house from time to time, especially if you have new furnitures. New ones may fit, but it is old house after all and who knows - they may not fit exactly the same good as old ones. Or maybe you bought new muffler to your car and want to install it? Yes, you can, but I strongly recommend to buy new car, it will works better.

 

I know that these comparsions have no sense. Because sometimes is impossible to compare two absolutely different things. Your old car will be slower and slower, for example. Your old computer with installed Photoshop (for example) will be the same fast (or slow, depends). It makes no sense to create comparsions like that, unless the only point is to create nice comparsion to convince people that reinstalling is needed and/or recommended.

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