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lamyathla

is it Normal for my Samsung 970 evo Plus Nvme to reach these Temp while Gaming ?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

in the Past my Windows 19 was Installed on my regular Samsung ssd 850 evo and my Games on my Western Digital black

and the max my ssd was reach is 40 to 42 C while Gaming

Now I installed my Windows 10 on my Samsung 970 evo Plus Nvme which is Near my GPU (r9 390 )

while my Games stayed on my WD black hdd

but now my new Samsung 970 evo Plus according to hwinfo 64

temp 1 65 C 

temp 2 78 C

is that Normal ?

and why such a high temp ? the Games are on my hdd

Edit if you want to tell me you need better case cooling then I have 6 fans in my case

and it's winter here temp in my room is 14 C

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, Stu_Bear said:

Maybe the GPU is acting like a space heater ?

so what ? if I get 2080 ti then I will get less gpu heat ?

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Especially since the game's not on the NVMe drive, it leads me to believe that your GPU's just blasting it with hot air. Hawaii GPUs like your 390 are just furnaces (I know from personal experience) so it's very likely that this is what causes it. 

What case are you using and how have you got your airflow set up (how many intakes/exhausts and where)?


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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, Mateyyy said:

Especially since the game's not on the NVMe drive, it leads me to believe that your GPU's just blasting it with hot air. Hawaii GPUs like your 390 are just furnaces (I know from personal experience) so it's very likely that this is what causes it. 

What case are you using and how have you got your airflow set up (how many intakes/exhausts and where)?

it's winter here 

temp in my room are between 9 to 14 C

also I have 6 fans inside my Case 2 Intake and 3 exhusts

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4 minutes ago, lamyathla said:

it's winter here 

temp in my room are between 9 to 14 C

also I have 6 fans inside my Case 2 Intake and 3 exhusts

You could just run heaven benchmark on a constant loop and use the R9 to heat your house ;) 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
4 minutes ago, Stu_Bear said:

You could just run heaven benchmark on a constant loop and use the R9 to heat your house ;) 

my R9 390 can reach up to 59 to 61 C while benchmark

how can that heat my room ?

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5 minutes ago, lamyathla said:

my R9 390 can reach up to 59 to 61 C while benchmark

how can that heat my room ?

Sorry I was being stupid/silly....those are actually great temps for any GPU.  Think my GTX 1080 gets hotter than that.  I'm the one who should be using his GPU to heat his house :) 

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9 minutes ago, lamyathla said:

my R9 390 can reach up to 59 to 61 C while benchmark

how can that heat my room ?

I know that @Stu_Bear was joking, but it isn't far from the truth.  That video card is going to put off heat and that heat is going to end up in that room and eventually raise the temp of it.  As that GPU heats up any components directly around it can reasonably be expected to soak up (or at least not be able to shed) heat.  That's what people are assuming is happening to your NVMe drive as many get installed in a slot that gets covered by the GPU.  

 

Do you have multiple m.2 slots on your motherboard?  And if so -- do they go to the CPU or the chipset?  Those temps are fine now, but when summer comes that may no longer be the case.  


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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, nick name said:

I know that @Stu_Bear was joking, but it isn't far from the truth.  That video card is going to put off heat and that heat is going to end up in that room and eventually raise the temp of it.  As that GPU heats up any components directly around it can reasonably be expected to soak up (or at least not be able to shed) heat.  That's what people are assuming is happening to your NVMe drive as many get installed in a slot that gets covered by the GPU.  

 

Do you have multiple m.2 slots on your motherboard?  And if so -- do they go to the CPU or the chipset?  Those temps are fine now, but when summer comes that may no longer be the case.  

so if I get 2080 ti while Gaming the temp will be less than 60 C which is what im getting now ?

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4 minutes ago, lamyathla said:

so if I get 2080 ti while Gaming the temp will be less than 60 C which is what im getting now ?

I guess it depends on the type of cooler on the GPU, but I'm assuming any 2080 ti will have a massive cooler that won't focus as much heat on your NVMe drive.  

 

So if this is the excuse you need to pull the trigger on a 2080 ti then I give you permission to do so.  Upgrade that GPU.  Do it.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, nick name said:

I guess it depends on the type of cooler on the GPU, but I'm assuming any 2080 ti will have a massive cooler that won't focus as much heat on your NVMe drive.  

 

So if this is the excuse you need to pull the trigger on a 2080 ti then I give you permission to do so.  Upgrade that GPU.  Do it.

are you kidding me or what ?

according to GeForce rtx 2080 ti review it can get up to 74 C while Gaming

14 C higher than my r9 390

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I have a 2tb 970 EVO with a 5.1ghz CPU on air and a 2080 ti on air.

The EVO in open world games is at 44c.

 

I use the EVO without a heatsink since it was trapping heat. 


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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, jones177 said:

I have a 2tb 970 EVO with a 5.1ghz CPU on air and a 2080 ti on air.

The EVO in open world games is at 44c.

 

I use the EVO without a heatsink since it was trapping heat. 

do you have the evo near you gpu or cpu ? which m2 slot ?

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1 minute ago, lamyathla said:

are you kidding me or what ?

according to GeForce rtx 2080 ti review it can get up to 74 C while Gaming

14 C higher than my r9 390

Yeah, but those tests likely weren't done in a room with a 14*C ambient temp.  Do you understand how to translate thermal performance?  You can't simply look at the temperature of the component.  You have to also take into account the ambient temperature around the computer.  So you measure (at idle and under load) the component temps and find the difference between the component and the ambient temp.  You can take that difference and use that difference to get a more accurate idea of what temps would be like in different environments.  

 

And I wasn't speaking to the GPU temp, but how the GPU cooler would impact your NVMe drive.  

 

 


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1 hour ago, lamyathla said:

are you kidding me or what ?

according to GeForce rtx 2080 ti review it can get up to 74 C while Gaming

14 C higher than my r9 390

I guess there's a bigger misunderstanding.
The component temperature does not say anything about how much heat onto the environment. There are 3 main things - Temperature of the component, heat capacity and heat flow/heat rate.

 

temperature is obviously a number in degree celcius, fahrenheit or in kelvin (which would be the absolut scala) and simply says something about how hot it is compared to absolut zero Kelvin.

 

heat capacity is how much energy you need to put into something to raise the objects temperature. Air is simplified with very little energy heated up, whereas for water you need compareable much much more energy to raise the temp to the same degree. This is for our problem here not as relevant, this is more relevant for different cooling solutions (that's a reason for example why you need to let a waterloop run for a bit to reach an equilibrium point.)

 

heat flow is how much heat wanders to a different place - from a gpu core via the cooler to the surrounding air for example. This is more often than not generated by losses because of bad efficiency.

 

if you have a very good heat transferring system (aka a beefy and well designed cooler) you can carry the heat much more faster away from the component that produces it, which leads to a okish core temperature in this case. The 390s are very power hungry which results in a high heatflow away from the core, heating up the air around it and the air pushed through the fins by the fans. This hot air then hits the ssd, which will be heated up as it is colder as the air surrounding it and physics likes things in equilibrium.

Why @nick name agreed on that the 2080ti will solve the problem partly is the 2080ti will a) probably will produce less heat flow, and b) the airflow out of the 390 might put the ssd right in the stream of the hot air, while the 2080ti could not have the problem as the airflow will differ.

 

One thing to understand: a 10W chip could run way hotter than a 400W chip, if the 400W chip is adequatly cooled. So looking at only the core temp is no way to tell how much heat the card dumps into the environment. And if you look at all the reviews, even on lower end cards, you'll see that most of them max out at the same temperature or the lower end even higher than the top tier card - it's all about the heat transfer efficiency of the cooler. One way to quickly tell roughly how much heat the cards dump into the environment is the TDP - Thermal Design Power, rated in watts. And you will see your 390 has a very high TDP in comparison to new cards. Most people take it as a power usage of the card, but that's technically not 100% correct.

 

On the other hand I wouldn't buy a 2080ti, but that purely depends on the rest of the system and is based on the pure value.

To swing back to one of the earlier comments: As the 390 has such an efficient cooler, it just dumps all the heat energy in the surrounding area, that's why you can easily use it as space heater even though the core just shows in the 60 degree range ;)

Hope this makes a bit of sense for you and clarifies a few things.


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this is why im worried about buying an nvme drive instead of an old SSD drive that would have a cable thus not sitting right on the mobo... sure its slower but i dont want my data be in danger due high temps. specialyl when im planning on buying 970 evo plus

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1 hour ago, lamyathla said:

do you have the evo near you gpu or cpu ? which m2 slot ?

Looks like this.

My room temp is 23c and the EVO idles at 29c.

The EVO is under a Noctua NH-D15.

evo.jpg.b80f62ab6b08491db0b7aeb69ef850c2.jpg


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Samsung drives have two temperatures: the first is for the flash, which generally likes it warm, while the latter is for the controller. Most SSD controllers are designed to begin throttling around 70C but this is far from exact for a variety of reasons (e.g. sensor placement and accuracy). Internally the controller knows when to throttle, the reading is just for your benefit. In any case, usually you reach maximum throttling before about 80C. So yes, 78C is too high, especially when gaming since that's not really a heavy workload for the drive itself, some adjacent components are overheating the drive. I would advocate for a heatsink but it suggests a larger problem with your case cooling. (FYI, your GPU will also throttle and/or ramp up the fan to keep it around 73C because of the way NVIDIA steps, but that is outside the realm of this particular discussion)

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10 hours ago, lamyathla said:

it's winter here 

temp in my room are between 9 to 14 C

also I have 6 fans inside my Case 2 Intake and 3 exhusts

Temp inside your house is 9 to 14C? You keep your winter coat on?

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