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HalGameGuru

Quantum Cascade LASER tech promises drastically increased data transmission speeds

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Posted · Original PosterOP

New laser technology promises a future of fiber optic speeds thousands of times what they are now. Using "Terahertz Quantum Cascade LASERs" and a new modulation method data throughput could theoretically improve dramatically in coming years. These lasers have been around for a while but were limited to more theoretical or scientific use with the limits assumed on the application of their beams. It was just too difficult to work them to the same level as far lower frequency lasers.

 

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The specific kind of lasers are different because they send out light in the terahertz range of the electromagnetic spectrum, which is largely used to analyse chemicals. But by turning them to use to send data, they could provide much faster connections for research facilities, hospitals, satellite communications or any other situations where very fast network connections are required.

 

Apparently most of the fuss is over the new method of modulation. Terahertz is a very tough frequency range to modulate for communication. but a new method has allowed them to verifiably and consistently modulate and pulse the lasers in a way that will allow vastly accelerated transmission of coherent data. Which could theoretically allow super fast long distance trunk lines.

 

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ABSTRACT:

The fast modulation of lasers is a fundamental requirement for applications in optical communications, high-resolution spectroscopy and metrology. In the terahertz-frequency range, the quantum-cascade laser (QCL) is a high-power source with the potential for high-frequency modulation. However, conventional electronic modulation is limited fundamentally by parasitic device impedance, and so alternative physical processes must be exploited to modulate the QCL gain on ultrafast timescales. Here, we demonstrate an alternative mechanism to modulate the emission from a QCL device, whereby optically-generated acoustic phonon pulses are used to perturb the QCL bandstructure, enabling fast amplitude modulation that can be controlled using the QCL drive current or strain pulse amplitude, to a maximum modulation depth of 6% in our experiment. We show that this modulation can be explained using perturbation theory analysis. While the modulation rise-time was limited to ~800 ps by our measurement system, theoretical considerations suggest considerably faster modulation could be possible.

 

I would like to see more work done on this, super high frequency EM radiation has so many theoretical uses I really wanna see practical and commodity uses for these advanced technologies

 

 

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Meanwhile people who live in more remote areas (like me) will be stuck with the same ISP, the same shitty speeds, and shite service all because no one else dare lay line out this far or underground.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I still don't get why they stopped with microwave. We had it here for a while, super fast, super long range.

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7 hours ago, HalGameGuru said:

I still don't get why they stopped with microwave. We had it here for a while, super fast, super long range.

Do you mean fiber with microwaves or microwaves in the air? The later requires licensed bands or crowded unlicensed bands (which affect the QoS). That's why cables are magic: you basically get "infinite" spectrum for "free".

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Not really useful for consumer internet though.


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Amazing approach to much faster speeds. Fun to get insight into it early on. Now would be great to see fiber infrastructure be ubiquitous actually. 


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"promises" my ass


Awareness is key. Never enough, even in the face of futility. Speak the truth as if you may never get to say it again. This world is full of ugly. Change it they say. The only way is to reveal the ugly. To change the truth you must first acknowledge it. Never pretend it isn't there. Never bend the knee.

 

Please quote my post in your reply, so that I will be notified and can respond to it. Thanks.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
10 hours ago, gabrielcarvfer said:

Do you mean fiber with microwaves or microwaves in the air? The later requires licensed bands or crowded unlicensed bands (which affect the QoS). That's why cables are magic: you basically get "infinite" spectrum for "free".

Except you have to run cable. Microwave was beamed. Apparently its still used for cellular towers and such as backhaul. really interesting home internet option though

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Posted · Original PosterOP
8 hours ago, williamcll said:

Not really useful for consumer internet though.

Currently. This could completely change how the backhaul is handled. Better backhaul means better service for us plebs

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13 hours ago, TempestCatto said:

Meanwhile people who live in more remote areas (like me) will be stuck with the same ISP, the same shitty speeds, and shite service all because no one else dare lay line out this far or underground.

That because it cost toooooo much money to do so. The ISP expects a ROI in a reasonable amount of time. 

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15 hours ago, TempestCatto said:

Meanwhile people who live in more remote areas (like me) will be stuck with the same ISP, the same shitty speeds, and shite service all because no one else dare lay line out this far or underground.

Honestly I wouldn't be too concerned about Fiber... Last mile fixed wireless is pretty damn good these days. I've got a antenna on my place, a relay on top of a hill (using solar, a battery, inverter, and Ubiquiti gear), and an antenna on my parents place and I'm reliably getting 300-400mbps over 10 miles. 

 

They used to be able to only get ADSL2 and speeds were poor because it was a rural village exchange which got congested at 5pm. Since then they get VDSL2+ with 60+ mbps speeds so it's really no longer needed, but the wireless solution is still faster with my gigabit fiber. It's also kind of fun having an off-site backup.


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