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williamcll

Got to find a way to bleed heat off our 14 - Intel to showcase new laptop coolers

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Intel-to-Introduce-New-Laptop-Thermal-Mo

It will be demonstrated at the upcoming CES 2020 as part of project Athena.

Quote

At the upcoming CES 2020, Intel is planning to announce a new thermal module design that is able to enhance notebooks' heat dissipation by 25-30% with many brands also set to showcase products using the innovation during the show, according to sources from the upstream supply chain. The new thermal design is part of Intel's Project Athena and consists of a combination of vapor chambers and graphite sheets.

 

Traditionally, thermal modules are placed in the compartment between the keyboard exterior part and the bottom shell as most key components that generate heat are located there. But Intel's design will replace the traditional thermal modules with a vapor chamber and attach it with a graphite sheet that is placed behind the screen area for stronger heat dissipation. The hinges will also need to be re-designed to allow the graphite sheet to go through in order to conduct heat. The new design will allow vendors to create fanless notebooks and can further shrink notebooks' thickness. Many brand vendors have expressed interest in developing such products and are set to showcase related notebooks at CES 2020.

 

In addition to traditional clamshell notebooks, the new thermal module can also be applied to foldable notebook devices. Vapor chambers have seen increased adoption in the past two years and have mostly been used in gaming models that require stronger heat dissipation. Compared to traditional heat pipe thermal module solutions, vapor chambers can be crafted into irregular shapes, allowing a broader coverage on hardware. At the moment, Intel's thermal module design is only suitable for notebooks that open at a maximum angle of 180 degrees and not models featuring 360-degree rotatable screen as the graphite sheet will expose from the hinge area and affect overall industrial design. Some hinge makers pointed out that the issue is currently being fixed and will have a good chance to be resolved in the near future.

Source: https://www.digitimes.com/news/a20191225PD208.html

Thoughts: Heating has always been an issue for most if not all gaming laptops and often take expensive bulky setups to solve (such as the mothership and the GX700 from Asus), perhaps these designs could also incorporated into desktop coolers as well. 


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It sounds like something aimed more at the ultralight notebooks, I can see how it could be used as some auxilary heat dissipation system in gaming laptops, but given the description of how it's meant to work, it wouldn't be able to replace a standard active system, since gaming laptop components produce too much heat to be dissipated just through a sheet of graphite on the back of a monitor.

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12 minutes ago, FIREMAN101 said:

I would like to ask you if you could summarise the news in a 'TL;DR' at the bottom of your articles please.

no, this is the news section. if you dont want to read 3 paragraphs, then this sub forum isn't for you

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Its not going to work in the Back screen because when folded too many times the graphite sheet will break eventually.

Instead they could just use the bottom o the ultrabook made of thin aluminum as giant bottom passive sink with graphite sheet, and if it works add one in the back of the monitor aswell.

Regardless its going to be extremely expensive and only intel exclusive so im not interested in exlusive garbage.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
4 hours ago, Arika S said:

no, this is the news section. if you dont want to read 3 paragraphs, then this sub forum isn't for you

I was actually recently reminded to not post the entire article onto the forum. 


Specs: Motherboard: Asus X470-PLUS TUF gaming (Yes I know it's poor but I wasn't informed) RAM: Corsair VENGEANCE® LPX DDR4 3200Mhz CL16-18-18-36 2x8GB

            CPU: Ryzen 7 2700X @ 4.2Ghz          Case: Antec P8     PSU: G.Storm GS850                        Cooler: Antec K240 with two Noctura Industrial PPC 3000 PWM

            Drives: Samsung 970 EVO plus 250GB, Micron 1100 2TB, Seagate ST4000DM000/1F2168 GPU: EVGA RTX 2080 ti Black edition @ 2Ghz

                                                                                                                             

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Interesting. Mainly for the gaming laptops. If I'm not wrong, don't razer currently use vapor chamber cooling for their laptops? Would be cool to see how it compares to a traditional design.

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7 minutes ago, TheUberMedic said:

Interesting. Mainly for the gaming laptops. If I'm not wrong, don't razer currently use vapor chamber cooling for their laptops? Would be cool to see how it compares to a traditional design.

Everyone uses vapour chamber. But in traditional design, it's just at the bottom of the laptop and it leads to a fan which would then push out the heat.

 

If I understood correctly, the design Intel is talking about is attaching a graphite sheet to the vapor chamber tubes, the former of which stretches all the way from the bottom of the laptop to the entire back of the screen, significantly increasing the heat dissipation area. Obviously questions like how the graphite sheet will go through the hinge and how durable the hinge will be will hopefully be answered soon at CES

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Getting anything thermally conductive enough to withstand a repeated laptop hinge bend has been what has kept this kind of thing from being used before.  It’s sort of a laptop cooling great white whale.

Graphite is rather famous for not bending all that well.  Graphene will bend like that but it’s mono molecular thickness makes it questionable how much heat it could actually move.

 

we shall see what we shall see.


Life is like a bowl of chocolates: there are all these little crinkly paper cups everywhere.

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So if I understand correctly, they are using the surface area behind the screen to dissipate heat. The heat transfer is done through Graphite sheet through the hinges?

 

I wonder if the heat near the screen would impact screen longevity? Also, would the hinges get really hot? The amount of heat that can be dissipated this way probably depends on the thickness of the hinges.

 

Interesting concept at least.

 

 

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If they can make flexible fibre hoses that can withstand 6000PSI, then a bit of silicon tube for a heat tube shouldn't be too much to ask. 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

Sometimes I miss contractions like n't on the end of words like wouldn't, couldn't and shouldn't.    Please don't be a dick,  make allowances when reading my posts.

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On 12/28/2019 at 10:55 AM, williamcll said:

Intel-to-Introduce-New-Laptop-Thermal-Mo

It will be demonstrated at the upcoming CES 2020 as part of project Athena.

Source: https://www.digitimes.com/news/a20191225PD208.html

Thoughts: Heating has always been an issue for most if not all gaming laptops and often take expensive bulky setups to solve (such as the mothership and the GX700 from Asus), perhaps these designs could also incorporated into desktop coolers as well. 

so it dissipates heat by pushing the heat in the display area? can someone explain i dont even know what u mean im dumb

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