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MyLittleFella

New Router

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Guys, I'm thinking of buying a new router to install here at home because my current device has no bandwidth control, so every time I'm playing a game someone from my house downloads something and f*ck me up w/ the ping.

My current device is a AIO wifi router modem, which makes ADSL connection with my ISP  25Mbps (Yes I still use it, my parents pay so I don't argue here... It's f*cked I know). The question: My device operates in the 10.0.x.x range, and the router will probably come in 192.168.x.x range as default ... I was wondering if I should leave the two of 'em in the same IP range or should I leave it separate. Obviously I will have a DHCP conflict but I can disable DHCP from one of 'em.

 

Thanks.

 

 

Note: I won't have more than 15 devices connect to the Network, so I don't have to worry with subnet mask and bla bla bla.


CPU: Intel Core i7 7700k @ 4.2 GHz Stock; Mobo: Asus TUF Z270 MARK 2; RAM: HyperX Fury 1x16GB DDR4 @ 2400MHz; GPU: GTX 1080 - GIGABYTE TURBO OC; Case: pcyes Polar Bear; Storage: Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB + Seagate Barracuda 2TB 7200RPM 64MB Cache; Cooling: Deepcool 240T; PSU: CX750M 2015

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First of all whenever you double NAT you want to be in different subnets. If you plan on getting a router, better to just change the modem to bridged. 

 

Second is how are you planning to control bandwidth? 

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20 minutes ago, MyLittleFella said:

Guys, I'm thinking of buying a new router to install here at home because my current device has no bandwidth control, so every time I'm playing a game someone from my house downloads something and f*ck me up w/ the ping.

My current device is a AIO wifi router modem, which makes ADSL connection with my ISP  25Mbps (Yes I still use it, my parents pay so I don't argue here... It's f*cked I know). The question: My device operates in the 10.0.x.x range, and the router will probably come in 192.168.x.x range as default ... I was wondering if I should leave the two of 'em in the same IP range or should I leave it separate. Obviously I will have a DHCP conflict but I can disable DHCP from one of 'em.

 

Thanks.

 

 

Note: I won't have more than 15 devices connect to the Network, so I don't have to worry with subnet mask and bla bla bla.

Most routers that you buy off the shelf will allow you to set whatever LAN IP range that you want.

 

The problem comes in when you attach this router and it sees another router on the network (your AIO device/gateway). Each will want to do the duties of the other which will end up in a network conflict. What you need to do here is, if your gateway device allows, activate "bridge" mode, directly connect it via ethernet to your new router and configure it as you would for router responsibilities, QOS, wireless, etc. Your client devices would connect to the new router's AP and have all the finer details of network traffic management be managed by the new router; the gateway is only there to get the new router onto the DSL connection.

 

Of course, achieving the above requires that you are able to log into the AIO gateway's admin page. Hopefully you know the username/password. Not all gateways will allow you to activate "bridge" mode easily. I use a cable ISP that provided one such device. So what I did was enter the gateway's configuration, manually turned off its WiFi, and assigned a static IP to the MAC address of my new "router". Then I directly connected my new router via ethernet to the gateway, configured the new router how I wanted (including setting my own LAN addresses, etc.) and that was it! Effectively, I didn't want the gateway to hand out an automatically-assigned IP to my new router every time the lease expired because all of my client devices would disconnect. I'd suggest you make this new network on a completely different subnet from the one on the AIO gateway.

 

So far it's been working perfectly for my situation. I used a Ubiquiti Edgerouter X-SFP to do the routing/firewall/QOS and 2 Ubiquiti UAP-ACs for access points. After configuring the Edgerouter's QOS I was amazed at how responsive the network became especially when multiple clients were connected.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, mynameisjuan said:

First of all whenever you double NAT you want to be in different subnets. If you plan on getting a router, better to just change the modem to bridged. 

 

Second is how are you planning to control bandwidth? 

i'll give my brother 2048Kbps of speed for upstream and downstream.


CPU: Intel Core i7 7700k @ 4.2 GHz Stock; Mobo: Asus TUF Z270 MARK 2; RAM: HyperX Fury 1x16GB DDR4 @ 2400MHz; GPU: GTX 1080 - GIGABYTE TURBO OC; Case: pcyes Polar Bear; Storage: Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB + Seagate Barracuda 2TB 7200RPM 64MB Cache; Cooling: Deepcool 240T; PSU: CX750M 2015

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2 hours ago, MyLittleFella said:

i'll give my brother 2048Kbps of speed for upstream and downstream.

Upload is most of the problem though. With adsl and only a meg upload, you’re problems aren’t going away. If you go even lower you’re just going to make the problem worse with retransmission for longer periods.

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