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The Lorax got his trees last week, now it's Nessie's turn.......introducing The Ocean Cleanup INTERCEPTOR

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Posted · Original PosterOP

The Lorax got his trees last week (5 million to go!) so now it's Nessie's turn.......introducing The Ocean Cleanup INTERCEPTORTM

 

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More pics & how it works:

Spoiler

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TheOceanCleanup-Interceptor-How-it-works

 

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And the most amazing thing is that Interceptor 001 & 002 have been already operational for more than year meaning that more than 20 MILLION kilograms of trash has already been collected out of the Cengkareng Drain and Klang River! ^_^

 

In addition to deploying more booms in the Pacific Garbage Patch, The Ocean Cleanup aims to have all the world's one-thousand most trash filled rivers under control in 5 years (by the end of the Paris Climate Agreement in 2025).

 

More coverage & information:

More on the Paris Agreement and strategies to keep us on-target:

 

 

To a happier Lorax, Nessie, and Mother Earth! 🌲🦕🌊 🌎 👍

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19 minutes ago, VegetableStu said:

sweet, now do space trash. before earth gets Kepler Syndrome :c

In hindsight, there really should have been an international rule that says anything you launch has to either a) leave orbit and not come back, b) burn itself up in some predetermined number of years, or c) get collected by a subsequent mission within a predetermined number of years (once it is no longer functional of course).

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10 minutes ago, Ryan_Vickers said:

c) get collected by a subsequent mission within a predetermined number of years (once it is no longer functional of course)

kinda, there are graveyard orbits for crafts that are too far away to deorbit. 

10 minutes ago, Ryan_Vickers said:

a) leave orbit and not come back,

believe this is a prerequesite now for medium high orbit objects. could be wrong tho. 

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1 minute ago, GoldenLag said:

kinda, there are graveyard orbits for crafts that are too far away to deorbit. 

believe this is a prerequesite now for medium high orbit objects. could be wrong tho. 

I suppose the next issue will be so many legitimate satellites it happens anyway just because of them, even if there wasn't any trash xD

 

It's kind of unfortunate, compared to the ocean trash issue, preventing space trash would have been a lot easier, but cleaning it up is probably going to be just as hard or worse.  I don't have figures but I'd assume there's a lot less in space, but getting there to do anything about it is a lot more expensive.

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16 minutes ago, Ryan_Vickers said:

preventing space trash would have been a lot easier,

especially with the introduction of ion engines. 

 

a simple compact ion truster could quite easily provide the delta v needed to deorbit most crafts. doesnt need to use the heavier and more expencive xeon gas, just something that doesnt go through containers. 

 

 

edit: or use the Juno solution that was used due to issues with the main propulsion. 

https://www.realclearscience.com/articles/2019/10/31/juno_jumps_the_shadow_to_avoid_mission_failure_111155.html

yes they used RCS trusters to do the burn essentially. 

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59 minutes ago, Results45 said:

Nessie

that damn sea monster owes me $3.50, that bastard was crafty at scamming me in exactly $3.50...

DON'T TRUST HIM!!!!!!

these poor people got scammed here.

D O N ' T  L E T  I T  H A P P E N  T O  O T H E R S ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !


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I once wrote a fan fiction between Luke and Dennis for Luke on one of his streams, he never read it, I SPENT 15MIN ON THAT!!!! (read it here: test1.docx )

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On 11/7/2019 at 1:38 AM, Ryan_Vickers said:

In hindsight, there really should have been an international rule that says anything you launch has to either a) leave orbit and not come back, b) burn itself up in some predetermined number of years, or c) get collected by a subsequent mission within a predetermined number of years (once it is no longer functional of course).

To my knowledge most nations (or at least the major ones who have been in space for decades) already have policies to either deorbit their craft or shift them to graveyard orbits. The problem is accidents happen and craft either lose their propulsion systems or they are impacted by existing debris (which can be dangerous even down to the scale of metallic particles of leftover rocket propellant). 

 

Although it's a serious problem, there's really not a whole lot we can do about it short of designing craft with enough redundancy and resiliency to take the brunt of the smaller impacts, and better tracking systems to allow us to dodge the bigger debris. Maybe someday we'll have autonomous ion powered drones that can hang around collecting and deorbiting derelict craft, but unless we find a away to deal with the borderline microscopic particles whipping around up there, it's basically impossible to keep it properly "clean". 

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On 11/7/2019 at 2:38 AM, Ryan_Vickers said:

In hindsight, there really should have been an international rule that says anything you launch has to either a) leave orbit and not come back, b) burn itself up in some predetermined number of years, or c) get collected by a subsequent mission within a predetermined number of years (once it is no longer functional of course).

None of those rules account for things like 3mm paint flecks traveling at 25,000mph.

 

IIRC (and I'm looking for the story now) one of the shuttles had an issue where a main engine cone was dented SEVERELY by a ridiculously tiny paint fleck, traveling at enormous speeds.

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Now we just need a bunch of those things for every river on earth.  And to stop dumping stuff in them in the first place of course.  And a viable carbon solution.  And an ocean solution. And I’m not sure how much good those trees did.  

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I looked at all the images and still don’t quite understand how it works. Is that long trail stretching out from it a net that is funnelling rubbish in to the conveyor?

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, FunkmastaFlex said:

SAVE THE BEES SAVE THE TREES SAVE THE SEAS

                                                          🐝                                                      🐝

Did someone say BEEZ? 🐝                                                               🐝

                                                           🐝                                                                🐝

                                                                 🐝                                                       🐝

                                                                     🐝                                          🐝

                                                                   🐝                                     🐝

                                                              🐝                                     🐝 

                                                            🐝                                  🐝

                                                                🐝                      🐝

                                                                     🐝        🐝

                                                                           🐝

*Cards Against Humanity meme

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On 11/7/2019 at 1:53 AM, Ryan_Vickers said:

It's kind of unfortunate, compared to the ocean trash issue, preventing space trash would have been a lot easier, but cleaning it up is probably going to be just as hard or worse.  I don't have figures but I'd assume there's a lot less in space, but getting there to do anything about it is a lot more expensive.

The problem with trash in space isn't so much the whole craft or even the large debris. We can and do track those: Here's a live map of space debris that is currently tracked.

The big problem with space trash is the small stuff, literally. Fasteners, weights, gaskets... Spacecraft often intentionally drop these kind of things along their way. Consider the Frangible nut: a nut type fastener that is able to be explosively split in half using a small amount of high speed explosive. The only problem is that now you have two untrackable, bullet sized, metal objects that are flying as fast or faster than anything on Earth, and that can do some serious damage to spacecraft.

These things are virtually uncollectable.


"Ultimately, saying that you don’t care about privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different from saying you don’t care about freedom of speech because you have nothing to say." ~Verax

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4 hours ago, Trik'Stari said:

 

 

6 hours ago, Waffles13 said:

 

 

1 hour ago, straight_stewie said:

 

 

Fair enough, I hadn't considered the amount of unavoidable debris that breaks off of everything for various reasons and for sure that stuff, though tiny, is still very dangerous

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1 hour ago, schwellmo92 said:

I looked at all the images and still don’t quite understand how it works. Is that long trail stretching out from it a net that is funnelling rubbish in to the conveyor?

Indeed.  Check out the video in the OP.  Boyan demonstrates it using some rubber ducks.  Go to 9:55-ish

At 15:55 he starts explaining how they can use these without blocking off entire rivers (which would interfere with boats etc).  Strategic placement is key.

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For some reason when I scanned over the title I saw Jensen Interceptor....and I got excited.

Then I remembered this isn't a car forum.

...much disappoint.


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Posted · Original PosterOP

.

18 hours ago, schwellmo92 said:

I looked at all the images and still don’t quite understand how it works. Is that long trail stretching out from it a net that is funnelling rubbish in to the conveyor?

16 hours ago, Captain Chaos said:

Indeed.  Check out the video in the OP.  Boyan demonstrates it using some rubber ducks.  Go to 9:55-ish

At 15:55 he starts explaining how they can use these without blocking off entire rivers (which would interfere with boats etc).  Strategic placement is key.

 

Yep. They basically place their collection barges in the path of the river where the vast majority of the garbage flows:

 

It's both hilarious and genius of them to demonstrate using rubber duckies and an actual text message from the machine saying "I'M STUFFED!"

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3rd world countries will still dump into the ocean/watersheds to save money

even canadian cities dump straight into the ocean and st laurence river

imagine what toxics and nuclear waste from other countries are being dumped

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