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Admins Angry at Attempted Anarchy - Microsoft planning to give Office 365 users ability to bypass their admins and buy their own addons

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Posted · Original PosterOP
3 hours ago, leadeater said:

Well I no longer have to care anymore, good luck everyone else ?

Lucky you ?


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54 minutes ago, spartaman64 said:

they have enough knowledge to install them. and you can still refuse to support it and hang up. if they use the company credit card fire them. and this goes back to if it helps them so much that they would shell out their own money why are you not providing them with it in the first place

I want to live in your utopia :o at most workplaces there are a bunch of kevins and karens.. You also overestimate the power of sysadmins xD  we don't decide who gets fired. The smallest dispute can drag on for days and eventually the end user almost always gets his/her way. End users are special creatures. We have multiple employees who insist on needing the highest spec macbook pro, just to browse the web, edit small xlsx and .docx files and maybe do a small edit to a picture.

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7 hours ago, spartaman64 said:

if they do not have to be installed then they are already installed. i dont see how they are creating a security issue if they are already on the computer

It's Office 365, much of it in the backend is actually SharePoint (even OneDrive is just a SharePoint document library in essence) and is delivered by web presence. Microsoft Office Suite and Microsoft Office 365 Suite can connect to Microsoft Office 365 services but these are not actually the same thing. Both are just Office Application Suite under different license scheme and are not part of the Office 365 service. For example you do not need to install an on prem Microsoft Exchange Server to use Microsoft Office 365 email services, just like you don't need to install anything to use Microsoft PowerBI (you can).

 

They aren't already installed, there is nothing to install to start using many of the Office 365 services. I mean you don't say Google search engine is already installed do you?

 

Company credit card or personal credit card a user can still purchase a PowerBI license, connect to a confidential information source which can be as simple as an Excel spreadsheet and publish what ever fancy thing/graph/table whatever to people that shouldn't have access to the information within the company or even outside the company and you'd be very hard pressed to know that has been done.

 

That's why Office 365 administrators care, because there actually is data security issues with these tools, administrators aren't just being obstructive and annoying they are exercising due diligence for the area they are responsible and accountable for. Who do you think will end up with the blame if an Office 365 tool causes a data breach? The user that did it or the 'IT expert' who's job it is to prevent it from happening.

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In a large organisation, these payments are likely to be authorised locally, so it is company money spent on IT but not accounted for in the IT budget. So it is not properly being accounted for. Also the license will almost certainly be lost when the local user moves on. And for support, the IT staff may have agreed SLAs with each area to support on "Microsoft applications" or something and would therefore be caught supporting this, even if they did not authorise (and therefore no training on it).

 

It just doesn't really fit in with a large company's IT policy. At all.

 

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It's enough that users can postpone windows update installations..... 


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5 minutes ago, DoctorNick said:

It's enough that users can postpone windows update installations..... 

I'm a junior Linux engineer so correct me if i'm wrong. But I'm pretty sure my colleagues at middle-ware/windows have the ability to force updates and reboots. Only if the workstation is on, otherwise it happens on boot. All depends on how strictly they manage the policies I think.

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12 minutes ago, LeSheen said:

I'm a junior Linux engineer so correct me if i'm wrong. But I'm pretty sure my colleagues at middle-ware/windows have the ability to force updates and reboots. Only if the workstation is on, otherwise it happens on boot. All depends on how strictly they manage the policies I think.

Pretty sure users can ignore major updates like 1903 and simply not install them. You may be able to force this.. But on some systems I have found that you need to login and press restart (in windows update) for it to install the new update.. But thats a bug.


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22 minutes ago, DoctorNick said:

Pretty sure users can ignore major updates like 1903 and simply not install them.

Then you're not using wsus right? 

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2 minutes ago, LeSheen said:

Then you're not using wsus right? 

Yes but i'm not the admin ? I may need a talk with admin


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If they want to shell out the cash on the company card for a Power BI license they weren't approved for, then by all means go for it. They'll have to explain the expense to Finance. if Finance approves it then it's on the business.

INB4 Power BI Admins lose their minds over the crazy amount of nonsense reports taking priority instead of actual business reports. 

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12 hours ago, LeSheen said:

I want to live in your utopia :o at most workplaces there are a bunch of kevins and karens.. You also overestimate the power of sysadmins xD  we don't decide who gets fired. The smallest dispute can drag on for days and eventually the end user almost always gets his/her way. End users are special creatures. We have multiple employees who insist on needing the highest spec macbook pro, just to browse the web, edit small xlsx and .docx files and maybe do a small edit to a picture.

Pretty much tasks a Celeron and SSD system can do woth no sweat. ;)

 


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As a guy who constantly goes around the regular IT channels, I approve. Any manager who has two braincells to rub together will know that an employee who needs an office program should have that program quickly. As long as the employee can justify the reason for it to their manager, there should be less hoops to jump through to get the tools to do your job. 


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On 10/29/2019 at 5:57 PM, VegetableStu said:

but why? o_o unless said enterprise is stingy on not buying Office for their employees?

 

awesome alliteration alltheby

So they can get people to pay them in spite of their sysadmins would be my guess ? though I can't really think of why you'd personally pay for software you need to do your job (unless it's a personal workflow thing but I don't see why that would include office administration tools).


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1 hour ago, Real_PhillBert said:

As a guy who constantly goes around the regular IT channels, I approve. Any manager who has two braincells to rub together will know that an employee who needs an office program should have that program quickly. As long as the employee can justify the reason for it to their manager, there should be less hoops to jump through to get the tools to do your job. 

This is what is called Shadow IT, where typically unapproved IT work is being done (whether large or small) by employees who are otherwise supposed to be doing other tasks.. In this case, as you're going around proper IT to do your job more effectively, Shadow IT isn't so much a problem itself as it is a symptom here.

 

Shadow IT (the most "benign" meaning of it anyway) can arise when the actual IT won't, or are unable to, provide the best tools for employees to do their job. This is a management problem as much as it is IT, and refusal to address this can expose the company to potential security risks. At the same time, outright stamping out measures employees have taken to better do their jobs risks alienating them as well, so care must be taken to satisfy all.


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Knowing how bad some IT departments are and how bad internal communication and joint operating can be, I see this move from Microsoft as a good thing. At least I would have bought and took the time from my freetime to learn to use the PowerBI when I was an intern in one big corporation doing PowerPoints, like fuck that place, basicly getting some graph pulled out of this huge database took at least 2 weeks and most of it was just waiting because there was only 1 or 2 guys with access and tools to pull data and they were the most incompetent and laziest pieces of meat you could find for the job (they were some relatives of one bigger boss so that concludes that) and usually you needed to wait for a week per request and 90% of the time you needed to make another request for the same data because they compiled it in wrong style. And no, they weren't over worked, they were just that bad at their job that I would guess my dead granny would have done their job better after few weeks learning to use computer and couple days of the softwares.

And for the Flow what I think it's about making automation into the workflow and that's restricted for the IT department, just no. At least in Finland so many bigger companies have outsourced IT departments that are just, well, outsourced. Like, for example, my mother works for the government and if her work computer or her workroom mates computer has a problem, she usually calls me because most of the time I, without good knowledge about their softwares and machines, can troubleshoot and find the solution faster than their outsourced IT department that sends a guy from another city to take a look at it within 2-3 workdays and if something is broken it takes them around couple extra days to get replacement part and send a guy again to install it (like after some renovation there was some workman managed to drill/whatever to one VGA-cable and while it took around a week for the real IT department to get replacement cable, it was far faster that I just went and bought one and brought it to my mom and over the phone instructed how to attach it). Oh, and giving those monkeys the only keys to make automation to the workflow, just no, never, don't even think about it. Their skill in making even simple instructions how to take into use a new work phone for office workers from which most of them are around their 40's and 50's was so bad that I wouldn't give them even the possibility to make any kind of tools or scripts for even the solitare (they knew for who they were making those instructions and that they needed to be very simple and idiotproof and they managed to make instructions that even I had trouble to follow because they were so full of technical jargon and skipping "simple steps" like where and how should you download the specific for their use only made apps and just skipped to the part where they are setup for working).

 

E: And I don't mean that every IT/BigData department is that bad, but that there are cases where allowing more than just those departments have access to their tools would streamline workflow and possibly create solutions that are generally a lot better that "the nerds" can come up with.

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Working for a company who does not have a dedicated full-time IT department, but rather, contracted out, it is a pain in the @SS.

 

IT should have control / restrictions on "ordinary" staff, but for people like me in Dev / Engineering, it is a headache.

I need to update MATLAB - blocked.

I need to install SW or update Python to the latest version - blocked.

I need to download / install software to modify or program this ASIC / FPGA - blocked.

 

The company's $250K product delivery to a customer is delayed by 2 weeks because of IT.

Great.

 


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On 10/31/2019 at 11:24 PM, -rascal- said:

Working for a company who does not have a dedicated full-time IT department, but rather, contracted out, it is a pain in the @SS.

 

IT should have control / restrictions on "ordinary" staff, but for people like me in Dev / Engineering, it is a headache.

I need to update MATLAB - blocked.

I need to install SW or update Python to the latest version - blocked.

I need to download / install software to modify or program this ASIC / FPGA - blocked.

 

The company's $250K product delivery to a customer is delayed by 2 weeks because of IT.

Great.

 

I have done support in multiple organisations. And I am now full time employed in an environment where I support every linux user.

 

The delays are a result of the ITIL method most of the time and are frustrating. But in my experience developers often think they are more skilled in certain areas then they actually are. Developing software and maintaining a stable environment are two different skill sets. Most of the issues we have to fix around here are introduced when a developer thinks he is a capable sysadmin as well. I don't push code to your project you don't mess up my environment ;) .

 

There are multiple reasons why changes can't be done (immediately). Not all of those reasons are as obvious...

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11 hours ago, LeSheen said:

I have done support in multiple organisations. And I am now full time employed in an environment where I support every linux user.

 

The delays are a result of the ITIL method most of the time and are frustrating. But in my experience developers often think they are more skilled in certain areas then they actually are. Developing software and maintaining a stable environment are two different skill sets. Most of the issues we have to fix around here are introduced when a developer thinks he is a capable sysadmin as well. I don't push code to your project you don't mess up my environment ;) .

 

There are multiple reasons why changes can't be done (immediately). Not all of those reasons are as obvious...

 

Fair.

 

Now that I think about it again, I have worked on the IT/support side of a big organisation (e.g. general IT support, software, AD / LDAP, account management for a University), and yes, when people try to find their own workarounds, and break things, that is a problem too. I do agree with you, that a stable environment is important, and that itself is hard to manage.

 

If people want to things on their own, then they should be on their own as far as support goes.

To me, that seems fair enough.

I guess that is why IT ended up throwing us into a separate AD group, and giving us admin privileges. 


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Anarchy you say?

 


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On 10/31/2019 at 6:24 PM, -rascal- said:

Working for a company who does not have a dedicated full-time IT department, but rather, contracted out, it is a pain in the @SS.

 

IT should have control / restrictions on "ordinary" staff, but for people like me in Dev / Engineering, it is a headache.

I need to update MATLAB - blocked.

I need to install SW or update Python to the latest version - blocked.

I need to download / install software to modify or program this ASIC / FPGA - blocked.

 

The company's $250K product delivery to a customer is delayed by 2 weeks because of IT.

Great.

Sounds like a problem with the structure of your specific IT team's implementation. That's an organizational problem. You need local admin, most likely.

20 hours ago, -rascal- said:

Fair.

 

Now that I think about it again, I have worked on the IT/support side of a big organisation (e.g. general IT support, software, AD / LDAP, account management for a University), and yes, when people try to find their own workarounds, and break things, that is a problem too. I do agree with you, that a stable environment is important, and that itself is hard to manage.

 

If people want to things on their own, then they should be on their own as far as support goes.

To me, that seems fair enough.

 

20 hours ago, -rascal- said:

I guess that is why IT ended up throwing us into a separate AD group, and giving us admin privileges. 

And this was likely the solution all along - though I hope they gave you local admin privileges, and didn't do the lazy thing (which is simply adding you to the domain admin group).

 

Locking down a workstation to limit what a user can do is standard operating procedure - but there can and will be exceptions, where specific users need to do tasks that will require them to have a local admin account to perform (such as yourself, regularly updating software, etc).


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On 10/31/2019 at 6:24 PM, -rascal- said:

Working for a company who does not have a dedicated full-time IT department, but rather, contracted out, it is a pain in the @SS.

 

IT should have control / restrictions on "ordinary" staff, but for people like me in Dev / Engineering, it is a headache.

I need to update MATLAB - blocked.

I need to install SW or update Python to the latest version - blocked.

I need to download / install software to modify or program this ASIC / FPGA - blocked.

 

The company's $250K product delivery to a customer is delayed by 2 weeks because of IT.

Great.

 

As @dalekphalm mentionned, the problem lies within the organization and how things are handled inside of it in your case. Unfortunately, if the external IT team mandate is just to make sure everything work to keep IT cost at a minimum, locking everything down is a "great way" to do it and you should not expect anymore from them. That's a business decision they took.

The overall mentality varies from companies to companies regarding permissions. Some cares, some don't, some only want to cut cost. I've been catapulted in the middle of so many situations over the last 10 years, from completely locked down environments to wide open environments, that I can say openly that I prefer a locked down environment, especially if I'm the only one dealing with that said environment for a while. Usually it revolves around poor GPO/security planning/implementation in the first place anyway. At least it gives me time to work on them instead of having to do some sort of system restore because the CEO decided to catch a cryptolocker while watching a russian porn website on working hours.

 

On a personal administrator level, after I'm done cleaning AD / creating/modifying GPOs / managing security/permissions, you better have a really good reason and good arguments to back that reason for me to give you special permissions ;).


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9 minutes ago, Tribalinius said:

As @dalekphalm mentionned, the problem lies within the organization and how things are handled inside of it in your case. Unfortunately, if the external IT team mandate is just to make sure everything work to keep IT cost at a minimum, locking everything down is a "great way" to do it and you should not expect anymore from them. That's a business decision they took.

The overall mentality varies from companies to companies regarding permissions. Some cares, some don't, some only want to cut cost. I've been catapulted in the middle of so many situations over the last 10 years, from completely locked down environments to wide open environments, that I can say openly that I prefer a locked down environment, especially if I'm the only one dealing with that said environment for a while. Usually it revolves around poor GPO/security planning/implementation in the first place anyway. At least it gives me time to work on them instead of having to do some sort of system restore because the CEO decided to catch a cryptolocker while watching a russian porn website on working hours.

 

On a personal administrator level, after I'm done cleaning AD / creating/modifying GPOs / managing security/permissions, you better have a really good reason and good arguments to back that reason for me to give you special permissions ;).

The reality of things is that you don't have a fits all solutions. In his case, dev should be fully unlocked. Going with "I want really good arguments" is exactly what encourage bypassing of IT. Many people here have the competence to do so, and make sure no trace are left. You should be arguing onto why you are alone/lack of staff. And the company should hire devs (or whatever role needs freedom in using their system day to day), with competences in it. (Not an idiot that visit virus.com to get the daily latest virus, of you catch my I am trying to say). You should working with employees, not against. You are part of their ye as much as others. If you have a quick channel on place for program updates and installs, and have select users groups for Admin rights for them to do updates of apps and OS that have update daily or weekly, or use tools that needs admin rihhts to run to be able to do it's things, then let them be able to do so.

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2 minutes ago, adman29 said:

O365 has addons? That're paid?

Wtf

You also have a Store for extensions on some apps like Outlook

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