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1832vin

python to make this:

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Posted · Original PosterOP

here's a clip:

i'm familiar with programming, can't say expert, or good at it...

learning python

any tutorials for how to make games as simple as this?

only one command, auto-regenerate (the pipes) auto scrool, gravity...... etc.

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First, it's not that simple.

Second, learn basic Python. It'll help a lot. The Python tutorial is a good place to start: http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/

Third, pygame is probably the library you're looking for to create simple 2D games. You'll need to do quite a bit of the work yourself (specifically graphical stuff), and then take advantage of any of the library tools to do the coding. Once you've learned Python, learn pygame: http://pygame.org/news.html

 

That should get you started. 

 

There are many other Game development modules/libraries for Python: https://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonGameLibraries


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First, it's not that simple.

It gets easier once you make your first game though.


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It gets easier once you make your first game though.

I was mostly referring to: "only one command, auto-regenerate (the pipes) auto scrool, gravity...... etc."

But yes, once you have a working framework for a basic game, it can be adapted to other games as well, making the process easier the second time. 


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First, it's not that simple.

Second, learn basic Python. It'll help a lot. The Python tutorial is a good place to start: http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/

Third, pygame is probably the library you're looking for to create simple 2D games. You'll need to do quite a bit of the work yourself (specifically graphical stuff), and then take advantage of any of the library tools to do the coding. Once you've learned Python, learn pygame: http://pygame.org/news.html

 

That should get you started. 

 

There are many other Game development modules/libraries for Python: https://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonGameLibraries

 

 

I'd recommend not using the python 2 tutorial and going straight to version 3 of the python language; why learn something old when you can learn it's replacement?

 

But yeah, the game would probably be achievable using a library like PyGame once you get used to the Python language itself.

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I'd recommend not using the python 2 tutorial and going straight to version 3 of the python language; why learn something old when you can learn it's replacement?

 

But yeah, the game would probably be achievable using a library like PyGame once you get used to the Python language itself.

Actually, it's better to learn both. Large number of 3rd party modules are made for Python 2 that have yet to support Python 3. Non-issue though, as Pygame supports Python 3. 


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Actually, it's better to learn both. Large number of 3rd party modules are made for Python 2 that have yet to support Python 3. Non-issue though, as Pygame supports Python 3. 

 

By all means, I would agree to keep mindful of the incompatibilities between the two versions, but I would always recommend picking up the newer version for future-proofing. I think most libraries are catching up on version 3 now.

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By all means, I would agree to keep mindful of the incompatibilities between the two versions, but I would always recommend picking up the newer version for future-proofing. I think most libraries are catching up on version 3 now.

Python 3 is not the future or "FUTURE PROOF" and all the stuff it does can be done in python 2 as for the libraries most of them are compatible with both or can be made compatible by various means .

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Python 3 is not the future or "FUTURE PROOF" and all the stuff it does can be done in python 2 as for the libraries most of them are compatible with both or can be made compatible by various means .

 

Well, it kind of is the future, given that Python 2.7 is the final release of version 2 of Python.. so yeah. By future-proof I simply meant not having to learn Python 2 and then when the vast majority of developers leave it behind in favour of supported version that will continue to receive updates, being stuck with a less favourable version of the language.

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First, it's not that simple.

Second, learn basic Python. It'll help a lot. The Python tutorial is a good place to start: http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/

Third, pygame is probably the library you're looking for to create simple 2D games. You'll need to do quite a bit of the work yourself (specifically graphical stuff), and then take advantage of any of the library tools to do the coding. Once you've learned Python, learn pygame: http://pygame.org/news.html

 

That should get you started. 

 

There are many other Game development modules/libraries for Python: https://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonGameLibraries

Meh it's not that simple considering that the original developer himself failed to use realistic physics, joking actually it's not hard at all to develop a game like that especially if you create it in java.

I know that op's request to make it in python but since python is generally a simpler language to learn it shouldn't be any harder.

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