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VikingGamer

Ryzen 3900X+NVMe no boot devices/ntoskrln.exe

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Posted · Original PosterOP

So I've decided to dig up my old LTT account for this, because I really do not know what to do at this point...

 

So I've purchased a new rig;

 

ASUS ROG Strix X570-E GAMING

AMD Ryzen 3900X

Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz

Corsair MP600 Gen4 NVMe SSD

 

I've also got an Gigabyte GTX1070 Windforce OC 8GB

 

 

I've decided that I wanted to do a fresh install of Windows 10 via purchased USB stick, to the NVMe. So I connected the NVMe as the only drive, to ensure that the installation would prioritize the drive.

The problem is that when I go into BIOS, there is no way to boot from either the NVMe nor the USB stick, they do not appear in the boot menu. Looking around in the BIOS though, the drives are recognized.

 

So I tried to switch to the CSM mode (Compatibility Support Module) to see if that works, and now both drives do appear fine. So I'm thinking; "Fine, I'll install it this way and switch back to UEFI afterwards."

 

The problem is that when I boot to the USB drive in CSM mode, I get an error when trying to start the installation; 

 

"The operating could not be loaded, the kernel is missing or contains errors"

"File:\Windows\System32\ntoskrnl.exe"

 

I've searched far and wide on the web for any answers, but my head is getting really overloaded with all of these new terms, so I would appreciate some help in fixing this. :)

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Yeah, I'm using my other SSD which still has Windows. The USB drive is recognized and looks fine in Windows Explorer.

 

EDIT: Sorry didn't see that you wrote BIOS. Will check

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Before a new installation try to format the nvme disk. The problem could be due to a windows boot loader with incorrect configuration in the efi partition of the nvme disk.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Okay, so I would format the NVMe in Windows with Disk manager, right? I don't understand why the USB stick doesn't show up though.

 

I have a seperate 4GB USB pen which is FAT-32, and that is recognized by BIOS in UEFI mode. Super confused... ?

I will try to format the NVMe disk then.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I formatted the NVMe drive, and went into BIOS and disabled CSM. The Windows USB was still not bootable, neither was the NVMe. What's strange is that my Windows SSD is not showing up as bootable either, which makes me suspect that there is a component that "blocks" UEFI. Is that possible? Sorry if it's a noob question.

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Let's try to change something, as the usb stick creates problems. For now, leave the USB stick. Try formatting the nvme disk again. Then it creates a windows usb by downloading its image from here.
Then see if the usb you created is detected by the bios. Also in the bios, establish that the usb is the first boot disk. Restart the pc and install windows. Restart the PC and go back into the bios and set the nvme disk as the first boot disk. Restart the system, windows should start. Use the product key code of windows of the usb stick.

Let me know if it resolves or not, we'll try to invent something else.

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How-to-use-Rufus-to-install-Windows-10.p

2 hours ago, mionome12 said:

Let's try to change something, as the usb stick creates problems. For now, leave the USB stick. Try formatting the nvme disk again. Then it creates a windows usb by downloading its image from here.
Then see if the usb you created is detected by the bios. Also in the bios, establish that the usb is the first boot disk. Restart the pc and install windows. Restart the PC and go back into the bios and set the nvme disk as the first boot disk. Restart the system, windows should start. Use the product key code of windows of the usb stick.

Let me know if it resolves or not, we'll try to invent something else.

Read this:

How to use Rufus to install Windows 10 with UEFI support

Quote

Rufus is one of the best USB bootable software. This article will guide you how to use Rufus to install Windows 10 that supports both UEFI and Legacy.

 

Rufus

 

This tool has a long history of development (from 2011), Rufus 3.4 is currently the latest version updated in 2018. Personally I like this tool because it’s lightweight, simple and easy to use.

Rufus is a simple and easy to use tool, just download and run the tool to create bootable USB. You can easily use Rufus to create Windows 10 bootable USB and many other operating systems including Windows XP, Windows 7, 8, 8.1, Ubuntu and many other Linux distributions.

Rufus offers many great features but it also has limitations.

  • Only supports USB (not tested with SDcards). This tool does not support hard drive (HDD) and external hard drive. If you want to create a bootable hard drive or an external hard drive, Rufus is not the choice.
  •  Rufus is not a multiboot tool. This tool does not support creating multiboot usb with multiple ISO files, and can not have multiple operating systems on USB unless the ISO file supports it. Rufus requires reformatting the USB drive for each use.
  •  Not supported on Windows XP. Rufus 3.0 is no longer supported on Windows XP. You need to use older versions or other tools in this case.

Create Windows 10 bootable USB

 

Rufus is lightweight and easy to use. Here are the detailed steps on how to use Rufus to install Windows 10 for beginners. First, download the latest version of Rufus here and then run the software to get started.

 

Choose the right options according to your needs:

 

UEFI only:

    Partition scheme: GPT
    Target system: UEFI (non CSM)
    File system: FAT32

Legacy BIOS only:

    Partition scheme: MBR
    Target system: BIOS (or UEFI-CSM)
    File system: NTFS

Dual UEFI + Legacy BIOS:

    Press “Alt + E“
    Partition scheme: MBR
    Target system: BIOS or UEFI
    File system: FAT32
    If the ISO file contains files larger than 4GB, choose NTFS.

 

By default, Rufus will not support booting in both UEFI and Legacy (BIOS). Press ALT + E to enable this option. Rufus also supports creating two NTFS partitions to store files larger than 4GB and FAT32 to boot UEFI.

  1. Select the USB drive you want to create under Device. All data on this drive will be lost, including other partitions on the hard disk of this partition.
  2. Click the SELECT button and select the ISO file on your computer.
  3. Image Option: You can install Windows onto USB drive with Rufus’s Windows To Go option. Or select Standard Windows Installation to create the installer to install to any other drive.
  4. Partition scheme: MBR or GPT.
  5. Target system: This option depends on the Partition scheme option, or BIOS or UEFI, or BIOS (or UEFI-CSM), or UEFI (non CMS).
  6. Volume label: The program will extract this information from the ISO file, which you can change if you want.
  7. File system: This option is very important, it decides bootability in UEFI or Legacy. To support Legacy, you need to select MBR instead of GPT.
  8. Click the START button to start creating.

If you get this error message, it means that the ISO file contains a file larger than 4GB. In this case, choose NTFS instead of FAT32, Rufus will create a second FAT32 partition to support UEFI boot.

 


This ISO image contains a file larger than 4GB, which is more than the maximum size allowed for a FAT or FAT32 file system.

 

In general, choose GPT if you only need UEFI support. Selecting MBR and FAT32 will support both UEFI and Legacy. Select NTFS if the program errors as above.

Download Rufus 3.6

Rufus, official site.

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