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IgorM

Gigabit network

3 minutes ago, Skiiwee29 said:

No. It will only be as fast as the slowest connection point, in this case, the 100 Mbps connection on the router. 

This would not be true. If both Client & Server are connected to the 1Gig switch once the switch has filled it's forwarding table with the MAC addresses of both it will bypass the router and switch directly between the two at 1Gbit.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I currently have all my devices connected to my modem/router that's only 10/100 capable but I want to access my server that is gigabit capable using an access point or other gigabit computers on my local network. Does simply installing a gigabit switch and using it to connect my devices should give me gigabit speeds between client and server despite having a fast ethernet router? 

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No. It will only be as fast as the slowest connection point, in this case, the 100 Mbps connection on the router. 


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Posted · Best Answer
3 minutes ago, Skiiwee29 said:

No. It will only be as fast as the slowest connection point, in this case, the 100 Mbps connection on the router. 

This would not be true. If both Client & Server are connected to the 1Gig switch once the switch has filled it's forwarding table with the MAC addresses of both it will bypass the router and switch directly between the two at 1Gbit.


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Only with devices that are connected to the 1gb switch will have 1gb connections.

So you hook your pc and server to the switch and the switch to the modem for internet / dhcp.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 7/22/2019 at 2:06 AM, Windows7ge said:

This would not be true. If both Client & Server are connected to the 1Gig switch once the switch has filled it's forwarding table with the MAC addresses of both it will bypass the router and switch directly between the two at 1Gbit.

That's what I've imagined but wasn't sure, since after both of them discovered the MAC addresses of each other via ARP, they would use it to communicate on the network and the switch would handle it. Thanks for your help!

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