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Queen Chrysallis

What is a Bad VRM Temp?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I have my own standards for GPU and CPU temps amongst other hardwares, but i got none for VRM...

I found out the panel on my motherboard displays that, its the MOS and i was told that it is the board's VRM... Its the only number that matches the one displaying in the panel

 

image.png.5990905466df6aba67335f6a19f3b8ef.png

 

So, when should i start to worry that my VRMs are getting a bit toasty?

In general i'm fine with anything under 80C, preferably under 70C for maximum peace of mind

But idk how VRM temps work so if you guys could enlighten me that'd be great

 

Thanks


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10 minutes ago, Queen Chrysallis said:

I have my own standards for GPU and CPU temps amongst other hardwares, but i got none for VRM...

I found out the panel on my motherboard displays that, its the MOS and i was told that it is the board's VRM... Its the only number that matches the one displaying in the panel

 

image.png.5990905466df6aba67335f6a19f3b8ef.png

 

So, when should i start to worry that my VRMs are getting a bit toasty?

In general i'm fine with anything under 80C, preferably under 70C for maximum peace of mind

But idk how VRM temps work so if you guys could enlighten me that'd be great

 

Thanks

70/80 is fine 80+ is getting toasty, but in general the board can handle it. And since you have a godlike board the vrm quality should be excellent also. I still wouldn't go above 100 though


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good vrms can handle 150c for 5000 hours. usually they are rated for 120c for 4000 hours.    <-- for continous load

 

try to keep below 100 for long term use. 

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18 minutes ago, Queen Chrysallis said:

So, when should i start to worry that my VRMs are getting a bit toasty?

In general i'm fine with anything under 80C, preferably under 70C for maximum peace of mind

But idk how VRM temps work so if you guys could enlighten me that'd be great

 

Thanks

The main components of VRM phases, the lo-side and hi-side mosfets (or the power stage, which contains these two mosfets and some extra smart stuff) are typically designed to work up to at least 125 degrees Celsius... a lot of them can last up to 150 degrees.

Motherboards will usually make an effort to keep the VRM below around 110 degrees Celsius, because over long periods of time (hundreds of hours) the printed circuit board under these chips can deteriorate if the temperature is above around 100 degrees celsius.

Basically, if the temperature inside the actual chip is around 110 degrees Celsius, the temperature of the printed circuit board below the chip is somewhere around 95-100 degrees.

The printed circuit board is made of lots of super thin fiber glass strands woven together in a pattern, then everything is impregnated in a resin/epoxy which makes the whole fiber weave flat and ready to receive the layer of copper. Above 100 degrees Celsius, over a long number of hours, that resin/epoxy/glue can have its chemical properties slowly change for the worst and eventually the circuit board can fail in that area.

Capacitors are also affected by high temperatures. Capacitors are those round things near the square things (the inductors). They're typically rated for a few thousand hours at a particular temperature (105c). What does that mean... basically it's something like this : if the capacitor is working in an ambient temperature of 105c, at the end of x hours, the capacitor's specifications will deteriorate by this much, usually 20-30%, and that's considered out of specification, broken.

A typical capacitor on motherboards will have around 2000h @ 105c for low end boards, up to 5000h at 105c for mid-range boards and up to 10-12k hours at 105c

The numbers seem low, but they're for 105c... if the working temperature is lower the lifetime rating increases significantly.

 

For example, if the mosfets are hovering at around 100 degrees Celsius, the capacitors will also warm up because heat from those chips flows through the circuit board, through the capacitors leads and warms the capacitor. As current flows through the capacitor, the capacitor also heats inside due to losses - no capacitor is perfect.  The capacitors won't be at 100 degrees Celsius... something closer to reality would be around 75 degrees Celsius.

So you can approximate how soon such capacitors would become bad with the formula 

 

Lifetime = Lifetime original x 10 (Trating - Tambient) / 20

 

So if capacitor originally is rated for 2000h @ 105c and it's working at 75c ... L = 2000 x 10(105-75)/20  = 2000 x 101.5 = ~ 2000 x 31.6 = 63200 h or 2600 days or 7 years of 24/7 use at that 75c ambient temperature.

 

Anyway... tldr ... I'd say anything under around 90c when gaming or using cpu hard is fine.  Depends on where the temperature sensor is actually placed... if it's 90c on the circuit board, it's perfect. If it's 90c inside the power stages it's even better, that means the circuit board is a bit cooler than that so it's fine.

Above that temperature, considering adding a fan to blow over the heatsink and increase the dissipation.

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