Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Fharbator

Enough watts to oc?

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

Hey, 

I wanted to oc both my cpu and gpu but am not sure if I should. 
My specs are:
MSI Pro VDH Plus

Ryzen 5 2600
AMD boxed cooler
16GB G Skill Ram

KFA2 GTX 1660 6GB

be quiet Pure Power 11 400W
Is the PSU enough to oc and if yes what voltage / clock speed should I target? 
Thanks in advance to all replies

Link to post
Share on other sites

is a decent quality psu but is very small, i would only overclock the cpu with that psu

 

these days one shoud buy 500 watts psus and the watts is not the only thing you should look at on a psu, amps on rails, connectors, temperatures when operating, airflow

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Fharbator said:

Hey, 

I wanted to oc both my cpu and gpu but am not sure if I should. 
My specs are:
MSI Pro VDH Plus

Ryzen 5 2600
AMD boxed cooler
16GB G Skill Ram

KFA2 GTX 1660 6GB

be quiet Pure Power 11 400W
Is the PSU enough to oc and if yes what voltage / clock speed should I target? 
Thanks in advance to all replies

I wouldn't try overclocking, That system probably pulls around 300-350 watts to begin with, so your already stressing your PSU pretty hard as far as I'm concerned. If you overclock the CPU and GPU you risk running really close to OC protection. That power supply seams to have a reputation for being pretty well built from a quick search, however I would recommend at most a small OC on the CPU, even so your CPU cooler may be your limitation anyways. I would upgrade that PSU to at minimum a 500w unit to overclock safely, however if your willing to gamble you can try slowly turning up the speeds, Use a watt meter connected to your cord to the PC if you have one it may be a good tool to monitor your PSU's power draw.

Link to post
Share on other sites

With the system at stock frequency settings, for both CPU and RAM, you are pulling about 200 ~ 250W from the wall.

Depending on how far you push the GTX 1660 and R5-2600, you could be hitting the 300 ~ 350W mark.

Given that your BeQuiet! 400W is rated for a maximum combined power output of 384W from the two +12v rails, you could be getting close.

You certainly shouldn't be exceeding it, but *may* have a small wattage headroom.


Intel X99 Rig -- CPU + PSU being RMA'ed
Intel Z390 Rig (*NEW* Primary)

  • i7-6800K @ 4.0 GHz --- i7-8086K
  • ASUS X99 Deluxe --- Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Master
  • 2x Sapphire NITRO R9-Fury in Crossfire / ASUS ROG Platinum Matrix R9-280X
  • 32 GB, 16 GB DDR4 G.Skill Trident Z Red/Black 3000 MHz + 16 GB DDR4 G.Skill Trident Z RGB 3000 MHz
  • CM Hyper 212 EVO (temporary) .... EKwb Predator kit .... in-progress
  • SanDisk 480 GB SSD + 1TB Crucial MX 500 SSD + 1TB Samsung 860 EVO
  • EVGA SuperNOVA 850W P2 + Red/White CableMod Cables
  • Phanteks Enthoo Luxe Tempered Glass Edition
  • Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum + Corsair K70 (Red LED, anodized black, Cheery MX Browns)

Intel Z97 Rig (Secondary)

  • Intel i5-4690K @ 4.6 GHz  4.8 GHz (still tweaking it)
  • ASUS ROG Maximus VII Hero Z97
  • Sapphire Vapor-X HD 7950 EVGA GTX 1070 SC Black Edition ACX 3.0
  • 20 GB (8GB X 2 + 4GB X 1) Corsair Vengeance DDR3 1600 MHz
  • Corsair A50 air cooler  NZXT X61
  • Kingston V300 120GB SSD [non-gimped version] + SanDisk Ultra II 240GB SSD + WD Caviar Black 1TB HDD
  • Antec New TruePower 550W EVGA G2 650W + White CableMod cables
  • Cooler Master HAF 912 White NZXT S340 Elite w/ white LED stips

AMD 990FX Rig (Decommissioned...for now)

  •  FX-8350 @ 4.8 / 4.9 GHz (given up on the 5.0 / 5.1 GHz attempt)
  • ASUS ROG Crosshair V Formula 990FX
  • 12 GB (4 GB X 3) G.Skill RipJawsX DDR3 @ 1866 MHz
  • Sapphire Vapor-X HD 7970 + Sapphire Dual-X HD 7970 in Crossfire  Sapphire NITRO R9-Fury in Crossfire *NONE*
  • Thermaltake Frio w/ Cooler Master JetFlo's in push-pull
  • Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SSD + Kingston V300 120GB SSD + WD Caviar Black 1TB HDD
  • Corsair TX850 (ver.1)
  • Cooler Master HAF 932
  • Logitech G9x + Corsair K70 (red LED, anodized black, cherry MX Brown)  *NONE*

 

<> Electrical Engineer , B.Eng <>

<> Electronics & Computer Engineering Technologist (Diploma + Advanced Diploma) <>

<> Electronics Engineering Technician for the Canadian Department of National Defence <>

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Fharbator said:

Hey, 

I wanted to oc both my cpu and gpu but am not sure if I should. 
My specs are:
MSI Pro VDH Plus

Ryzen 5 2600
AMD boxed cooler
16GB G Skill Ram

KFA2 GTX 1660 6GB

be quiet Pure Power 11 400W
Is the PSU enough to oc and if yes what voltage / clock speed should I target? 
Thanks in advance to all replies

Ideally you should figure out how much power your PC is using during a stress test.

 

Barring that, we'll just have to pretend TDP is power consumption. Given you have a 65W CPU, the 1660 is listed as a 120W card, add about 40W for the rest of the system (this is very conservative), we're at about 225W if everything is firing off. But we can make it 250W because why not.

 

Given that, I'd say you have plenty of power headroom for overclocking, but it may also depend on how good the board is for delivering the power (which I'm not sure of)

Link to post
Share on other sites

400W is more than plenty to OC the system. 

42 minutes ago, Mira Yurizaki said:

Given that, I'd say you have plenty of power headroom for overclocking, but it may also depend on how good the board is for delivering the power (which I'm not sure of)

Pro VDH plus has good enough VRMs to achieve a high OC on the 2600. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, JacobeeGames said:

If you overclock the CPU and GPU you risk running really close to OC protection. 

It's called OPP/OCP, and no OP wouldn't risk running it close to whatever the manufacturer decided to set the protections at because the 1660 and the 2600 are not very power hungry, they probably together consume somewhere around 250W max OC'd.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, hello_there_123 said:

It's called OPP/OCP, and no OP wouldn't risk running it close to whatever the manufacturer decided to set the protections at because the 1660 and the 2600 are not very power hungry, they probably together consume somewhere around 250W max OC'd.

1. It would be pretty easy to infer what I meant by that. 2. You also have to realize the TDP won't always be the max power draw of a CPU due to boosting and such. Not to mention some Ryzen chips may need some pretty serious voltage to overclock far. I would figure this system probably pulls around 300 watts under full load as is. So maybe another 100 watts left over to play with. For some people that's enough, however we also run unto efficiency curve issues and the fact that you'll be running the PSU near max usage which can cause it to degrade faster over time and eventually take a crap on the user prematurely, which we don't want to happen. That could cause premature death of other components too since when a PSU fails its usually pretty dramatically. Now in the end its up to the user, you can overclock however you know the risks of it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JacobeeGames said:

2. You also have to realize the TDP won't always be the max power draw of a CPU due to boosting and such. Not to mention some Ryzen chips may need some pretty serious voltage to overclock far. I would figure this system probably pulls around 300 watts under full load as is. So maybe another 100 watts left over to play with. For some people that's enough, however we also run unto efficiency curve issues and the fact that you'll be running the PSU near max usage which can cause it to degrade faster over time and eventually take a crap on the user prematurely, which we don't want to happen.

Last I checked, 300W isn't close to 400W. And the damn efficiency argument is brought up so many times and so wrong I'm tired of explaining why it's wrong and I'll just show a graph instead: aHR0cDovL21lZGlhLmJlc3RvZm1pY3JvLmNvbS9U

Also there is no evidence to suggest that running a PSU at max wattage is detrimental to its lifetime. Infact PSUs are generally built to withstand 20% or more higher power/current draw than its rated wattage/current, that's why the protections are set to the same.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Buy VPN

×