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Marcus Bridge

Dichlorotrifluoroethane (R123) cooling.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Ever since i saw the the fanless CPU cooler with it's boiling coolent, I have been wanting to develop an off-the-shelf design. R123 freon (Dichlorotrifluoroethane), with a boiling tempature 27.82 °C (82.08 °F), would be ideal for a pumpless liquid cooling solution I believe. As long as you avoid exothermic reactivity in certain materials you don't want in your cooling system anyway. Because it is a liquid at room temperature, it is safe to handle. It has been used in commercial cooling systems for many years.

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how do you even suggest getting ahold of that stuff?

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3 minutes ago, Marcus Bridge said:

Ever since i saw the the fanless CPU cooler with it's boiling coolent, I have been wanting to develop an off-the-shelf design. R123 freon (Dichlorotrifluoroethane), with a boiling tempature 27.82 °C (82.08 °F), would be ideal for a pumpless liquid cooling solution I believe. As long as you avoid exothermic reactivity in certain materials you don't want in your cooling system anyway. Because it is a liquid at room temperature, it is safe to handle. It has been used in commercial cooling systems for many years.

You'd have to find a way to cool it back down to the condensation temperature, otherwise you'll just "burn up" all of your coolant. At best you'll be left with the CPU side with nothing left, the system overheats, and shuts down. At worst, you have a bomb because the pressure built up from the coolant becoming a gas is too much.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
7 minutes ago, Mira Yurizaki said:

You'd have to find a way to cool it back down to the condensation temperature, otherwise you'll just "burn up" all of your coolant. At best you'll be left with the CPU side with nothing left, the system overheats, and shuts down. At worst, you have a bomb because the pressure built up from the coolant becoming a gas is too much.

Yes, a standard water cooling radiator. You would probably need fans. A pressure relief valve is standard safety.

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Marcus Bridge said:

Yes, a standard water cooling radiator. You would probably need fans.

And then you have the problem that it's only useful in environments well below the boiling point. There are people who run their computers in temperatures above that for better or worse.

 

EDIT: You'd also have to have the radiator well outside of the case, because temperatures inside and possibly just outside at the exhaust areas when the computer is doing something will be above the boiling point.

Edited by Mira Yurizaki
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Posted · Original PosterOP
8 minutes ago, CUDAcores89 said:

how do you even suggest getting ahold of that stuff?

Its widely available for air conditioning and HVAC systems.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, Mira Yurizaki said:

And then you have the problem that it's only useful in environments well below the boiling point. There are people who run their computers in temperatures above that for better or worse.

Your ambient temperature would have to be above your vapor temp of 27.82 °C (82.08 °F). That would be very uncomfortable work/play environment.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
7 minutes ago, Mira Yurizaki said:

And then you have the problem that it's only useful in environments well below the boiling point. There are people who run their computers in temperatures above that for better or worse.

 

EDIT: You'd also have to have the radiator well outside of the case, because temperatures inside and possibly just outside at the exhaust areas when the computer is doing something will be above the boiling point.

You could have on intake fans.

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3 minutes ago, Marcus Bridge said:

Your ambient temperature would have to be above your vapor temp of 27.82 °C (82.08 °F). That would be very uncomfortable work/play environment.

Not really. It routinely gets that warm in my room in the summer time. If I get too warm I just turn a fan on and the lowest setting works fine.

 

Just now, Marcus Bridge said:

You could have on intake fans.

The average temperature may be such that it's still too warm for the coolant to turn back into a liquid fast enough.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

That would be an issue for hot environments and would only be useful in climate controlled rooms... What i am proposing is not a low end solution and will have ambient considerations. 

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1 minute ago, Marcus Bridge said:

That would be an issue for hot environments and would only be useful in climate controlled rooms... What i am proposing is not a low end solution and will have ambient considerations. 

So how would this be cheaper and/or more cost-effective than simply using more efficient parts and high airflow fans?

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39 minutes ago, Marcus Bridge said:

Oh no it wouldn't be. The application would be extreme overclocking.

Wouldn't work for an extreme overclock. What you are suggesting is a variation of a phase change cooling system. Its already there. Not worth the effort sadly

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8 hours ago, Marcus Bridge said:

Yes, not reinventing the wheel. Just a suggestion to test the viability of R123 as a coolant.

The issue here is that you need a lot of semi specialised equipment. You would be basically building an Air conditioner in or connected to your PC. The idea would be to have the R123 expand as it passes through the "blocks" connected to your CPU. I have included a partial parts list of what I know you will need. There will be much more. Also there is a better/colder option. R12 would use basically the same setup and be colder. One major thing to keep in mind when using any AC style system is that condensation both liquid and frost will be a NIGHTMARE so a high CFM CDA system will be required. Like a wind tunnel.

1. pump and something to drive it

2. condenser and fan system

3. receiver drier

4. expansion block

5. Tubing

Having said all that. This would be a very expensive setup. A good auto grade ac compressor is $300.00+ if you are going to overclock test a lot of stuff then go for it. If not then it is not worth it.

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