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JustAnotherTechGuy99

PowerPoint Video Thoughts - Techquickie

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hello all,

 

I just saw the latest Techquickie video (at time of writing) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiYDWspiBr0) and honestly Colton raised some valid points. However, not all grounds were covered.  Personally when i went to Primary and High School and even a little in my first year at university i was taught the 'correct' way to make PowerPoint slides with the following which are but not limited to:

 

  • Only the most vital information to be used
  • Not too many slides
  • Easy to see colour scheme
  • Nice font size and font style
  • Limited use of animations
  • Paraphrase paragraphs if absolutely needed to most vital information

 

Now while Colton was focusing mainly on complaining about PowerPoint mainly with a hint of human error the software is perfectly fine. People are lazy, and they are the ones that make bad presentations. Example, one of my lecturers at my university usually has slides 166 slides long and he just reads off of them and usually does not finish the two hour lecture. I have also had lecturers not only colour code their slides, (background only) in such a way that it does not  make the font hard to read it actually made it easy to remember information and made the overall presentation less boring.

 

Once again it goes down to human error. If you can make wonderful presentations then you are awesome, if you make terrible presentations then please paraphrase for the love of God please paraphrase.

 

Thank you all for your time.

 

Sincerely,

 

JATG

 

Post Script, Anyone else had thoughts on the video? Also, Colton if you do read this it was a rant not a Techquickie video, or maybe a Techquickie video hijacked by a rant?

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i think its also important to know when a presentation makes sense and when it doesnt, just as much as you need to know every single detail without looking at the slides so you can talk with a good flow.

 

i hate when people create slides as training material and then hold a presentation showing slides and talking, this is the worst way to explain things especially if its a training for example for new IT tools or systems its always better to do live demos.

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6 hours ago, floofer said:

That’s my students problem thank you. All the answers to the questions are in the slides and readings.

I think you are about right.  Slides used in class serve two purposes. 

 

1.) For students to look at while in class.  

2.) For students to study if posted online. 

3.) To keep the lecture on pace and on track. 

When presenting slides in class I will sometimes read part of the slide... then talk about the subject matter the slide is about from memory.   If it is an example from the book publisher of course I read it. 

 

SLIDES in a presentation about something YOU WORKED ON... are different. 

5 hours ago, Pixel5 said:

i think its also important to know when a presentation makes sense and when it doesnt, just as much as you need to know every single detail without looking at the slides so you can talk with a good flow.

 

i hate when people create slides as training material and then hold a presentation showing slides and talking, this is the worst way to explain things especially if its a training for example for new IT tools or systems its always better to do live demos.

This exactly.  Slides used to train people need to be study matterial.  They have to ... speak for themselves.   Especially since most schools have them posted online.  Even scientific conferences do that....

https://absuploads.aps.org/presentation.cfm?pid=14777

 

The idea there is that these slides should be able to be read and understood without me...err whoever... there to talk about them.   Physicists and other academics use something called LaTeX basically a programming language to create such slides.   A past set of slides made by that person is used as a template on a cloud based website called Overleaf for creating American Physical Society "powerpoints". 

 

On the other hand.  Slides which are meant to be a more ... casual presentation.  Like a business proposal... or a Ted talk should be mostly images.  Then you talk about the images.   Here are two good examples. 

 

David Tong of the Royal Institution discussing Quantum Field Theory. 


Geena Roccero a trans model giving a Ted Talk about her life. 

 

 

Mainly images in both cases used to back up people talking.  The slides themselves are not going to be the subject of a quiz for grades or professional certification. 

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11 minutes ago, Uttamattamakin said:

I think you are about right.  Slides used in class serve two purposes. 

 

1.) For students to look at while in class.  

2.) For students to study if posted online. 

3.) To keep the lecture on pace and on track. 

When presenting slides in class I will sometimes read part of the slide... then talk about the subject matter the slide is about from memory.   If it is an example from the book publisher of course I read it. 

 

SLIDES in a presentation about something YOU WORKED ON... are different. 

Slides are kept short and concise for student to use their initiative to build upon and listen to the lecturer. More detail on a slide is not good. I'd expect 4-5 bullet points at most per slide, and around 30 slides for a 50 minute lecture. 

 

You should not study off slides, but off your notes. Bringing slides separately to lectures/classes whether on your laptop or printed out is essential. You should never copy off lecture slides in a lecture to take notes. When making your notes after the lecture , a combination of the slides / lecture notes and some diagrams of the text. 

 

Generally I'd expect students to know what is taught in lectures, that can be exclusive of what is on the slides for a full mark. It will be in the text, but will always be in the lecture. 

 

Powerpoints that are not lectures and are mainly images are slideshows.  

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17 hours ago, floofer said:

Slides are kept short and concise for student to use their initiative to build upon and listen to the lecturer. More detail on a slide is not good. I'd expect 4-5 bullet points at most per slide, and around 30 slides for a 50 minute lecture. 

 

You should not study off slides, but off your notes. Bringing slides separately to lectures/classes whether on your laptop or printed out is essential. You should never copy off lecture slides in a lecture to take notes. When making your notes after the lecture , a combination of the slides / lecture notes and some diagrams of the text. 

 

Generally I'd expect students to know what is taught in lectures, that can be exclusive of what is on the slides for a full mark. It will be in the text, but will always be in the lecture. 

 

Powerpoints that are not lectures and are mainly images are slideshows.  

Never the less students DO study off of slides.  Indeed I have many students who can't come to class and who will read the power points whenever and whereever they can.  (Not all students are 18-25 traditional age you know.) 

Ideally studetns would do the work outside of class.  They would live in the library.  Budget time and devote the proper time to study.  You and I both sound like we know they dont. 

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5 minutes ago, Uttamattamakin said:

Never the less students DO study off of slides.  Indeed I have many students who can't come to class and who will read the power points whenever and whereever they can.  (Not all students are 18-25 traditional age you know.) 

Ideally studetns would do the work outside of class.  They would live in the library.  Budget time and devote the proper time to study.  You and I both sound like we know they dont. 

The same content is in the texts, or they can watch the lecture recordings, get some notes off a friend - or the lecturer. Its pretty standard and achievable for 2 hours of study per day per paper. 

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19 hours ago, floofer said:

The same content is in the texts, or they can watch the lecture recordings, get some notes off a friend - or the lecturer. Its pretty standard and achievable for 2 hours of study per day per paper. 

Agreed.  In the introductory courses for Freshman and sophomores.... getting them to realize the time commitment college requries outside of class can be the hard part.  Tell'em they need to study two hours outside of class per week for every credit hour.  At least one out of a class of 30 will go to the dean and try to get me fired upon hearing the news.

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