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GabenJr

Microsoft Should be VERY Afraid of Linux Gaming

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Will 2019 be the year of the Linux desktop? After 2018’s rapid ascent, it’s shaping up to be one heck of a year for gamers looking to join Club Penguin.

 

 

Buy flash drives to test drive and install Linux from:
On Amazon: https://geni.us/GKLUwZ
On Newegg: https://lmg.gg/8KVhV

 

Check out Pop!_OS: https://lmg.gg/8KVhq
Check out Manjaro: https://lmg.gg/8KVhH
Check out the /r/linux_gaming subreddit: https://lmg.gg/8KVXc


Anthony @ LINUS MEDIA GROUP             

I'm a handsome man with a charming personality. - Gabe Newell

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linux has been a different beast for me, I tried it on a random system I put together. Haven't tried any gaming on it though.

 

Thanks for the enlightenment, Gabe Newell.



If my answer got you to your solution make sure to 'Mark Resolved!
( / . _ . / )

 

 

 

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I mist the most stable blending edge Q&A tested distro.

 

openSUSE tumbleweed has new software within 24 hours and is quality controled before it ships out. I have used it for a couple of years now, never had any issues. And as a bonus you can have nVidia drivers upgraded in the same way all software is upgraded. No need to download by hand and compile/install manually.

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Linux definitely looks cool, I'm excited about the possibilities. Out of curiosity, if I do switch over to Linux and find a game that I can run, is running a Windows 10 vm a viable option to game in? Or would just setting up a separate partition going to be an better idea?

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2 minutes ago, JollyGreenGiant said:

Linux definitely looks cool, I'm excited about the possibilities. Out of curiosity, if I do switch over to Linux and find a game that I can run, is running a Windows 10 vm a viable option to game in? Or would just setting up a separate partition going to be an better idea?

VMs take a performance hit, so it depends on if you can live with that or not.


So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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3 minutes ago, JollyGreenGiant said:

Linux definitely looks cool, I'm excited about the possibilities. Out of curiosity, if I do switch over to Linux and find a game that I can run, is running a Windows 10 vm a viable option to game in? Or would just setting up a separate partition going to be an better idea?

Partition or separate drive.  VM gaming has noticeable lag even with good hardware.

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5 minutes ago, JollyGreenGiant said:

Linux definitely looks cool, I'm excited about the possibilities. Out of curiosity, if I do switch over to Linux and find a game that I can run, is running a Windows 10 vm a viable option to game in? Or would just setting up a separate partition going to be an better idea?

Hardware support is hard to do in a VM. Mostly you only have a VGA+3D driver in your guest OS. If you want the full hardware support for the GPU (CPU is not a issue) you need to have a dedicated GPU for the guest OS and you need a GPU for the host. One can be the iGPU.

 

On CPU basis the CPU hit is minimal as you can assign CPU-cores and dedicated memory that are directly accessible by the guest OS.

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Xerohumoris said:

Hardware support is hard to do in a VM. Mostly you only have a VGA+3D driver in your guest OS. If you want the full hardware support for the GPU (CPU is not a issue) you need to have a dedicated GPU for the guest OS and you need a GPU for the host. One can be the iGPU.

 

On CPU basis the CPU hit is minimal as you can assign CPU-cores and dedicated memory that are directly accessible by the guest OS.

GPU passthrough is the thing, but it's a pain to setup (especially if you want to pass your GPU to the VM and back without rebooting / logging out and back in)
Edit: skipped through part of your comment, sorry. GPU passthrough works, but not without more effort than just dualbootinh

Edited by sobotkama
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It's a nice desktop OS... When it works.
Since hardware manufacturers for desktop computers give their products with windows preinstalled, it will be common to find unsupported configuration or drivers

Honestly makes sense, it's like hackintoshing a computer, do you seriously expect an unsupported configuration to just work? Even though in this case there are reverse engineered drivers, like nouveau (is just an example, but there are some broadcom reverse engineered drivers as well for wifi)
That just means you will not get full compatibility with your machine since your vendor do not support your OS, unless you are lucky EDIT:(lucky means getting community support like workarounds in the kernel, or the distro, etc... those are common for thinkpads for example)

Things really improved from the past as well, but there are still some issues with sound cards and ACPI

Even though you have some machines like the Dell XPS who are sold with linux, and honestly those are perfectly supported machines and work really great, you will surely have something like back light working here (the most common thing that breaks on unsupported linux laptops due to buggy ACPI)

But there are some configurations on desktops as well which will cause issues, like when new hardware is released, most of the time some distros like ubuntu use a too old kernel and would even refuse to boot because of the driver being too stupid about not knowing new hardware (Especially for NVIDIA gpu's, the open source driver sucks)

This is also an issue because of the small quantity of people using Linux, which obviously not everyone will report bugs.

What I'm trying to say is: Linux is great, but will not work on every machine due to obvious reasons, but it's worth trying especially considering how things are becoming better day per day.

I personally do not listen to people just saying "hey use linux, it's like windows but free and does the same things" because it's obviously not true, it's a different OS, never meant to replace windows, but with a constant improvement in compatibility, also speaking of native programs but also compatibility layers (which imo is the only thing that would make people switch, because obviously software companies will not support an OS with a little use base, unless they gain with those)

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Very cool video, especially Since I recently switched over to linux (95% of the time ;).

 

One thing I feel you could have done better: You should've started with the whole '85% of games are one-click installs on steam', then deep-dive into specifics like ppa's. Same with some specifics, for example it's irrelevant that the repository also manages dependencies, the viewers you're trying to convince don't know what dependencies are, nor do they care.

 

I do really appreciate the honesty about the downsides of linux though: that anticheat and drm is a problem, and not all software is automatically available..

 

All in all cool video, appreciate it guys! The future of linux keeps getting brighter :)

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Just now, RejZoR said:

They keep on saying that for the last 15 years...

It's different from saying GNU/Hurd will be ready soon, which project hasn't been touched consistently since almost 20 years, but 5 years ago you wouldn't even imagine about running DX11 on some Linux API, or even valve supporting Linux

Instead more and more companies are starting to support it, so it makes sense keep considering it.

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Could you please make a video on the best way to install multiple os on a pc? I remember you used a bare metal hypervisor for the 6 gamers on pc video. Are there other elegant options?

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So, we got a ultimate setup video. Then we got more of those.

Now Linux is inching closer and closer to a real usable platform for video games, and we got videos on those.

 

Logical next step, perhaps an ultimate Linux gaming setup? Things like eyefinity, non-daily peripherals (steering wheels etc.), maybe even your ultimate clean setup with the daisychained thunderbolt hub and eGPU? I'd love to see that.

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Don't see it, gamers aren't that big of a portion of Windows users; and most of them just buy grey-market keys anyway (though they still do get money with data selling & ads).

You still depend on Windows when using Wine; you're still running Windows apps.


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Just now, DrownLies said:

Could you please make a video on the best way to install multiple os on a pc? I remember you used a bare metal hypervisor for the 6 gamers on pc video. Are there other elegant options?

Install windows, leave a spare partition/drive. Then install Linux. 99,9% of the distros will not remove windows and install a bootloader. That is all you need.

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1 minute ago, Xerohumoris said:

Install windows, leave a spare partition/drive. Then install Linux. 99,9% of the distros will not remove windows and install a bootloader. That is all you need.

I figured as much. But i feel like there are more common questions when (partially) switching to linux. For example how do drivers work compared to windows. What are commonly used programs. Which disadvantages can be expected. How does the performance compare.

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Just now, DrownLies said:

I figured as much. But i feel like there are more common questions when (partially) switching to linux. For example how do drivers work compared to windows. What are commonly used programs. Which disadvantages can be expected. How does the performance compare.

If you're unsure about what to do and how it works, just try Manjaro from a USB stick! no commitments, but you can try out programs and other questions as you like

 

And yes, as XeroHumoris said, installing Linux SHOULD be no issues and just magically start dualbooting, but this can't be guaranteed. So especially if you're out of your depth or scared of failure, try it first on a computer with no hard drives you care about.

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I will say this as a hardcore Linux (Ubuntu 14.04 LTS til I die) user:

 

Linux is not ready to be a general purpose OS. It can do some things *very* well, but it does NOT do ALL things very well.

Ask any professional photographer about the state of camera tools/software under Linux, as one example...


So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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Posted (edited)

Another thing I would like to add from the one I already said are both good an bad ones.

One bad thing will surely be 144Hz support, not all desktop environments will correctly support it and even smooth 144Hz scrolling on browsers, and let's also talk about missing hardware acceleration by default. Surely, things that can be fixed in the future...
For now, GNOME 3.32 is the only one who decently supports 144Hz for windows, and also for games there are some performance issues like Xfce and Mate who do not disable the desktop effects by design.
And for multi-monitors there is no mixed refresh rate support and not even multiple v-sync on multiple monitors due to X.org technical limitation, and it's mandatory for NVIDIA because you can't use Wayland. But again, on wayland there are some performance issue as well with Xwayland games. A bit annoying.

Another bad thing is the echo-cancel microphone support, which has to be enabled with CLI because there is no GUI for adding pulse audio modules.
And I already spoke about broken driver support, not every config will be working flawlessly.

There are some common issues with ALC892 and 1220 realtek chipsets and AMD mobos with crackling microphone input who are not being solved currently.

Some good things though, is the native controller support for PS4 who do not need support and will correctly be detected plug&play seamlessly for example.

 

19 minutes ago, duncannah said:

Don't see it, gamers aren't that big of a portion of Windows users; and most of them just buy grey-market keys anyway (though they still do get money with data selling & ads).

You still depend on Windows when using Wine; you're still running Windows apps.

Is an open source implementation, so not basically really "windowsly" its a free alternative
There is even a Directx 9 driver native support on open source AMD drivers....called gallium 9, that means it's not relying on OpenGL and will have native windows performance

 

9 minutes ago, Radium_Angel said:

I will say this as a hardcore Linux (Ubuntu 14.04 LTS til I die) user:

 

Linux is not ready to be a general purpose OS. It can do some things *very* well, but it does NOT do ALL things very well.

Ask any professional photographer about the state of camera tools/software under Linux, as one example...

I know that by myself, but there are some good programs like Davinci Resolve I personally use, and Krita which are fine for me for what I'm doing
Also, KDEnlive, Olive are great alternatives at least for me.

Obviously are not if you rely on the adobe suite

Edited by Chunchunmaru_
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