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Wuush

Age of components

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hey all! Very new to the forums here (actually made this account for this post) and this is probably a question you get a lot. But i built my PC about 5 years ago.

 

My question in short is can the age of my CPU, graphics card ect effect the performance? I feel as thought lately my entire rig has been lagging. I used to be able to stream and watch youtube videos while playing games and now playing a youtube video while playing a low intensity game like League of Legends i get frame drop and freezes. I have very basic knowledge outside of general IT work (not so much with higher tech stuff)

 

If this isn't the right place to post let me know so i can fix it :D

 

 

 

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Depends on the component. For CPU, GPU and memory their potential performance doesnt change. If they run at this frequency and other numbers today, it will do the same a decade later. What can change though is the speed they are actually running, for example a cooler gunked up with dust and hair can give so little cooling to the CPU, that it thermal throttles (i.e. slows itself down) to avoid serious damage.

 

Then there;s the other parts. Storage drives do wear out over time and get slower and slower until the point that there are no more reserved sectors to replace bad sectors, that's when you start losing data. On SSDs, you also go through the speed loss process, but at the end it will just stop working completely and all the data is effectively gone. Not recoverable.

 

I think it's just dust build up or thermal paste dried to crisps and no longer conduct heat well causing overheating. Try clean the internals and replace the thermal paste (a tube cost around $5, use alcohol to wipe the old stuff off).


Studying abroad, ditched the crappy laptop for a do-all laptop double. Dried factory CPU paste, long memory timings, cooler cools the inductors but not the mosfets and an inch of unused internal space on both left and right

Model: HP Omen 17 17-an110ca CPU: i7-8750H (0.125V core & cache, 50mV system agent undervolt) GPU: GTX 1060 6GB Mobile (+100/+500, 1650MHz~1750MHz 0.78V~0.85V) RAM: +4GB DDR4-2666 19-19-19-43 2T Storage: 128GB Toshiba NVMe SSD (KBG30ZMV128G) + 1TB Seagate 7200RPM 2.5" HDD (ST1000LM049-2GH172) Monitor: 1080p 120Hz IPS G-sync

 

The best thing to do is reading the clock speed that doesnt end in a pair of zeros. Software voltage readings are wrong if your motherboard's not a high end model

CPU: i7-2600K 4493MHz (multiplier: 43x) 1.35V (software) --> 1.4V at the back of the socket Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Extreme4 (BCLK: 104.5MHz) CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 RAM: Adata XPG 2x8GB DDR3 (XMP: 10-11-11-30 2T 2133MHz, custom: 10-11-10-30 1T 2229MHz) GPU: Asus GTX 1070 Dual SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB (main boot drive), Transcend SSD370 128GB PSU: Seasonic X-660 80+ Gold Case: Antec P110 Silent, 5 intakes 1 exhaust Monitor: AOC G2460PF 1080p 144Hz (OC'd 150Hz) TN Keyboard: Logitech G610 Orion (Cherry MX Blue) with SteelSeries Apex M260 keycaps Mouse: BenQ Zowie FK1

 

Results: Cinebench R15 Single thread:159 Multi-thread: 787 (thx Meltdown Spectre patch) Super Pi (v1.5 from Techpowerup, PI value output) 16K: 0.11s 1M: 8.4s 32M: 7m 45.9s

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Posted · Original PosterOP
19 minutes ago, Jurrunio said:

Depends on the component. For CPU, GPU and memory their potential performance doesnt change. If they run at this frequency and other numbers today, it will do the same a decade later. What can change though is the speed they are actually running, for example a cooler gunked up with dust and hair can give so little cooling to the CPU, that it thermal throttles (i.e. slows itself down) to avoid serious damage.

 

Then there;s the other parts. Storage drives do wear out over time and get slower and slower until the point that there are no more reserved sectors to replace bad sectors, that's when you start losing data. On SSDs, you also go through the speed loss process, but at the end it will just stop working completely and all the data is effectively gone. Not recoverable.

 

I think it's just dust build up or thermal paste dried to crisps and no longer conduct heat well causing overheating. Try clean the internals and replace the thermal paste (a tube cost around $5, use alcohol to wipe the old stuff off).

Ok I will try that out tonight. About how long should thermal paste last though? I remember replacing mine now but it was about over a few months ago.

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5 minutes ago, Wuush said:

Ok I will try that out tonight. About how long should thermal paste last though? I remember replacing mine now but it was about over a few months ago.

 

Thermal paste should last 2~3 years when exposed to the elements; thermal paste should be still absolutely fine after just a few months.
That said, it is common for system builders to replace the thermal paste once a year (e.g. when performing regular maintenance on the PC...full dust cleanse).

 

My i5-4690K system is about...4 ~ 5 years old now?

It still runs nearly the same as it was new...


Intel X99 Rig -- CPU + PSU being RMA'ed
Intel Z390 Rig (*NEW* Primary)

  • i7-6800K @ 4.0 GHz --- i7-8086K
  • ASUS X99 Deluxe --- Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Master
  • 2x Sapphire NITRO R9-Fury in Crossfire / ASUS ROG Platinum Matrix R9-280X
  • 32 GB, 16 GB DDR4 G.Skill Trident Z Red/Black 3000 MHz + 16 GB DDR4 G.Skill Trident Z RGB 3000 MHz
  • CM Hyper 212 EVO (temporary) .... EKwb Predator kit .... in-progress
  • SanDisk 480 GB SSD + 1TB Crucial MX 500 SSD + 1TB Samsung 860 EVO
  • EVGA SuperNOVA 850W P2 + Red/White CableMod Cables
  • Phanteks Enthoo Luxe Tempered Glass Edition
  • Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum + Corsair K70 (Red LED, anodized black, Cheery MX Browns)

Intel Z97 Rig (Secondary)

  • Intel i5-4690K @ 4.6 GHz  4.8 GHz (still tweaking it)
  • ASUS ROG Maximus VII Hero Z97
  • Sapphire Vapor-X HD 7950 EVGA GTX 1070 SC Black Edition ACX 3.0
  • 20 GB (8GB X 2 + 4GB X 1) Corsair Vengeance DDR3 1600 MHz
  • Corsair A50 air cooler  NZXT X61
  • Kingston V300 120GB SSD [non-gimped version] + SanDisk Ultra II 240GB SSD + WD Caviar Black 1TB HDD
  • Antec New TruePower 550W EVGA G2 650W + White CableMod cables
  • Cooler Master HAF 912 White NZXT S340 Elite w/ white LED stips

AMD 990FX Rig (Decommissioned...for now)

  •  FX-8350 @ 4.8 / 4.9 GHz (given up on the 5.0 / 5.1 GHz attempt)
  • ASUS ROG Crosshair V Formula 990FX
  • 12 GB (4 GB X 3) G.Skill RipJawsX DDR3 @ 1866 MHz
  • Sapphire Vapor-X HD 7970 + Sapphire Dual-X HD 7970 in Crossfire  Sapphire NITRO R9-Fury in Crossfire *NONE*
  • Thermaltake Frio w/ Cooler Master JetFlo's in push-pull
  • Samsung 850 EVO 500GB SSD + Kingston V300 120GB SSD + WD Caviar Black 1TB HDD
  • Corsair TX850 (ver.1)
  • Cooler Master HAF 932
  • Logitech G9x + Corsair K70 (red LED, anodized black, cherry MX Brown)  *NONE*

 

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5 minutes ago, Wuush said:

Ok I will try that out tonight. About how long should thermal paste last though? I remember replacing mine now but it was about over a few months ago.

depends on the environment, paste used and cooler, usually they last from a year to three years.


Studying abroad, ditched the crappy laptop for a do-all laptop double. Dried factory CPU paste, long memory timings, cooler cools the inductors but not the mosfets and an inch of unused internal space on both left and right

Model: HP Omen 17 17-an110ca CPU: i7-8750H (0.125V core & cache, 50mV system agent undervolt) GPU: GTX 1060 6GB Mobile (+100/+500, 1650MHz~1750MHz 0.78V~0.85V) RAM: +4GB DDR4-2666 19-19-19-43 2T Storage: 128GB Toshiba NVMe SSD (KBG30ZMV128G) + 1TB Seagate 7200RPM 2.5" HDD (ST1000LM049-2GH172) Monitor: 1080p 120Hz IPS G-sync

 

The best thing to do is reading the clock speed that doesnt end in a pair of zeros. Software voltage readings are wrong if your motherboard's not a high end model

CPU: i7-2600K 4493MHz (multiplier: 43x) 1.35V (software) --> 1.4V at the back of the socket Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Extreme4 (BCLK: 104.5MHz) CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 RAM: Adata XPG 2x8GB DDR3 (XMP: 10-11-11-30 2T 2133MHz, custom: 10-11-10-30 1T 2229MHz) GPU: Asus GTX 1070 Dual SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB (main boot drive), Transcend SSD370 128GB PSU: Seasonic X-660 80+ Gold Case: Antec P110 Silent, 5 intakes 1 exhaust Monitor: AOC G2460PF 1080p 144Hz (OC'd 150Hz) TN Keyboard: Logitech G610 Orion (Cherry MX Blue) with SteelSeries Apex M260 keycaps Mouse: BenQ Zowie FK1

 

Results: Cinebench R15 Single thread:159 Multi-thread: 787 (thx Meltdown Spectre patch) Super Pi (v1.5 from Techpowerup, PI value output) 16K: 0.11s 1M: 8.4s 32M: 7m 45.9s

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, -rascal- said:

 

Thermal paste should last 2~3 years when exposed to the elements; thermal paste should be still absolutely fine after just a few months.
That said, it is common for system builders to replace the thermal paste once a year (e.g. when performing regular maintenance on the PC...full dust cleanse).

Ah ok. I don't have any Thermal on hand but i'm gonna do a full dedusting to see if that works first. I do know that the back exhaust fan has issues where is just doesn't spin sometimes as well so i wouldn't be surprised if the heat is an issue as well. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, Jurrunio said:

depends on the environment, paste used and cooler, usually they last from a year to three years.

Hmm well i only just replaced it about 6 months or so ago. I will dedust tonight and see if that helps. I do know that i'm gonna be upgrading my 970 card soon as well regardless

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There is some degradation happening but this usually only limits the maximum overclock and not stock speeds. For example, a young 4790k could be stable at 4.8GHz and 1.25V, a few years later it might need 1.35V and a few more years later it might not be stable at all at 4.8GHz anymore. This can happen. The closer you go at a specific silicon's limit the quicker it degrades. Stock speeds might get limited after decades - well after a CPU got obsolete. 

 

One of the reasons your system feels sluggish is the development of software and an aging system. Developers will just use the performance that is available. Why bother making it more efficient if there's plenty of performance available? And an aging system will become slower due to alterations of the system, corruption of registry entries, lost background processes and traces of programs you've long removed. It's not as bad as it was back in those WinXP days (one reinstall per year or so - or before every single LAN party) but it still is a thing.

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