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nicklmg

We got 10 GIGABIT Internet!!

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oh no

 

not again

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25 minutes ago, nicklmg said:

We got 10 GIGABIT Internet!!

Well guess what... I got 10 MEGABIT Internet!!


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1 minute ago, Geography said:

Well guess what... I got 10 MEGABIT Internet!!

Pfff. Loser. I got 2, a whole entire TWO megabit. Now try to wrap your head around that!


Gorishi Hive King

 

ゴリシ蜂の巣の王

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This connection can solve both the offsite backup problem and the slow speeds to offsite backup.

You probably have a spare storinator laying around @LinusTech so pop it in a rack at vanix.


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I reckon you guys should set up a failover or a backup instead of just upgrading it to 10 Gig.


"Mankind’s greatest mistake will be its inability to control the technology it has created."

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Glad you guys got it up.

 

Few points:

-Dark fiber is actually a term used to describe leased fiber, not unused fiber. Its called dark because you cant see the light on the fiber because its in used by the customer leasing it. 

-Using a LR (long range) SFP with a SR (short range) will not attenuate the light. Whats actually happening is its overheating one of the ends because its receiving too much light and burning the lazer.

- There is no such thing as a cheap SFP.... FS.com.... only overpriced SFPs

 

So all in all you are now part of the ISPs network. We deploy Ciena and that exact model and use it for layer 1 transport (yes its actually layer 1).  That 6500 they are using is common in transport and they are actually on a 10gig wavelength off a 100gig XFP on the main Ciena chassis. 

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Hi!

In France, we have a speed test site who actually supports 10 Gigs speed test.

https://www.nperf.com/

In this site, you can see the speed link of the server, so you sure you are connected to a real 10G server.

Sorry for my English...

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well, sheet.

 

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Latency is not Round trip time... latency is always one way and not back again.

Yes the ciena "CPE" will add latency, it's mostly a DWDM device without a optical spitter. This is like a switch with "extendes monitoring funktion".

Overhead is a thing, if you test with only 64bytes you will never get the full speed. This is why "more carrier grade" routers like the edgerouter infinity is telling the max. amount of packages at this small size. If you go to 1024-1514bytes you see "mostly the full performance" but you still have overhead, especially if your ISP is limiting your MTU zu 1492 in xDSL or sometimes even smaller on coax lines. Sometimes it's because your ISP packs your IP/Ethernet into SDH or put another header like PPPoE ontop.

IMG_1755.thumb.JPG.4ecdb29b8c28ddc5a55a0e75131de4f3.JPG

The max. speed you will see if you go higher like in a SAN where you use 9000bytes jumbo frames.

It's also possible to configure something larger than 9000 like 12394, so you can add ISP overhead without your customer get's any down sides. Like if you go with Jumbo frames (from customer) and transport it over a link where your command and routing like GRE, MPLS, IPSec adds more overhead, sometimes even combined.

In my sub AS I allow routing of "oversized packets" because my uplink AS accept this.

Then at the next hops:

- some of the IX (Internet Exchange) allow also jumbo, other not so if the connected ISP's can handel it, you have less overhead

- some of your direkt peerings, also allow them like on a link to another compete DC provider (tow customers even move around 30-60GBE to two other DC providers where they are also customers and for whatever reason they decide to go though the "internet" and not via a privat wave)

- even one of our four transit providers allow large packages

 

Testing with a browser is not very efficient, to much overhead like http, encryption, etc.

 

Peering at a IX or direkt is cheaper than transit. Transit is just someone is doing peering all over the world for you. This is why you have a 10G Wave to the DC and all connected peering partners (who have 10g or more) but "only" 5.xxxG to the "internet".

 

And then the layer 0 & 1, the distance on the SFP is only a slide tast, how good it could perform. The only real thing is the power budged, some 10km SFP's have a budget of 8,2db and the customer is using it on a 18,8km link...

IMG_0842.thumb.JPG.972f3518f27642e8db3ed676530b0855.JPG

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And meanwhile here I am watching this on my ISP's "premium" 10mbit connection 😩

I am assuming the practical advantages would be improved upload times and cloud storage access for backup jobs and file retrieval. Maybe a good test would be to see how long it takes to back up 150GB to Amazon S3 and pull down the same data, or how long it takes to download a 60GB title from Steam.

 

This would also benefit streaming and video hosting, so I'm not surprised FP played a major role in pulling the trigger.

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47 minutes ago, mynameisjuan said:

Glad you guys got it up.

 

Few points:

-Dark fiber is actually a term used to describe leased fiber, not unused fiber. Its called dark because you cant see the light on the fiber because its in used by the customer leasing it. 

-Using a LR (long range) SFP with a SR (short range) will not attenuate the light. Whats actually happening is its overheating one of the ends because its receiving too much light and burning the lazer.

- There is no such thing as a cheap SFP.... FS.com.... only overpriced SFPs

 

So all in all you are now part of the ISPs network. We deploy Ciena and that exact model and use it for layer 1 transport (yes its actually layer 1).  That 6500 they are using is common in transport and they are actually on a 10gig wavelength off a 100gig XFP on the main Ciena chassis. 

Yes I would also like to add some points...

 

"Attenuation" is what happens when the intensity of light decreases as it travels through an optical fiber due to glass not being 100% transmissive, and absorbing some light. It is not caused by short distances.

 

If you are using 10km SFP+ 1310nm which seems to be one of the common ones there is no risk of burning, the power isn't very high, I can't speak for 40km transceivers or >10gbit. Of course it will not work with the multimode transceiver because the wavelength is different, and it could damage the optic, but "short distance" between two identical transceivers was never a problem in my experience with them. They do run toasty though.

 

SFPs are really cheap (10km SM ones can be found for $10 on ebay) if your hardware does not require a certain brand. If it does, aside from flashing the SFP firmware to another manufacturer (which may be more expensive than just buying their own SFP), have fun with the cost. Even the bare fiber is not that expensive ($100-$200 a km?). The expensive bit is actually laying the fiber across buildings and the networking equipment on either end.

 

I am not speaking from a ISP perspective here, of course everything will be 100x the cost if you are an ISP or a customer of an ISP, because that is how businesses work.

 

Next, the speedtest servers are usually 10gbit if they go over 1000. The limitation is the speedtest client itself and your web browser (or even your CPU). The best way to test in a "real world scenario" this is definitely bittorrent, find a large swarm and try downloading a file. Or you can use wget with test files or any public https://iperf.fr/iperf-servers.php server. May be hard to find ones in canada though that have 10gbit, it is a lot more common in europe.

 

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Linus the intro would have been way better if you would have said

 

" we're going from 1Gb internet to 10,000 Mbps internet."


Can Anybody Link A Virtual Machine while I go download some RAM?

 

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"It takes this 10G wavelength and splits it into ten 1G wavelengths"... Nooooo, this is not how CWDM (or WDM in general) works.

I think Linus needs to do a techquickie on WDM and as an example PONs. Maybe he'll polish up his networking along the way xD

 

Also, don't think that you will be able to acquire a IPv4 /24 prefix, since they are pricey AF, but you should easily get a /48 or a /32 IPv6 range, register an ASN and peer directly in IPv6 via VAN-IX.

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37 minutes ago, PsychoXLR said:

"It takes this 10G wavelength and splits it into ten 1G wavelengths"... Nooooo, this is not how CWDM (or WDM in general) works.

I think Linus needs to do a techquickie on WDM and as an example PONs. Maybe he'll polish up his networking along the way xD

No he is correct. This isn't PON which works completely different. This is literally a 100gig spectrum and the module on the far end is assigned its wavelength range and handed off. I know because I work with both.

 

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On 3/15/2019 at 11:39 PM, mynameisjuan said:

No he is correct. This isn't PON which works completely different. This is literally a 100gig spectrum and the module on the far end is assigned its wavelength range and handed off. I know because I work with both.

 

Sure, PON is a bit different, but it also uses WDM, so it would be relateble to the topic.

But with CWDM, you should just have a MUX/DEMUX on both sides with colored 1Gbps trancievers. So you don't have a single 10Gbps wavelength, but ten wavelengths used for 1Gbps.

 

Also its a bit weird calling it a 10Gbps wavelengh since it's just spectrum and depends on what a tranceiver is capable of. You can fire both 1Gbps and 10Gbps on the  1310 or 1550 nm.  

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8 hours ago, PsychoXLR said:

Sure, PON is a bit different, but it also uses WDM, so it would be relateble to the topic.

But with CWDM, you should just have a MUX/DEMUX on both sides with colored 1Gbps trancievers. So you don't have a single 10Gbps wavelength, but ten wavelengths used for 1Gbps.

 

Also its a bit weird calling it a 10Gbps wavelengh since it's just spectrum and depends on what a tranceiver is capable of. You can fire both 1Gbps and 10Gbps on the  1310 or 1550 nm.  

It uses WDM in a different way. There are not the same at all. 

 

An no, these are 100gig XFPs that shoot from chassis to chassis where the hand off of 10gig is passed to Linus. These transceivers are not just 1310 or 1550, they are using all the spectrum in between. 

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14 hours ago, mynameisjuan said:

An no, these are 100gig XFPs that shoot from chassis to chassis where the hand off of 10gig is passed to Linus. These transceivers are not just 1310 or 1550, they are using all the spectrum in between. 

Thats the new service line. Don't know the exact devices so I'll just take your word for it 😃

 

But as for the old service Linus is talking about 2 min in the video. That's just a passive CWDM MUX/DEMUX right?

So there should be multiple 1Gbps links on separate wavelengths, no? Not a "10Gbps wavelenght that is split out into ten 1Gbps connections", right?

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16 hours ago, PsychoXLR said:

Thats the new service line. Don't know the exact devices so I'll just take your word for it 😃

 

But as for the old service Linus is talking about 2 min in the video. That's just a passive CWDM MUX/DEMUX right?

So there should be multiple 1Gbps links on separate wavelengths, no? Not a "10Gbps wavelenght that is split out into ten 1Gbps connections", right?

Nope, it still acts the same, just different gear. So his old gear acts more like PON with a single 10gig link spliced into 10 connections being fed a gig each and the downstream is broadcast everywhere but the upstream is still TDM in terms of taking turns talking.

 

This gear below is what changes it from a physical to a logical circuit. So now there can be full-duplex talking all the time as the two endpoints can negotiate what wavelength they can use. So this changes from passive to active. 

image.png.139a4a0a6d0d3cd84e727a61e1393fa3.png

 

 

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