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Mr. Cucumber

Concrete Load Capacity

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I live on the second story of a building which has 6.5" thick concrete (I couldn't get any other specs on the concrete) reinforced with 1/2 inch rebar. So I have a 1,154 lbs (GHB-1340A With CBS-1340A Stand) lathe and a 2,420 lbs (JTM-4VS Variable Speed Vertical Milling Machine 230/460V 3Ph) milling machine and various tools and parts (Mostly electronics parts some machining parts (tools, stock metal, hand tools, some power tools) and some lab glassware and some miscellaneous tools and stuff stored on desk drawers and overhead shelves) etc adding up to 750~800 lbs. Now can I store these on the second story? (I have one room as a work space) The room is 160 sqft.

 

Can I store the lathe and the milling machine? Because, I have no choice other than this. If this doesn't work I have to stop working and sell the lathe and the milling machine.

Thanks in advance ❤️ 

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Need more info, what's holding the slab up, walls, columns, brick block or concrete? How far apart are the walls below supporting that room? Is it a house or industrial/commercial building?

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 3/5/2019 at 3:52 AM, dev1234567890 said:

Need more info, what's holding the slab up, walls, columns, brick block or concrete? How far apart are the walls below supporting that room? Is it a house or industrial/commercial building?

Home, Held up by pillars and walls, Walls are 14 and 11.45 feet apart, Walls are made from bricks.  

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You need to get an architect or structural engineer to examine your situation to determine how much load you can (or cannot) place on that second story floor. There are far too many variables to consider for any lay person to make a determination. You know the size of the rebar used but how much of it in there? How is it arranged? What is the tensile and compressive strength of the concrete used? What is the age and condition of the concrete? What was the concrete mix (some mixes last longer than others)? What kinds of spans are involved. What foundation is used. What is supporting the floor itself? Where on the floor were you going to locate the machinery and how would the weight be distributed? Will the machinery ever be used (vibration issues)? There are factors I'm sure I missed. All that requires some seriously complex calculations and analysis only an architect or structural engineer can perform to determine the actual load beraring capacity, which will not be the same for every part of the floor.

 

Frankly, I seriously doubt a home would be constructed sturdily enough to support the loads you describing. Plus, how were you planning to get the machinery up there? Even piecemeal would be a chore, especially if there is no easy outside access for the second floor, which would rule out a forklift or crane. Whatever you do, other than consult the proper professional, do not take any advice from an internet forum on this.


Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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3 hours ago, Mr. Cucumber said:

Home, Held up by pillars and walls, Walls are 14 and 11.45 feet apart, Walls are made from bricks.  

Based on it being a home and having brick walls taking the load, its going to be a no. You would need at a minimum concrete reinforced columns holding up that slab and the slab would also need to be at minimum 200mm thick 32mpa concrete. The columns would also need there own pad footings/slab and piered down into load bearing ground.

 

Unless you have all the answers to the above for an engineer to look at you'll be wasting your time getting someone in to look at it. 

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