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Hiro Hamada

A Voltage Stabilizer Necessary or Not?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

So I have the TX750M 750W PSU and I also have an UPS (Numeric Brand) shown in the pic. So is there any problem if the power input is more than 250V? I mean should I install a branded voltage stabilizer to my rig or can I trust the PSU? 

 

8700K

H45 Cooler

8GB DDR4

GTX 1070Ti

NZXT Phantom 530

Seagate 1TB

MSI Z370 A Pro

 

So my overall power consumption would be around 450-500W so Im not worried about higher power draw from the PSU. What if there is higher voltage power like more than 250-300V input to the PSU? 

 

I have also grounded the entire build so is there any chance the extra Voltage could get dissipated into ground and leave the system?

 

There was once a higher voltage reading on my house's main electric junction meter. The PC was on but nothing happened. Now I'm just taking precautions

 

Please recommend me a good branded Voltage stabilizer/regulator

https___images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com_images_I_31vU7dLaPnL._AC_UL320_SR234,320_.jpg

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1 minute ago, Hiro Hamada said:

So is there any problem if the power input is more than 250V?

You'll have to look at your UPS's specs. Some of them do offer voltage-stabilization and surge-protection, some of them don't.


Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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Where do you live that you have voltages that high? Whether this will be a problem mostly depends on the RMS (root mean square) of the voltage. Normal 240V AC has peaks of up to 340V because of the nature of AC. RMS of 250V would probably be a minimal issue, but 300V is probably going to break things. This also assumes a mostly stable frequency of 50-60Hz.


¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

 

Desktop:

Intel Core i7-3820 | Corsair H100i | ASUS P9X79-LE | 16GB Patriot Viper 3 1866MHz DDR3 | MSI GTX 970 Gaming 4G | 2TB WD Blue M.2 SATA SSD | 2TB Hitachi Deskstar HDD | 1TB WD Black HDD | Corsair CX750M Fractal Design Define R5 Windows 10 Pro / Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon

 

Laptop:

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Most UPS devices have a feature called AVR - Automatic Voltage Regulation - used to smoothen the voltage spikes and decrease or increase the voltage to the preferred range.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
27 minutes ago, BobVonBob said:

Where do you live that you have voltages that high? Whether this will be a problem mostly depends on the RMS (root mean square) of the voltage. Normal 240V AC has peaks of up to 340V because of the nature of AC. RMS of 250V would probably be a minimal issue, but 300V is probably going to break things. This also assumes a mostly stable frequency of 50-60Hz.

I am from South East India and I had encountered more than 250V once as I noices my ceiling fan was so fast it started making scary noise I turned it off and noticed the refrigerator's stabilizer's display and it was displaying *HV* (High Voltage)and the fridge was off at that moment

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Posted · Original PosterOP
30 minutes ago, 191x7 said:

Most UPS devices have a feature called AVR - Automatic Voltage Regulation - used to smoothen the voltage spikes and decrease or increase the voltage to the preferred range.

Thanks for the info but what about above the preferred range? Will it able to regulate that?

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36 minutes ago, 191x7 said:

Most UPS devices have a feature called AVR - Automatic Voltage Regulation - used to smoothen the voltage spikes and decrease or increase the voltage to the preferred range.

only the more expensive UPSes will have the ability to do this. The cheap UPSes do not.

 

No idea if the UPS shown above has AVR or not.

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2 minutes ago, CUDAcores89 said:

only the more expensive UPSes will have the ability to do this. The cheap UPSes do not.

 

No idea if the UPS shown above has AVR or not.

I have one of the cheapest UPS-es on our market, CentraLion (C-Lion) Blazer Vista 800 and it has AVR, it's not an expensive tech to implement.

 

@Hiro Hamadasupposedly the series features "Super Boost Automatic Voltage Regulator".

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1 minute ago, 191x7 said:

I have one of the cheapest UPS-es on our market, CentraLion (C-Lion) Blazer Vista 800 and it has AVR, it's not an expensive tech to implement.

 

@Hiro Hamadasupposedly the series features "Super Boost Automatic Voltage Regulator".

Obviously you've never heard of the 40 USD walmart special "plug pack" UPSes before:

 

Image result for plug pack ups

 

These things are really only meant to back up a modem and router,  so they are built very simple. The do NOT have any kind of AVR. If line voltage goes above or below a certain level, the UPS will switch to battery.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, CUDAcores89 said:

Obviously you've never heard of the 40 USD walmart special "plug pack" UPSes before:

 

Image result for plug pack ups

 

These things are really only meant to back up a modem and router,  so they are built very simple. The do NOT have any kind of AVR. If line voltage goes above or below a certain level, the UPS will switch to battery.

Its not about the UPS it's about anything that could regulate the high voltage even a stabilizer but I'll use a stabilizer anyway so I could reduce any chances of damage

 

So the point is there is no standard stabilizer or an UPS from branded companies like Corsair, NZXT etc

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Posted · Original PosterOP
26 minutes ago, 191x7 said:

@Hiro Hamadasince your UPS already has AVR I don't see the need for an additional stabilizer. Are you sure you need such a redundancy?

Okay thanks. I'm just taking precautions that's all...I mean I saved money and built this pc with my own hands and you know how hard it is to forget the feeling that something might happen to my pc lol

 

Thanks anyway...I couldn't have built my pc without the help from this forum

I asked a lot of questions in my previous posts and I learnt a lot of things

 

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