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AlexTheGreatish

The ULTIMATE Powerhouse Sleeper PC

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Margaret, oh Margaret.  Potentially the build that caused the most stress ever, taking over a month to complete due to every step having loads of strange complications.  But in the end.. oh she's a beauty.

 

Buy a Seasonic Power Supply
On Amazon: http://geni.us/WkwJJt
On Newegg: http://geni.us/YiLV

 

CAD files for those that are interested: https://grabcad.com/library/margaret-the-sleeper-pc-1

 

 

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Complications? Custom? Stress?

 

All seems normal to me! Love the sleeper builds though, will have to check this out when I get home!

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10 minutes ago, AlexTheGreatish said:

Youtube, oh Youtube.  Potentially the premiere that caused the most stress ever, 360p over a ready video. But in the end.. it's a fail.

 

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5 minutes ago, Thermosman said:

Isn't this the second video stuck at 360p that they have had?

Wait a day, YouTube has to do some compressing thingie to it, all videos start at 360p and then the other resolutions can be used once YT has them ready. 


 If you wanna discuss the X58 platform and get tips and advice: General X58 Xeon/i7 discussion. If you want to discuss old Star Wars games like Battlefront II and KOTOR, check out my thread: Anyone still playing old Star Wars games? 

 

Long live his RGBness, @Damascus! And Fractal Design/SeaSonic dude, @Ordinarily_Greater is awesome as well! Also the man who introduced me to the glorious XCMR, @WhisperingKnickers.

 

X99 rig:

Spoiler

CPU: 5820K at 4.5-4.6Ghz, working on getting my OC 100% stable
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15S
Motherboard: EVGA Classified X99
Memory: 32GB (4x8GB) HyperX Predator 3200MHz DDR4
Storage: 120GB HyperX Savage SSD, 2x 2TB Seagate Barracuda 7200rpm HDDs
GPU: Radeon VII
Case: Corsair Air 540, Black
PSU: EVGA 1000W G3

X58 rig: 

Spoiler

CPU: X5670 at 4.56GHz/1.5v for now, planning to push higher on that voltage

CPU Cooler: Heatkiller IV CPU block and custom loop with 360mm slim rad
Motherboard: EVGA Classified 4-Way SLI X58 motherboard
Memory: 24GB HyperX Savage DDR3 (Red). Running ~1600MHz 10-10-10-28 for now, it'll to 9-9-9-24 but I'm planning to push to 2000MHz, thus the looser timings. 

Storage: ADATA SU800 128GB SSD, HyperX Savage 120GB SSD
GPU: MSI Gaming X 1080 Ti 11G 
Case: Mountain Mods mobo tray, PSU mount off etsy, some rad mounting hardware and a board of plywood and such from Lowes. 
PSU: Corsair RM1000i

Laptop:

Spoiler

Clevo P750TM1-G
Random Celeron, 8700K died so I gotta get my hands on an i5 8400

16GB 2400MHz DDR4

GTX 1070

250GB 960 Evo, 2TB Seagate Firecuda, 1TB Seagate Barracuda Pro

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Zando Bob said:

Wait a day, YouTube has to do some compressing thingie to it, all videos start at 360p and then the other resolutions can be used once YT has them ready. 

Since when was that a thing? I've heard of people unlisting their videos before publishing, but this caused them to get many less views. This has never been a problem on other videos afaik. Additionally, it def wasn't uploaded at 360p, so some type of processing has already occurred.


CPU: Ryzen 1700@3.9ghz; GPU: EVGA 560 Ti 1gb; RAM: 16gb 2x8 Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000; PCPP: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/b3xzzM

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2 minutes ago, Thermosman said:

Since when was that a thing? I've heard of people unlisting their videos before publishing, but this caused them to get many less views. This has never been a problem on other videos afaik. Additionally, it def wasn't uploaded at 360p, so some type of processing has already occurred.

I've uploaded videos at 1080p and it took an hour or two for 1080p to be available, when they're first uploaded you can only access 360p, then 480, then 720, and so on. This vid is 19 minutes long so it'll take a bit. 


 If you wanna discuss the X58 platform and get tips and advice: General X58 Xeon/i7 discussion. If you want to discuss old Star Wars games like Battlefront II and KOTOR, check out my thread: Anyone still playing old Star Wars games? 

 

Long live his RGBness, @Damascus! And Fractal Design/SeaSonic dude, @Ordinarily_Greater is awesome as well! Also the man who introduced me to the glorious XCMR, @WhisperingKnickers.

 

X99 rig:

Spoiler

CPU: 5820K at 4.5-4.6Ghz, working on getting my OC 100% stable
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15S
Motherboard: EVGA Classified X99
Memory: 32GB (4x8GB) HyperX Predator 3200MHz DDR4
Storage: 120GB HyperX Savage SSD, 2x 2TB Seagate Barracuda 7200rpm HDDs
GPU: Radeon VII
Case: Corsair Air 540, Black
PSU: EVGA 1000W G3

X58 rig: 

Spoiler

CPU: X5670 at 4.56GHz/1.5v for now, planning to push higher on that voltage

CPU Cooler: Heatkiller IV CPU block and custom loop with 360mm slim rad
Motherboard: EVGA Classified 4-Way SLI X58 motherboard
Memory: 24GB HyperX Savage DDR3 (Red). Running ~1600MHz 10-10-10-28 for now, it'll to 9-9-9-24 but I'm planning to push to 2000MHz, thus the looser timings. 

Storage: ADATA SU800 128GB SSD, HyperX Savage 120GB SSD
GPU: MSI Gaming X 1080 Ti 11G 
Case: Mountain Mods mobo tray, PSU mount off etsy, some rad mounting hardware and a board of plywood and such from Lowes. 
PSU: Corsair RM1000i

Laptop:

Spoiler

Clevo P750TM1-G
Random Celeron, 8700K died so I gotta get my hands on an i5 8400

16GB 2400MHz DDR4

GTX 1070

250GB 960 Evo, 2TB Seagate Firecuda, 1TB Seagate Barracuda Pro

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, AlexTheGreatish said:

Margaret, oh Margaret.  Potentially the build that caused the most stress ever, taking over a month to complete due to every step having loads of strange complications.  But in the end.. oh she's a beauty.

 

Buy a Seasonic Power Supply
On Amazon: http://geni.us/WkwJJt
On Newegg: http://geni.us/YiLV

 

CAD files for those that are interested: https://grabcad.com/library/margaret-the-sleeper-pc-1

 

 

Nice job.

 

Hope to see you guys modify that Chiller to go subzero when you build it into a case :D

 


CPU: Intel i7 3930k w/OC & EK Supremacy EVO Block | Motherboard: Asus P9x79 Pro  | RAM: G.Skill 4x4 1866 CL9 | PSU: Seasonic Platinum 1000w | VDU: Panasonic 42" Plasma |

GPU: Gigabyte 1080ti Gaming OC w/OC & Barrow Block | Sound: Asus Xonar D2X - Z5500 -FiiO X3K DAP/DAC - ATH-M50S | Case: Phantek Enthoo Primo White |

Storage: Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD + Samsung 850 Evo 256GB SSD | Cooling: XSPC D5 Photon 270 Res & Pump | 2x XSPC AX240 White Rads | NexXxos Monsta 80x240 Rad P/P |

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55 minutes ago, AlexTheGreatish said:

Margaret, oh Margaret.  Potentially the build that caused the most stress ever, taking over a month to complete due to every step having loads of strange complications.  But in the end.. oh she's a beauty.

 

Buy a Seasonic Power Supply
On Amazon: http://geni.us/WkwJJt
On Newegg: http://geni.us/YiLV

 

CAD files for those that are interested: https://grabcad.com/library/margaret-the-sleeper-pc-1

 

 

Also, you were using your router very wrong. While I cant see it very well due to 360p, It looks like you have severe chip welding in the aluminum, and I would advise aganist using double sided tape for workholding. Instead, I would drill holes and use screws to attach the part to the scrap board. When you are cutting a complete piece out, you can either put screws in it to hold it down once it is completely detached, or utilize tabs around the perimeter, a setting available in many CAM programs such as Fusion 360, which can be removed using a saw or angle grinder and filed down to remove the part. Also, remove the plastic protective sheet from the aluminum. Again, I can't tell much about the endmill from the video, but it looks like a ~1/2 inch 2 flute titanium nitride coated high speed steel endmill, which you are getting major chip welding from both on the endmill and on the edge of the slotting. Instead of this, i would go with a 1/4 inch or even an 1/8 inch carbide 1 or 2 flute endmill. To figure your your RPM and feedrate, commonly referred to as "feeds and speeds" there are many calculators online. You should reduce your depth of cut and take multiple passes, as slotting, the operation used here, is the hardest you can push any endmill, and you are going full depth in what appears to be 1/8th inch aluminum sheet. Rather than doing this, you should take several shallow passes which will take longer but will produce a much better cut than full depth slotting, which simply doesn't work in aluminum. The chip welding is caused by heat from friction between the tool and the material, as aluminum is a relatively gummy material. While a flood coolant system isn't practical in this case, an attached airblast system, ideally with an oil mister would greatly improve this.

There is much more information that you can find online about aluminum cutting on routers, there is absolutely no reason to just guess at it.

 


CPU: Ryzen 1700@3.9ghz; GPU: EVGA 560 Ti 1gb; RAM: 16gb 2x8 Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000; PCPP: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/b3xzzM

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1 hour ago, AlexTheGreatish said:

Margaret, oh Margaret.  Potentially the build that caused the most stress ever, taking over a month to complete due to every step having loads of strange complications.  But in the end.. oh she's a beauty.

 

Buy a Seasonic Power Supply
On Amazon: http://geni.us/WkwJJt
On Newegg: http://geni.us/YiLV

 

CAD files for those that are interested: https://grabcad.com/library/margaret-the-sleeper-pc-1

 

 

I think I know the perfect case for a sleeper with that water chiller.

The Compaq prolliant 3000/5500 had a version with wheels, that was enough for that chiller, and maybe that new Asus extreme mobo. 

6242009110254AM5227CompaqProliant_5500_Server.jpg

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Like I said in the comments on FP - maybe should've tried a fully rotary double 45 instead of a 90 fitting between CPU and GPU, it could give you the necessary angle to...well, not do what you had to do 😉


CPU: i7 6950X  |  Motherboard: Asus Rampage V ed. 10  |  RAM: 32 GB Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition 3200 MHz (CL14)  |  GPUs: 2x Asus GTX 1080ti SLI 

Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 1 TB M.2 NVME  |  PSU: In Win SIV 1065W 

Cooling: Custom LC 2 x 360mm EK Radiators | EK D5 Pump | EK 250 Reservoir | EK RVE10 Monoblock | EK GPU Blocks & Backplates | Alphacool Fittings & Connectors | Alphacool Glass Tubing

Case: In Win Tou 2.0  |  Display: Alienware AW3418DW  |  Sound: Woo Audio WA8 Eclipse + Focal Utopia Headphones

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1 minute ago, Thermosman said:

Also, you were using your router very wrong. While I cant see it very well due to 360p, It looks like you have severe chip welding in the aluminum, and I would advise aganist using double sided tape for workholding. Instead, I would drill holes and use screws to attach the part to the scrap board. When you are cutting a complete piece out, you can either put screws in it to hold it down once it is completely detached, or utilize tabs around the perimeter, a setting available in many CAM programs such as Fusion 360, which can be removed using a saw or angle grinder and filed down to remove the part. Also, remove the plastic protective sheet from the aluminum. Again, I can't tell much about the endmill from the video, but it looks like a ~1/2 inch 2 flute titanium nitride coated high speed steel endmill, which you are getting major chip welding from both on the endmill and on the edge of the slotting. Instead of this, i would go with a 1/4 inch or even an 1/8 inch carbide 1 or 2 flute endmill. To figure your your RPM and feedrate, commonly referred to as "feeds and speeds" there are many calculators online. You should reduce your depth of cut and take multiple passes, as slotting, the operation used here, is the hardest you can push any endmill, and you are going full depth in what appears to be 1/8th inch aluminum sheet. Rather than doing this, you should take several shallow passes which will take longer but will produce a much better cut than full depth slotting, which simply doesn't work in aluminum. The chip welding is caused by heat from friction between the tool and the material, as aluminum is a relatively gummy material. While a flood coolant system isn't practical in this case, an attached airblast system, ideally with an oil mister would greatly improve this.

There is much more information that you can find online about aluminum cutting on routers, there is absolutely no reason to just guess at it.

 

I agree with what @Thermosman says. You guys/ @AlexTheGreatish should really do more research into using more heavy duty equipment. These tools are not something that you can just wing and expect good results. I remember Alex asking about a welder and a metal lathe in an earlier video, and if you are to get those, I would STRONGLY recommend talking to a metal shop or someone with experience using heavy-duty equipment (even talking with a local school's metal shop teacher will be better than nothing). If you are to buy more heavy duty machines and not improve the way you handle them/ how much research you do beforehand, someone WILL get seriously hurt. I do not know the safety training that Linus Media has (you seem to be good about hand tools/machines), but there is a big difference between machines that you can hold, and machines that weigh 10 times as much as you. If you have any questions about "maker" related projects, feel free to DM me. I am ecstatic that you guys are doing more projects and really like the videos, it just makes me worry.

/rant

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Posted · Original PosterOP
49 minutes ago, Thermosman said:

Also, you were using your router very wrong. While I cant see it very well due to 360p, It looks like you have severe chip welding in the aluminum, and I would advise aganist using double sided tape for workholding. Instead, I would drill holes and use screws to attach the part to the scrap board. When you are cutting a complete piece out, you can either put screws in it to hold it down once it is completely detached, or utilize tabs around the perimeter, a setting available in many CAM programs such as Fusion 360, which can be removed using a saw or angle grinder and filed down to remove the part. Also, remove the plastic protective sheet from the aluminum. Again, I can't tell much about the endmill from the video, but it looks like a ~1/2 inch 2 flute titanium nitride coated high speed steel endmill, which you are getting major chip welding from both on the endmill and on the edge of the slotting. Instead of this, i would go with a 1/4 inch or even an 1/8 inch carbide 1 or 2 flute endmill. To figure your your RPM and feedrate, commonly referred to as "feeds and speeds" there are many calculators online. You should reduce your depth of cut and take multiple passes, as slotting, the operation used here, is the hardest you can push any endmill, and you are going full depth in what appears to be 1/8th inch aluminum sheet. Rather than doing this, you should take several shallow passes which will take longer but will produce a much better cut than full depth slotting, which simply doesn't work in aluminum. The chip welding is caused by heat from friction between the tool and the material, as aluminum is a relatively gummy material. While a flood coolant system isn't practical in this case, an attached airblast system, ideally with an oil mister would greatly improve this.

There is much more information that you can find online about aluminum cutting on routers, there is absolutely no reason to just guess at it.

 

Yeah the problem was just the different double sided tape gummed up the endmill and then the chips couldn't get removed. Screws didn't work because the aluminum was getting pulled up off the table while being cut.  Now have a single flute carbide cutter that does wonders along with a FogBuster.  Very aware of speeds/feeds, I did several classes on CAM in university and have a license for GWizard.

13 minutes ago, PhireFase said:

I agree with what @Thermosman says. You guys/ @AlexTheGreatish should really do more research into using more heavy duty equipment. These tools are not something that you can just wing and expect good results. I remember Alex asking about a welder and a metal lathe in an earlier video, and if you are to get those, I would STRONGLY recommend talking to a metal shop or someone with experience using heavy-duty equipment (even talking with a local school's metal shop teacher will be better than nothing). If you are to buy more heavy duty machines and not improve the way you handle them/ how much research you do beforehand, someone WILL get seriously hurt. I do not know the safety training that Linus Media has (you seem to be good about hand tools/machines), but there is a big difference between machines that you can hold, and machines that weigh 10 times as much as you. If you have any questions about "maker" related projects, feel free to DM me. I am ecstatic that you guys are doing more projects and really like the videos, it just makes me worry.

/rant

Believe it or not I've actually done several classes on machining already, this was just some growing pains and not having the right work holding on hand.  We are getting a lathe, but I have spent hundreds of hours on one already with an instructor in the room and don't plan on letting anyone else use it until they have taken a course on proper use.

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1 hour ago, Gargoyle said:

I think I know the perfect case for a sleeper with that water chiller.

The Compaq prolliant 3000/5500 had a version with wheels, that was enough for that chiller, and maybe that new Asus extreme mobo. 

6242009110254AM5227CompaqProliant_5500_Server.jpg

wow. where I worked back in 2000 had one of these beats. Was using it as a Lotus notes server. 

 

they were not fun to work in and if something died in it, like a RAID controller, the costs to replace were insanity.

 

would make for a cool sleeper though.


Quote

"Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so." - Douglas Adams

System: R7-1700, MSI B450i PLUS AC, Nvidia Geforce 1070. 16GB DDR4.

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LMG needs to do a collab with Uncle Bumblefuck AvE. He's also in BC, and a great guy. 

https://www.youtube.com/user/arduinoversusevil  I'm sure you've heard of him.

 

also:

 REEEEEEEEE WHAT IS A 2990X. THAT'S NOT A REAL SKU RESHOOT VIDEO. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
22 minutes ago, Mandrewoid said:

also:

 REEEEEEEEE WHAT IS A 2990X. THAT'S NOT A REAL SKU RESHOOT VIDEO. 

Ours is actually a pre-production model that says 2990X and I forgot about adding the W haha

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The point of a "sleeper" is to surprise others in a public setting, like at a drag strip, with a "sleeper" car that embarrasses Hellcats or Demons, or a LAN party. Building a "sleeper" for your house is just putting new guts in an old case, nothing "sleeper" about that.


So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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I love how at 10:18 someone was walking onto the set and nopes out.

3 hours ago, Thermosman said:

Also, you were using your router very wrong. While I cant see it very well due to 360p, It looks like you have severe chip welding in the aluminum, and I would advise aganist using double sided tape for workholding. Instead, I would drill holes and use screws to attach the part to the scrap board. When you are cutting a complete piece out, you can either put screws in it to hold it down once it is completely detached, or utilize tabs around the perimeter, a setting available in many CAM programs such as Fusion 360, which can be removed using a saw or angle grinder and filed down to remove the part. Also, remove the plastic protective sheet from the aluminum. Again, I can't tell much about the endmill from the video, but it looks like a ~1/2 inch 2 flute titanium nitride coated high speed steel endmill, which you are getting major chip welding from both on the endmill and on the edge of the slotting. Instead of this, i would go with a 1/4 inch or even an 1/8 inch carbide 1 or 2 flute endmill. To figure your your RPM and feedrate, commonly referred to as "feeds and speeds" there are many calculators online. You should reduce your depth of cut and take multiple passes, as slotting, the operation used here, is the hardest you can push any endmill, and you are going full depth in what appears to be 1/8th inch aluminum sheet. Rather than doing this, you should take several shallow passes which will take longer but will produce a much better cut than full depth slotting, which simply doesn't work in aluminum. The chip welding is caused by heat from friction between the tool and the material, as aluminum is a relatively gummy material. While a flood coolant system isn't practical in this case, an attached airblast system, ideally with an oil mister would greatly improve this.

There is much more information that you can find online about aluminum cutting on routers, there is absolutely no reason to just guess at it.

 

Thermosman, you seem quite knowledgeable about routers. Mind if I asked for a link to where I could find more information on them? I am on a robotics team and we have been having hell with getting our router right, it would be fantastic to get help. I know basically nothing about our router besides that it runs on a Raspberry Pi, and that its been having issues. Any pointers towards where I could learn some more would be appreciated.


Who needs fancy graphics and high resolutions when you can get a 60 FPS frame rate on iGPUs?

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5 hours after release and the video is still 360p, this is infuriating.


In search of the future, new tech, and exploring the universe! All under the cover of anonymity!

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1 minute ago, Wh0_Am_1 said:

5 hours after release and the video is still 360p, this is infuriating.

No, it's par for the course. Look at the tag line in the video

"LTT, We Don't Know Anything"

 


So rise up, all ye lost ones, as one, we'll claw the clouds

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Posted · Original PosterOP
3 minutes ago, DrDerp said:

I love how at 10:18 someone was walking onto the set and nopes out.

Thermosman, you seem quite knowledgeable about routers. Mind if I asked for a link to where I could find more information on them? I am on a robotics team and we have been having hell with getting our router right, it would be fantastic to get help. I know basically nothing about our router besides that it runs on a Raspberry Pi, and that its been having issues. Any pointers towards where I could learn some more would be appreciated.

I'd recommend NYC CNC , CNC Router Parts and CNC Cookbook for general CNC/CAM knowledge.

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