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Morgan MLGman

Come on Huawei... Huawei general sales director in Poland gets arrested under charges of spying for China

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1 hour ago, Morgan MLGman said:

Your thoughts on this?

This is starting to look like McCarthyism... what does Poland even have that is worth spying on (no offense)? Where is the evidence of said spying? How would the general sales director of Huawei get the opportunity of spying on Polish national secrets?

 

To be clear, I don't consider it beyond the Chinese government to spy other countries, possibly through their larger international export companies, but I also think this sort of allegations need to be backed up by more than words.

Quote

The men were arrested because the Internal Security Agency in Poland determined that they were in constant contact with Chinese Secret Service.

So... is this an admission that Poland was spying on them too? Or are we just supposed to take their word for it?


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Sauron'stm Product Scores:

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Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

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A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

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From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

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A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

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Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

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Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Sauron said:

This is starting to look like McCarthyism... what does Poland even have that is worth spying on (no offense)? Where is the evidence of said spying? How would the general sales director of Huawei get the opportunity of spying on Polish national secrets?

 

To be clear, I don't consider it beyond the Chinese government to spy other countries, possibly through their larger international export companies, but I also think this sort of allegations need to be backed up by more than words.

Unfortunately no more information is available at the time as the investigation is currently ongoing, it's a very fresh news even in Poland so I'll definitely update the thread with specifics.

I honestly have no idea why would they spy in this country, besides the fact that it became a huge market for chinese phones though so it might be related to that. Xiaomi and Huawei/Honor became the most popular phones in Poland over barely 3 years. Other than that, there's nothing here that other developed countries do not have. And it's DEFINITELY not military secrets because our military is a joke.

12 minutes ago, Sauron said:

So... is this an admission that Poland was spying on them too? Or are we just supposed to take their word for it?

Possibly, however I somewhat doubt it as it's three different people working in three different places (although in the same industry field) that were seemingly unrelated to each other.
My bet would be on someone reporting the issue after seeing some suspicious activity, however it's only speculation because no other information is available at this time.

I'll definitely update the thread if something new pops up.


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19 minutes ago, Arika S said:

so are they being charged with direct espionage (as in, they as individuals were the ones doing it)? or is it just because they work for Huawei?

两样多少?

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3 hours ago, Arika S said:

so are they being charged with direct espionage (as in, they as individuals were the ones doing it)? or is it just because they work for Huawei?

Why would they arrest 2 polish citizens along with them if it was just because they work for Huawei?

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Chinese companies boycotting Apple intensifies 


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9 minutes ago, Brooksie359 said:

Why would they arrest 2 polish citizens along with them if it was just because they work for Huawei?

Because that's how most spy rings work. You have a foreign national running an operation with developed agents in the foreign country.

 

As for the moves against Chinese Telecoms, a few years ago, the USA got a high-level intelligence agent to defect from China to the USA with a massive trove of data. What we've been seeing probably is the result of that. Beyond the Money/Influence that comes from the next infrastructure build out, there's clearly something more behind the scenes that everyone is reacting to and not saying anything about.

 

I'm starting to think an important set of crypto got broken about 2-3 years ago, but no one wants to admit it was compromised because they can keep spying on pretty much everything... oh jeez, did AES get broken?

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3 hours ago, Morgan MLGman said:

Well, I could argue with the bolded part as a Polish native, especially considering our current government, but yeah, I'm in the IT industry in Poland and I've heard from inside sources that it's quite a serious deal so I decided to post news about it :P

Ouch, really? They sounded pretty cool in things like boycotting the UE about food/product quality across different ue regions...


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7 minutes ago, Taf the Ghost said:

Because that's how most spy rings work. You have a foreign national running an operation with developed agents in the foreign country.

 

As for the moves against Chinese Telecoms, a few years ago, the USA got a high-level intelligence agent to defect from China to the USA with a massive trove of data. What we've been seeing probably is the result of that. Beyond the Money/Influence that comes from the next infrastructure build out, there's clearly something more behind the scenes that everyone is reacting to and not saying anything about.

 

I'm starting to think an important set of crypto got broken about 2-3 years ago, but no one wants to admit it was compromised because they can keep spying on pretty much everything... oh jeez, did AES get broken?

My point was that if they are being arrested along with 2 polish citizens then it isn't a simple matter of them working for Huawei. They must have something concrete on them if they wrested the other 2 as well. 

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8 minutes ago, Brooksie359 said:

My point was that if they are being arrested along with 2 polish citizens then it isn't a simple matter of them working for Huawei. They must have something concrete on them if they wrested the other 2 as well. 

Two technical points. 1) All Major Chinese Companies are parts of the Chinese Government. 2) Every Chinese National is, by Chinese policy, an intelligence agent and can be debriefed upon return to China. (This is why there really should be a ban on Chinese College students.)

 

I bring those up because most Western powers tend to run agents through Defense Contractors. China clearly has decided to run them through other types of companies, which brings their entire product stacks into question. 

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7 hours ago, Delicieuxz said:

 

snip

 

 

 

This thread will be treated like all the others.  The difference is your thread started of as a political rant about a tech company, the other threads became a political rant. If this becomes a political hodge podge it'll get closed too.


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If they are doing it in Poland, they have to be doing it everywhere right? Not to be mean to Poland, but its not a military, economic, or strategically powerful country. So if they are bothering to use Huawei as a front to commit espionage against Poland, it then can be almost taken on faith that every country where Huawei has inroads likely has Chinese agents at work.

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The big question on my mind is that whether this is done in relation to privacy concerns related to everything Huawei or is it related to some form of espionage that just happens to involve a Huawei guy? 


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Just now, RorzNZ said:

China will detain all of Poland.

Inb4 the Chinese do the slav dance


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Huawei hardware is known for spying and sending data back to China.

I don't know why anyone would buy a Huawei phone or device for that matter unless security is the last thing on your mind.

 

Lets hope the world ban's them for every Telco and Retail Store.


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And people defend them in the US, lol. It's almost like US intelligence committees have research and information they don't release to the public when deciding companies like this might be spying! Wow, shocking!!! 

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16 hours ago, Taf the Ghost said:

As for the moves against Chinese Telecoms, a few years ago, the USA got a high-level intelligence agent to defect from China to the USA with a massive trove of data. What we've been seeing probably is the result of that. Beyond the Money/Influence that comes from the next infrastructure build out, there's clearly something more behind the scenes that everyone is reacting to and not saying anything about.

 

I'm starting to think an important set of crypto got broken about 2-3 years ago, but no one wants to admit it was compromised because they can keep spying on pretty much everything... oh jeez, did AES get broken?

I would place my bet on IKE, the key exchange of IPsec. There were suggestions from various leaks that the NSA could break a large proportion of VPN connections and with IPsec being used frequently in an enterprise environment it could make it the exploited target.

 

In 2015 the Logjam attack was made public which would explain how the NSA could be decrypting VPNs on a large scale. It is based around the fact that part of the algorithm used to crack the Diffie-Hellman key exchange is based off a constant value which is the same for all implementations of the same key size so an adversary could precompute (and the NSA has a lot of money to spend on equipment) the part of the solution for this constant value and use it later to quickly crack a key exchange later.

Quote

“The parameters” (or group) are some big numbers that are used as base for the DH computations. They can be, and often are, fixed. The security of the final secret depends on the size of these parameters. This research deemed 512 and 768 bits to be weak, 1024 bits to be breakable by really powerful attackers like governments, and 2048 bits to be a safe size.

Quote

For the most common strength of Diffie-Hellman (1024 bits), the researchers estimated it would cost a few hundred million dollars to build a machine, based on special purpose hardware, that would be able to crack one Diffie-Hellman prime every year.

https://blog.cloudflare.com/logjam-the-latest-tls-vulnerability-explained/

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/10/19/nsa_crypto_breaking_theory/

 

There were counter arguments to the paper but even if it wasn't feasible then remember - the NSA have had 4 more years and can store any interesting traffic it wants for later decryption.

 

I would also argue that AES has not been broken - the NSA still recommend AES, although they did up the recommended key length for certain materials to 256-bits a while ago.

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9 hours ago, ScratchCat said:

I would place my bet on IKE, the key exchange of IPsec. There were suggestions from various leaks that the NSA could break a large proportion of VPN connections and with IPsec being used frequently in an enterprise environment it could make it the exploited target.

 

In 2015 the Logjam attack was made public which would explain how the NSA could be decrypting VPNs on a large scale. It is based around the fact that part of the algorithm used to crack the Diffie-Hellman key exchange is based off a constant value which is the same for all implementations of the same key size so an adversary could precompute (and the NSA has a lot of money to spend on equipment) the part of the solution for this constant value and use it later to quickly crack a key exchange later.

https://blog.cloudflare.com/logjam-the-latest-tls-vulnerability-explained/

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/10/19/nsa_crypto_breaking_theory/

 

There were counter arguments to the paper but even if it wasn't feasible then remember - the NSA have had 4 more years and can store any interesting traffic it wants for later decryption.

 

I would also argue that AES has not been broken - the NSA still recommend AES, although they did up the recommended key length for certain materials to 256-bits a while ago.

IKE or some part of the HTTPS system would make sense. Chinese backdoors at the Edge would let them scoop up all of the active data transmission for later decrypt. AES is probably crackable, for the NSA, in the "we really, really don't want to, but if it's the absolute last resort...". I just threw it out there because it's the only thing most might have heard about and it really would be extremely bad if it was broken.

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if you have proof they are spying why would you continue to let them sell products in the country? 


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