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raul2k

How to turn off thermal throttling.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hi guys, my graphics card (Gtx 1070ti MSI armor) when it gets above 65c it starts to decrease core mhz. I have an +220 mhz overclock and from 2100 mhz it gets down to 2050 at 65c and even lower at higher temps. i think it lowers the mhz to keep cooler, because i heard on from some guys graphics cards lowers frequency above 65c. How can i disable that ? 

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Increase Temp Limit.


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Then I would say its MSI trying to keep its card stable under a crap armor cooler.


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5 minutes ago, raul2k said:

Hi guys, my graphics card (Gtx 1070ti MSI armor) when it gets above 65c it starts to decrease core mhz. I have an +220 mhz overclock and from 2100 mhz it gets down to 2050 at 65c and even lower at higher temps. i think it lowers the mhz to keep cooler, because i heard on from some guys graphics cards lowers frequency above 65c. How can i disable that ? 

An increased temperature limit is not likely to help,

 

What you are describing is normal operation for Nvidia's GPU boost 3.0, the only way to maintain the higher clocks is to reduce temperature otherwise GPU boost will automatically down clock as temperatures go up.

 

Some options for helping this:

 

1: raise your fan speed

 

2: help a healthy supply of cool air reach the GPU to assist cooling

 

3: reapply thermal paste with higher quality paste, like conductonaut or noctua NT-H1

 

4: purchase a larger aftermarket cooler to help lower temperatures

 

5: purchase a liquid cooling kit from EKWB or others to provide maximum cooling potential.

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You sure it's not a power limit? Above 2GHz is a lot.


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5 minutes ago, fasauceome said:

You sure it's not a power limit? Above 2GHz is a lot.

This is correct, pascal cards usually hit 2 to 2.2 Ghz depending on silicon lottery so your clocks are good.

 

as i stated before, GPU clock speeds do not work the same way as CPU clock speeds.

 

a CPU will run at the speed to tell it to until it can no longer operate(crashes)

 

Nvidia GPU's use an underlying Clock speed adjuster that take into account 3 main things and it will adjust clock speeds on its own and it is NOT under your control: temperature, power draw and voltage

 

as temperature goes up, clock speeds will drop at specified points

as power draw goes up, the card will drop clock speed to remain within a maximum power draw ceiling

as voltages go up, heat goes up and eventually the card loses stability.

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to quote Anandtech:

 

To start, Pascal clockspeeds are much more temperature-dependent than on Maxwell 2 or Kepler. Kepler would drop a single bin at a specific temperature, and Maxwell 2 would sustain the same clockspeed throughout. However Pascal will drop its clockspeeds as the GPU warms up, regardless of whether it still has formal thermal and TDP headroom to spare. This happens by backing off both on the clockspeed at each individual voltage point, and backing off to lower voltage points altogether.

To quantify this effect, I ran LuxMark 3.1 continuously for several minutes, until the GPU temperature leveled out. As a compute test, LuxMark does not cause the GTX 1080 to hit its 83C temperature limit nor its 180W TDP limit, so it’s a good example of the temperature compensation effect.

TempComp_575px.png

What we find is that from the start of the run until the end, the GPU clockspeed drops from the maximum boost bin of 1898MHz to a sustained 1822MHz, a drop of 4%, or 6 clockspeed bins. These shifts happen relatively consistently up to 68C, after which they stop.

 

article is: HERE

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