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Condex

Which basic knowledge do I need to get my first junior JAVA job?

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Posted · Original PosterOP

I've been reading classified asking for j2EE experience 2/3 years

Spring, Hibernate,etc framework and other frameworks.

 

The idea is  that I want to build projects to acquire to practice on this DAY TO DAY skills. We dont have to re-invent the wheel there are many projects that share same ideas over and over again when work for a software factory.

 

I'm asking for detail projects that I can build to practice and aquire those skills. If I've not explained my self in the proper way please dont hesitate to ask me important info that I've could skept by omission.

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Alogrithms, data structures, and software engineering/industry related questions/skills like junit testing, design patterns and certain frameworks. Multithreading is on there sometimes too. At least that's what I heard from my classmates who like to brag about interning at microsft or Google but also share stories of their interviews. They said the technical interviews will involve you writting code on a balckboard. But i don't know for sure. I really ought to attend my schools job and intership fairs.... 


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I work in the tech field building backend systems for a large retailer. When our team looks for members, we look at different things:

 

Technical knowledge: you'll need to know your frameworks and basic sql. Youll need to know how to do the basic infra things like logging into servers, transferring files, setting up basic infra and platform. The reasoning here is that we need team members to help take off the work load off our over capacitied team members, and so if those team members need to show you how to scp a file over, or select the first 40 rows from a table, then its not alleviating any workload.

 

Problem solving: in large companies, there are many applications that are custom integrated between each other, in either batch or realtime fashion. Our team usually wants people who can think on their feet, and investigate / solve when issues arise, say due to a particular integration that is down. In the spirit of offloading work, its again not work offloaded if your bugging the existing team members everytime your dev site doesnt load or ends in 500. Other types of problem solving include things that can speedup future occurances of the same issue. For example if an app you built like crashed, and say there was quite a bit of research required to identify that it was your app that was the cause, then finding ways to troubleshoot such as writing logs or database entries would be a problem solving solution, so that say next time a similar thing occurred, it would be readily easy to proove or disproove whether or not it was due to the same thing previously.

 

My team hates those team members that are hell bent on a particular solution and wont budge. We also dont favor those who just "sell" on using something, but never tried it themselves, only to find out it doesnt work well after many hours later of testing. But since we're in retail and not say in r&d areas, that's prob why we're favored more on proven results than experimental stuff.

 

Of course the type of position (intern, junior, senior) would have different expectations of competency.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 12/2/2018 at 10:54 PM, JonathanK said:

I work in the tech field building backend systems for a large retailer. When our team looks for members, we look at different things:

 

Technical knowledge: you'll need to know your frameworks and basic sql. Youll need to know how to do the basic infra things like logging into servers, transferring files, setting up basic infra and platform. The reasoning here is that we need team members to help take off the work load off our over capacitied team members, and so if those team members need to show you how to scp a file over, or select the first 40 rows from a table, then its not alleviating any workload.

 

Problem solving: in large companies, there are many applications that are custom integrated between each other, in either batch or realtime fashion. Our team usually wants people who can think on their feet, and investigate / solve when issues arise, say due to a particular integration that is down. In the spirit of offloading work, its again not work offloaded if your bugging the existing team members everytime your dev site doesnt load or ends in 500. Other types of problem solving include things that can speedup future occurances of the same issue. For example if an app you built like crashed, and say there was quite a bit of research required to identify that it was your app that was the cause, then finding ways to troubleshoot such as writing logs or database entries would be a problem solving solution, so that say next time a similar thing occurred, it would be readily easy to proove or disproove whether or not it was due to the same thing previously.

 

My team hates those team members that are hell bent on a particular solution and wont budge. We also dont favor those who just "sell" on using something, but never tried it themselves, only to find out it doesnt work well after many hours later of testing. But since we're in retail and not say in r&d areas, that's prob why we're favored more on proven results than experimental stuff.

 

Of course the type of position (intern, junior, senior) would have different expectations of competency.

I'm aware a bit of the soft-skills needed for the job, but it's really useful to count with such a good brief description of the different situation that you described for them.

 

What I was looking to develop now which I think its crucial, are technical skills through "job request examples" like a classic daily day in a java job where your manager comes to the group exposing the new project in detailed so the tasks are split between each part of the team. So I can aquire the JAVA skills through practicing with a REAL WORLD EXPERIENCE. I'm looking for a site/place where I can check that information, take examples, so when I'm done with them I can add them to my portfolio which will be great at the interview moment to show what I'm capable of.

 

On 12/2/2018 at 10:32 PM, wasab said:

Alogrithms, data structures, and software engineering/industry related questions/skills like junit testing, design patterns and certain frameworks. Multithreading is on there sometimes too. At least that's what I heard from my classmates who like to brag about interning at microsft or Google but also share stories of their interviews. They said the technical interviews will involve you writting code on a balckboard. But i don't know for sure. I really ought to attend my schools job and intership fairs.... 

Regards those seems to be the technical skills that I would be needing to develop on this journey. The way that big companies like google and microsoft do things most of the times are different to lesser and smaller companies.

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I'm going to be real with you, job posting requirements are complete bullshit in the sense that you can ignore a lot of it. You know the entry level positions that want years of experience? Yeah, they're just automatically filled that way. Meeting 50% of the requirements is usually good enough. Not exactly an answer to your question but I wanted to let you know that you don't need to be perfect, just a better fit than others.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
12 minutes ago, 2FA said:

I'm going to be real with you, job posting requirements are complete bullshit in the sense that you can ignore a lot of it. You know the entry level positions that want years of experience? Yeah, they're just automatically filled that way. Meeting 50% of the requirements is usually good enough. Not exactly an answer to your question but I wanted to let you know that you don't need to be perfect, just a better fit than others.

I'm agree with u, u right abot 50% is more than enough but I need the 50% first to get there :)

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On 12/2/2018 at 11:42 AM, Condex said:

I've been reading classified asking for j2EE experience 2/3 years

Spring, Hibernate,etc framework and other frameworks.

 

The idea is  that I want to build projects to acquire to practice on this DAY TO DAY skills. We dont have to re-invent the wheel there are many projects that share same ideas over and over again when work for a software factory.

 

I'm asking for detail projects that I can build to practice and aquire those skills. If I've not explained my self in the proper way please dont hesitate to ask me important info that I've could skept by omission.

The longer I've been working, the more I think how less important it is to know how to code (I mean, it's still important) than it is to say know the following:

  • How to identify what's actually needed
  • How to write good, testable requirements
  • How to write good documentation, including design docs and test plans
  • How to understand the system and read someone else's code
  • How to come up with good designs
  • How to make someone else's, including yours, life easier (I spent a non-trivial amount of time writing scripts and tools to make someone's life easier)

Some of these are harder if you're just doing stuff on your own and you have no interest in learning some other random project on say GitHub or something. But I've come to the conclusion that realistically speaking, actual coding accounts for a lot less time than the rest of the software development process.

 

There's also other key elements when working at a company:

  • How effective are you at communication?
    • This is not only clearly explaining what you're doing to your colleagues, but being able to adjust the level of detail and technicality based on your audience. Talking about algorithms data types to the PM will just fly over their head.
  • How well do you work with others?
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1 hour ago, Condex said:

Still looking for more suggestions, I'll appreciate it, regards

The offering you mentioned said 2/3 years experience, which says to me that it might not be that entry level. That sounds like it's targeting someone who isn't fresh out of school, but also isn't ready for senior engineer status. 

 

For actual entry level positions (ones that will hire out of school), specific techs are likely only going to be a bonus, not a requirement. What's far more important are things like:

 

OOP fundamentals

Data structures

Basic code knowledge (e.g. fizzbuzz)

 

For example, you might get asked these questions in an interview:
"Design a Thermometer class. What fields/methods might it have?"
"Now let's say I want use that thermometer class to monitor for if the temperature leaves a certain threshold, what would a method like that look like?"

(this is very close to an actual question I was asked in an interview. I modified it a bit because the original was actually really dumb, since it was trying to be too flashy and ended up just confusing both me and the interviewer lol)

 

Other examples might use things like inheritance/polymorphism, so be comfortable with those as well.
 


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