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FunKaLiTy

Optimal cooling of SSD without degrading it's lifespan

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Posted (edited) · Original PosterOP

So I just learned that SSD's actually prefer writing on higher temperatures so built-in heatsinks for the m.2 slot(s) on your motherboard may actually be detrimental to your SSD and can reduce it's lifespan by as much as 50%!

 

However it may be beneficial to cool specifically the controller part of your SSD so it is recommended you trim down the thermal pad on your heatsink so it only covers the controller part of your m.2 SSD card.

 

So what I wanna ask is how do i recognize the controller part of an m.2 SSD?

Specifically I'm interested in knowing what part of this SSD is the controller:
https://www.wd.com/products/internal-ssd/wd-black-nvme-ssd.html#WDS500G2X0C

 

But would be good to learn in general how to recognize the controller part of an SSD, not just for me, but also for anyone else who might read this thread.


 

Source of my newfound knowledge: 

 

Edited by FunKaLiTy
Added link to video explaining the m.2 heatsink issue
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3 minutes ago, FunKaLiTy said:

So I just learned that SSD's actually prefer writing on higher temperatures so built-in heatsinks for the m.2 slot(s) on your motherboard may actually be detrimental to your SSD and can reduce it's lifespan by as much as 50%!

Firstly, where's the proof?


Our Grace. The Feathered One. He shows us the way. His bob is majestic and shows us the path. Follow unto his guidance and His example. He knows the one true path. Our Saviour. Our Grace. Our Father Birb has taught us with His humble heart and gentle wing the way of the bob. Let us show Him our reverence and follow in His example. The True Path of the Feathered One. ~ Dimboble-dubabob III

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The flash memory chips are usually the chips that have all the same shape and they're typically more square-ish and thicker (because they stack lots - 32, 48, 64, 96 layers of silicon dies).

 

The processor (ssd controller) is typically the chip closest to the sata or m.2 connector, because it makes sense - that's a high speed connection and you don't want those tiny traces to pick up interference from your pc as if they're radio antennas. However, that's not a rule. If the SSD has flash memory chips on both sides, the ssd controller may be placed in the center because this way they can make traces go on both sides of the chip AND go through the circuit board to the other side. 

 

Note that some ssd controllers have a DDR3 or DDR4 memory chip right by them (used for caching data and keeping track of where stuff goes in the flash memory chips) and sometimes this memory is stacked on top of the actual ssd controller or doesn't exist.

 

Anyway... in your particular case, I would first of all try to get some infrared temperature measurement tool ( like this Uni-t UT301A I own , or anything similar to this really )  or maybe get a digital multimeter with temperature measurement and a K-type probe to put on the actual chip surface.

 

Basically, measure the chips and see if the temperature is actually a concern.

 

I suspect the SSD controller will run at around 40-60 degrees celsius as long as you're not constantly writing to the flash memory chips (not doing long high speed file copies). When you're actually doing heavy stuff, it may go up to 70-80 degrees - the controller simply isn't that powerful and doesn't use so much power as to generate so much that it would need heatsinks, when under heavy load it can cool itself by radiating heat through the circuit board.

 

 

 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

@mariushm Thanks for your reply, you seem to know a lot about this, just the type of guy I wanted to reach asking this question here! :)

 

So is it the specific controller on my SSD you believe wont heat up or controllers in general on consumer SSDs?

I'm asking because this SSD has one of the fastest read/write speeds I could find so if that doesn't qualify for it needing a heatsink, but most new motherboards come with a heatsink, then what does? ^^

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