Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Trixanity

Member
  • Content Count

    3,330
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from Results45 in Next Generation AMD Mobility 7nm CPUs Landing In Q1 2020, Will Bring AMD Gaming Laptops Price Down To $699   
    The 13" Razer Stealth has a GTX 1650 option. So I guess you could call that statement false. It's probably throttling like hell but still: there are lots of laptops with dedicated graphics in thin form factors. You'll just have to accept the hefty price tag and the overheating causing throttling.
  2. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from Beef Boss in RGB is a massive security backdoor   
    Just read some new info: apparently you don't even need admin access. Any user has access on the basis that any user should be able to change the RGB lighting hence having read/write access.
    There's a lot more info but basically instead of the driver acting as a middle man to any requests from the software (and therefore acting as a gatekeeper) it just indiscriminately allows direct access to the hardware like some kind of pass-through. The bus it uses to communicate is shared so any other hardware on that bus would be compromised as well and could (if nothing else) be used to brick your stuff. Also, the NIC is supposedly on the same bus so you could use it while circumventing the OS to send packets to and from your device without you knowing it.
  3. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from MoonSpot in Intel Concedes HEDT, Practically slashes pricing in half with Cascade Lake X   
    Competition is a beautiful thing.
    That's a lot of profit being lifted straight out of Intel's pockets. Goes to show how crazy good the margins Intel must have had over the last decade.
  4. Agree
    Trixanity reacted to Arika S in Bricks Had Been S**t: LEGO issues takedowns of custom-LEGO objects on Thingiverse and MyMiniFactory, incl those that don't exist in the LEGO partlist   
    Because if they are being advertised as LEGO pieces, that's where you start to fall into the trademark rabbit hole, a Trademark needs to be very carefully handled.
    Because it's written so well, here it is from an official announcement from TLG from a similar situation a while ago
     
    A trademark must be able to distinguish the goods of one company from those of another. If a trademark loses this ability, the owner may find that it can no longer prevent others from using the trademark. An owner must prevent the improper use of its trademarks to prevent the public from being deceived. This is why the LEGO Group is very active around the world in making sure that its trademarks are not misused.
     
    If they don't enforce their rights, they could easily lose their ability to prevent anyone from using the name "LEGO" when referring to any similar plastic bricks. they are essentially avoiding the name "LEGO" from becoming a genericized trademark or proprietary eponym.
     
    If they were directly being listed as LEGO bricks/pieces then TLG wouldn't be able to do much, making something compatible with an existing product is not against trademark rules, but marking it specifically with "LEGO" does mean they have to protect their trademark or risk losing it.
     
    To be clear, they are not against people 3d printing things for themselves, besides the fact they cannot actually stop people, it's the sharing it online that they don't approve of.
  5. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from Bananasplit_00 in RGB is a massive security backdoor   
    A guy just discovered that all the RGB controls on motherboards are designed so poorly that people can use it as a backdoor into the motherboard.
    It sounds like it's possible to upload various pieces of software through whatever interface/API the RGB control uses. The RGB software has even been discovered to be quite buggy resulting in the software causing bootloops and therefore resetting CMOS to get out of the loop. So that you can mess with the RGB in that fashion can lead to a host of problems and possible attacks.
     
    Read more in the Twitter thread.
     
    Source: https://twitter.com/gsuberland/status/1175570500292108289
  6. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from Tech_Dreamer in RGB is a massive security backdoor   
    A guy just discovered that all the RGB controls on motherboards are designed so poorly that people can use it as a backdoor into the motherboard.
    It sounds like it's possible to upload various pieces of software through whatever interface/API the RGB control uses. The RGB software has even been discovered to be quite buggy resulting in the software causing bootloops and therefore resetting CMOS to get out of the loop. So that you can mess with the RGB in that fashion can lead to a host of problems and possible attacks.
     
    Read more in the Twitter thread.
     
    Source: https://twitter.com/gsuberland/status/1175570500292108289
  7. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from Pascal... in RGB is a massive security backdoor   
    A guy just discovered that all the RGB controls on motherboards are designed so poorly that people can use it as a backdoor into the motherboard.
    It sounds like it's possible to upload various pieces of software through whatever interface/API the RGB control uses. The RGB software has even been discovered to be quite buggy resulting in the software causing bootloops and therefore resetting CMOS to get out of the loop. So that you can mess with the RGB in that fashion can lead to a host of problems and possible attacks.
     
    Read more in the Twitter thread.
     
    Source: https://twitter.com/gsuberland/status/1175570500292108289
  8. Informative
    Trixanity got a reaction from MimigaKing in RGB is a massive security backdoor   
    A guy just discovered that all the RGB controls on motherboards are designed so poorly that people can use it as a backdoor into the motherboard.
    It sounds like it's possible to upload various pieces of software through whatever interface/API the RGB control uses. The RGB software has even been discovered to be quite buggy resulting in the software causing bootloops and therefore resetting CMOS to get out of the loop. So that you can mess with the RGB in that fashion can lead to a host of problems and possible attacks.
     
    Read more in the Twitter thread.
     
    Source: https://twitter.com/gsuberland/status/1175570500292108289
  9. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from Taf the Ghost in RGB is a massive security backdoor   
    A guy just discovered that all the RGB controls on motherboards are designed so poorly that people can use it as a backdoor into the motherboard.
    It sounds like it's possible to upload various pieces of software through whatever interface/API the RGB control uses. The RGB software has even been discovered to be quite buggy resulting in the software causing bootloops and therefore resetting CMOS to get out of the loop. So that you can mess with the RGB in that fashion can lead to a host of problems and possible attacks.
     
    Read more in the Twitter thread.
     
    Source: https://twitter.com/gsuberland/status/1175570500292108289
  10. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from Blatcher2 in When your phone has a faster refresh rate than most monitors in the world: the XiaoMi Black Shark 2 Pro   
    How, again, does the input lag of a display correlate with the latency of a capacitive touch layer in this instance?
     
    What's even the point?
    If the latency is accurate, then it's one of the lowest I've seen, so what exactly begs the criticism?
  11. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from Blatcher2 in When your phone has a faster refresh rate than most monitors in the world: the XiaoMi Black Shark 2 Pro   
    You don't seem to understand that touch latency isn't the same as panel latency.
  12. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from Trik'Stari in Ireland's first e-sports research lab opens   
    Well, that much is true. To many of them it's a job. It's hard to maintain personal interest after years and years of playing the same thing.
  13. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from SlimyPython in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    We should totally get wafer-sized GPUs in desktops and we'll get AMD to pay for it. What could possibly go wrong?
  14. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from leadeater in AMD Agrees To Pay Out $35 Per Chip Over FX Marketing Lawsuit   
    So when is the class action lawsuit against Nvidia gonna happen when all those CUDA cores actually amount to zero cores by even the loosest definition?
     
    Anyway the actually interesting tidbit is how many people were actually affected by deceptive marketing if we're gonna call it that.
     
    How many bought a Construction processor off the shelf and build their own PCs? And how many of those would be fooled by marketing? How many of those are enthusiasts who wait for reviews?
     
    How many buy pre-built machines? How many bought one on the basis of AMD's marketing? How many Construction-derived pre-builts were actually made and sold?
     
    Taken those things into account one would think it would be an awfully small number so it must be some opportunistic lawyers having a field day with a free paycheck. It happens all the time.
  15. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from Results45 in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    What are those Navi names supposed to indicate? We already know there's a 24 CU Navi 14.
     
    Also, I'd consider those high CU counts very much theoretical at this point. I think we'll see two (if we're lucky: 3) chips in the 50-80 CU range but I don't think it's feasible to go higher than 80 until they've had a 70-80 CU piece of working silicon in the lab and analyzed. There's too big a risk of them making another Vega/Fiji with a very wide design but being so bottlenecked that it doesn't really do anything with many of the extra execution units.
     
    What is your timeline and what is the process node?
     
    There are so many questions. I mean if AMD can execute on those figures you've listed you might hit the mark but it remains to be seen if it's feasible. I don't know if you've accounted for reduced clock speed in the big designs (does not appear so to me) but you should factor that in.
  16. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from leadeater in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    What are those Navi names supposed to indicate? We already know there's a 24 CU Navi 14.
     
    Also, I'd consider those high CU counts very much theoretical at this point. I think we'll see two (if we're lucky: 3) chips in the 50-80 CU range but I don't think it's feasible to go higher than 80 until they've had a 70-80 CU piece of working silicon in the lab and analyzed. There's too big a risk of them making another Vega/Fiji with a very wide design but being so bottlenecked that it doesn't really do anything with many of the extra execution units.
     
    What is your timeline and what is the process node?
     
    There are so many questions. I mean if AMD can execute on those figures you've listed you might hit the mark but it remains to be seen if it's feasible. I don't know if you've accounted for reduced clock speed in the big designs (does not appear so to me) but you should factor that in.
  17. Informative
    Trixanity got a reaction from porina in No Google Apps...   
    Many apps including Google's require Play Services to function. To use that you need certification. You may sideload them for personal use though. So Huawei have to use a barebones Android. They have their own app store but it's hard to move people over when they rely on Google.
  18. Funny
    Trixanity reacted to mr moose in AMD Agrees To Pay Out $35 Per Chip Over FX Marketing Lawsuit   
    Doesn't matter. I am not trying to individualize this forum to the one person.  I am addressing what I see as a trend.  That is quite a common thing people do around here.
     
    The difference is I am actually addressing the forum as a whole when I point out a trend I think is worthy of discussion and not talking to one direct person.
     
    I don't know why you keep trying to turn the whole forum into one person. If my comments don't address anything you've said then ignore them.  They are addressed at many people not just one person.
     
    Then I would suggest not using the news as your only source.  It happens in all cases larger and small.
     
    The problem is not general criticism, but that when people claim the courts (namely judges) are ignorant and never understand the technology thus make the wrong decision, then that is an absolute, it's not the sort of claim you can turn on and off depending on the outcome of any specific case.   
     
     
    Trolling is the other name for that.     You are criticizing me and not the my opinion on the topic.    If my post is not against the rules and you have nothing to say other than be critical of how I post then I suggest you learn how to ignore things.
  19. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from TechyBen in AMD Agrees To Pay Out $35 Per Chip Over FX Marketing Lawsuit   
    That's the answer to your question why people are critical of where the ruling could easily have steered towards had it gone to trial.
     
    No thanks.
  20. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from Results45 in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    We should totally get wafer-sized GPUs in desktops and we'll get AMD to pay for it. What could possibly go wrong?
  21. Informative
    Trixanity got a reaction from Results45 in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    Explicit and implicit multiGPU is terminology used in DX12 documentation.
    What I'm talking about is functionality available in DX12. It just requires game developers to code for it. I think Oxide Games had a tech demo showing off unlinked explicit multiGPU.
     
    I'll attach some images explaining each possible multiGPU implementation in DX12:
     
    One of the main points of the low level APIs was that it gave developers more control. That includes programming their own multiGPU support. It's theirs for the taking but many developers either don't have the time or the skill to do stuff like this properly so it hasn't really been used much. Initially most just relied on implicit multiGPU which is pretty much the same as SLI/Crossfire in its reliance on driver support.
     
    I don't think Windows 7 is much of a hindrance anymore. It should be noted that DX12 has been backported to W7 in some limited capacity but the future is W10 either way (whether we like it or not). I'm not sure what APIs Vulkan has regarding multiGPUs, what the capabilities are and how it's different from DX12 but I'd assume they're similar but probably not identical in feature set.
     
    Quite frankly developers have had APIs to implement multiGPU on their own for years but they're not doing anything with it so it's not that there's a technical limitation. Basically multiGPU should not rely on drivers. It's a stupid crutch. It's not the first time that we've seen driver implementations or attempts at it that yielded inconsistent or even bad results.
  22. Agree
    Trixanity got a reaction from Results45 in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    Certainly. A lot of the digital industry is overworked (software developers, video editors, digital art, animation, VFX etc) but the result is that there is a lack of attention to the technical implementations. It seems the MO is as long as it's good enough - anything more is fiddling around. That's not necessarily on the developers but on project managers and suits as you say.
     
    MultiGPU could be good if implemented properly but no one seems willing to find a good way of doing it where you avoid the pitfalls we've seen to date. Many new GPUs don't support the implicit implementations (SLI and Crossfire) anymore. Many of Nvidia's cards don't and it looks like Navi cards don't either. Developers can do it themselves but not many will and again: the quality needs to hit a certain level or it'll just create more problems. The video games industry needs an overhaul but who would be willing to spend the money on extra development time and will we see studios (in response) do even more microtransactions and lootboxes? Will they have the balls to try to increase video game prices past $60? There is a cancer growing but like many other systemic problems all the solutions are made in the name of short term gain.
  23. Informative
    Trixanity got a reaction from Results45 in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    That's a poor take on his comment. He's not a stickler for monolithic designs. He's saying developers either need to get their shit together or AMD needs to obfuscate the shit out of the chip design. We've seen how an otherwise incredibly wide uarch like GCN is sitting idle half the time and we've seen how multiGPU scaling is awful half the time and the other half it's microstuttering all over the place. Yet you're acting like it's just a matter of the interconnect and then it'll just slot in like nothing. We've also seen what a mess TR (and Ryzen in general) was on Windows until recently. These things take time to perfect and AMD has gone on record to say it isn't ready yet. So he's not just a Debbie Downer. This is a real problem. Otherwise everyone would be doing it right now. It's the most ideal scenario yet we're still doing monolithic. Things are like they are for a reason (most of the time).
  24. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from leadeater in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    We should totally get wafer-sized GPUs in desktops and we'll get AMD to pay for it. What could possibly go wrong?
  25. Funny
    Trixanity got a reaction from thorhammerz in Navi 21/23 Cards Rumored (aka "Nvidia Killers" xD)   
    We should totally get wafer-sized GPUs in desktops and we'll get AMD to pay for it. What could possibly go wrong?
×