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Trixanity

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Everything posted by Trixanity

  1. If said dude was looking at such nudes, he was probably holding a floppy anyway. Might as well recognize the attempt with a title.
  2. I imagine Google is waiting for AV1 to be complete and adopted so they can (hardware) accelerate photo and video across both client and server systems. Problem is it'll still be a long wait to get there.
  3. The 13" Razer Stealth has a GTX 1650 option. So I guess you could call that statement false. It's probably throttling like hell but still: there are lots of laptops with dedicated graphics in thin form factors. You'll just have to accept the hefty price tag and the overheating causing throttling.
  4. I bought a laptop with Windows 10 Home 1809 pre-installed. There was no option to skip the Microsoft account at all. I tried many things and going back and forth to find a skip option. I gave up and tried to login and failed (iirc). Then it gave me the option of a local user. It took some fiddling to get there at least. This is a bad change.
  5. Competition is a beautiful thing. That's a lot of profit being lifted straight out of Intel's pockets. Goes to show how crazy good the margins Intel must have had over the last decade.
  6. It's a classic case of doomed if you do and doomed if you don't. Lose the trademark or piss off a niche market? I think anyone rational would go with the latter even if it sucks to do so (for all parties).
  7. Mine was in Tech News but it got moved for whatever reason.
  8. Just read some new info: apparently you don't even need admin access. Any user has access on the basis that any user should be able to change the RGB lighting hence having read/write access. There's a lot more info but basically instead of the driver acting as a middle man to any requests from the software (and therefore acting as a gatekeeper) it just indiscriminately allows direct access to the hardware like some kind of pass-through. The bus it uses to communicate is shared so any other hardware on that bus would be compromised as well and could (if nothing else) be used to brick your stuff. Also, the NIC is supposedly on the same bus so you could use it while circumventing the OS to send packets to and from your device without you knowing it.
  9. From what I understand they'd not necessarily need physical access. I'm assuming the RGB software has admin privileges to write to the firmware and it's unlikely that the software itself is very secure so from there it's just about having remote access to the computer (or the software itself) one way or another. That RGB software can even get this much access is absolutely crazy. I'd like more high level details to completely understand the attack vector. So far this seems limited to Gigabyte motherboards (however it might be more widespread). An RGB keyboard or mouse seems to use a much simpler and more appropriate API. Regarding how and why: a clever guy being tired of the LEDs and trying to nuke the RGB software. You can get a lot of things done when you're irritated. Frustration is a powerful motivator.
  10. A guy just discovered that all the RGB controls on motherboards are designed so poorly that people can use it as a backdoor into the motherboard. It sounds like it's possible to upload various pieces of software through whatever interface/API the RGB control uses. The RGB software has even been discovered to be quite buggy resulting in the software causing bootloops and therefore resetting CMOS to get out of the loop. So that you can mess with the RGB in that fashion can lead to a host of problems and possible attacks. Read more in the Twitter thread. Source: https://twitter.com/gsuberland/status/1175570500292108289
  11. That's why you read the sources. While the best would be the Chinese ones, the translations could be off. XDA calls it touch latency as does whatever else I can find. The op also calls it 'input latency', not lag. That sounds like a translation as you'd consider touch a form of input. I've never seen anyone advertise input lag and probably with good reason: not many know what it is, not many care and the number probably sounds higher than they'd like. Touch latency, on the other hand, is often advertised to dunk on competition and to highlight responsiveness. High touch latency causes sluggish response and feel when using the device.
  12. How, again, does the input lag of a display correlate with the latency of a capacitive touch layer in this instance? What's even the point? If the latency is accurate, then it's one of the lowest I've seen, so what exactly begs the criticism?
  13. Most games aren't esports-friendly. It's actually very difficult to make one and some of the recent ones require the developer to pump lots of money into the scene to artificially kickstart it. A game like Fortnite relies solely on Chinese money to sustain it because they keep making changes favoring the casual player to the detriment of competition. From what I hear there are also lots of RNG elements which is also a big no-no; you want to keep RNG to a minimum if you want players to not get frustrated with the game mechanics.
  14. Well, that much is true. To many of them it's a job. It's hard to maintain personal interest after years and years of playing the same thing.
  15. What's interesting is that the retail box itself holds no false advertisement so you would have to look elsewhere to be mislead. So you could go into a store and pick up an FX processor, be disappointed when you got home and still be a victim of your own doing. On the topic of misleading advertisement you should look no further than Qualcomm: It's very subtle but you'd get the impression that you're buying what would be essentially 8 A76 cores when in reality they're calling both A55 and A76 (four each) the same name: Kryo 485. The clock speed advertisement is saved by the 'up to' as only one core goes that high. I've yet to see a class action lawsuit against Qualcomm despite the significant performance delta. I still see this as being an opportunistic money grab although the advertisement could be better and more accurate when it comes to some of the claims. However I still question how many buyers had actually seen much if any of the advertisement.
  16. There already is. Worked in IT support for a bit. When employees received their new TB3 docking stations for their desk it was common for them to plug the TB3 cable into the standard USB-C port resulting in nothing working.
  17. So when is the class action lawsuit against Nvidia gonna happen when all those CUDA cores actually amount to zero cores by even the loosest definition? Anyway the actually interesting tidbit is how many people were actually affected by deceptive marketing if we're gonna call it that. How many bought a Construction processor off the shelf and build their own PCs? And how many of those would be fooled by marketing? How many of those are enthusiasts who wait for reviews? How many buy pre-built machines? How many bought one on the basis of AMD's marketing? How many Construction-derived pre-builts were actually made and sold? Taken those things into account one would think it would be an awfully small number so it must be some opportunistic lawyers having a field day with a free paycheck. It happens all the time.
  18. Here in my country, three out of the big four service providers failed to protect its customers in a recent probe by journalists to see if they'd allow SIM swapping. Those three did it without any ID checks - only the phone number was required and they just handed out a SIM card on the spot. The one provider that didn't fail refused the SIM swap without a photo ID. What's odd is that none of the big news organizations are covering it despite how egregious it is although there are plenty of other scandals related to these companies such as emergency calls not working and scamming elderly customers but that's beside the point in my opinion.
  19. What are those Navi names supposed to indicate? We already know there's a 24 CU Navi 14. Also, I'd consider those high CU counts very much theoretical at this point. I think we'll see two (if we're lucky: 3) chips in the 50-80 CU range but I don't think it's feasible to go higher than 80 until they've had a 70-80 CU piece of working silicon in the lab and analyzed. There's too big a risk of them making another Vega/Fiji with a very wide design but being so bottlenecked that it doesn't really do anything with many of the extra execution units. What is your timeline and what is the process node? There are so many questions. I mean if AMD can execute on those figures you've listed you might hit the mark but it remains to be seen if it's feasible. I don't know if you've accounted for reduced clock speed in the big designs (does not appear so to me) but you should factor that in.
  20. They're stuck between a rock and a hard place. If they try to distance themselves from the CCP and China, their sales will tank in China and they lose whatever support they get from China.
  21. You can get your device registered by visiting a website and typing in your ID. It should still say uncertified but your device gets whitelisted and therefore access to services and apps. Yeah, although there is still some legal murkiness as to whether they actually use AOSP with the ban but yeah they'd have to make a fork of some kind I believe. They do have their own OS but there is some doubts whether it's properly compatible with Android apps and whether it can reasonably substitute Android.
  22. Many apps including Google's require Play Services to function. To use that you need certification. You may sideload them for personal use though. So Huawei have to use a barebones Android. They have their own app store but it's hard to move people over when they rely on Google.
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