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boricj

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About boricj

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  1. Now that Linus has a TI-84 Plus CE (shown in the graphing calculator overclocking video), maybe we can have a proper review and benchmarks of it? Post with details about suggestion:
  2. Before overjoying about Texas Instruments calculators: they've removed ASM/C support from the TI-83 Premium CE through a software upgrade. No more DOOM for you.
  3. Cool! Now all we need is the video for benchmarking Python on calculators (with a reference to the ban on ASM/C) to tear TI a new one. All details you need to start working on this are in this post: Please Linus Tech Tips! The calculator community desperately needs some leverage to make Texas Instruments fold on that one. You can probably milk the calculators you'll buy by doing additional videos on it if you need to make your money back (like doing reviews of modern graphing calculators that are not grounded in the 90s for example).
  4. You know what's even better than a segment on TechLinked? Benchmarks. A set of products, each with different characteristics, but all capable of running a common set of workload with measurable performance data points.... With Python no less. It's actually perfect for a Linus Tech Tips video: Relatable: anyone aged between 15 and 40 has most likely used one for a couple of years. Jokes potential: come on, it's graphing calculators, that stuff basically writes itself. Unexpected turn of events: who would expect graphing calculators to have color screens and run Python nowadays? Plot twists: if you thought AMD is wrecking Intel big time, wait until you see a NumWorks utterly destroy a TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python. A moral lesson at the end: a household name is not a guarantee of bang for your buck. Now where did I see that before... And most important: cheap. It's a couple of graphing calculators. Plus it would be a nice follow-up to that graphing calculator water-cooling experiment. Hey Linus! The YouTube bingo card is filled up! The power of the algorithm compels you! The set of calculators to benchmark (do double-check my list, there are similar models without Python support): NumWorks (model N110 preferably) Casio 35+E II (which should be a fx-9860GIII in North America) Casio 90+E (which should be a fx-CG50 in North America) TI-83 Premium CE Edition Python (not entirely sure if there's an international counterpart with Python support) If you can cozy up with manufacturers, official Python support is known to be in the works for the HP Prime (model G2 preferably) and the TI Nspire CX II (CAS or not). Suggested benchmarks: Integer (I suggest prime number determination and Bitcoin hash-rate) Floating-point (Riemann integral maybe?) Memory (TI-Planet has a script to allocate all the memory and print the capacity, do reset calculators beforehand) Fill rate (NumWorks has a nice Mandelbrot fractal sample, porting a bare-bones ray-tracer should be easy and TI-Planet has a cross-platform tech demo rendering of a radar) Turtle drawing speed at speed(0) And if you could put a small jab at TI for removing C and assembly features on the TI-83 Premium CE through software updates, thereby jeopardizing a rich history of video games and utilities, screwing over customers and every single developer who sank countless hours writing them, it'd be perfect.
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