Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

fordy_rounds

Member
  • Content Count

    136
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from BiG StroOnZ in My "Gradual Upgrade" Build   
    The system is built, although there's still room for improvement (details after build pics).

    Here's all the parts I needed for this, except the case. (Also, I've been using the PSU already, so it's not new; I just included it here for thoroughness.

    That beautiful Ryzen CPU slotted into place. This is the best CPU I've ever owned, and I'm super excited about it.

    A single 8GB stick of T-Force Vulcan Z 3200MHz RAM. I plan to double (or more) this eventually, but this is all that fit in the budget at the moment. Also, using the stock cooler (subject to change, see my discussion of thermals later).

    Added the GPU to the bench build so I could make sure it all worked before installing into my case. It posted, and into the case it went.

    Beginning the install into my case, so the GPU had to come out (temporarily).

    And, the final build (pictured with side panel off to avoid reflections in the glass).
     
    It performs pretty well, and so far I've been pretty happy with it, though I haven't had a ton of time to play with it.
    However....
    I installed Folding@Home. I set it to fold on High, and my CPU hit thermal limits. I set it to medium, and I was still well into the 90s. Even on Light, I get into the 80s. So yeah, that's gonna be a problem....
    Right now, as you can see in the pics, I have only one case fan, set as an intake; since, on the old build, the GPU consistently got warmer than the CPU, I put it down low to blow fresh air toward the GPU. In this setup, I think (for the short term) I need to move it up to blow fresh air over the CPU (or change it to exhaust from the CPU area, though I like the idea of having it positive-pressured), as I think the problem is that the CPU cooler (in addition to being the stock cooler) is just recycling hot air around itself, so the air never gets a proper chance to cool down, resulting in quickly rising temps.
    The longer term solutions, of course, are to add case fans and upgrade the CPU cooler. I'm thinking of going with a liquid AIO, purely for aesthetic reasons. I don't like the look of most aftermarket air coolers, as they tend to be big and bulky; I just like how comparatively sleek and sexy liquid cooling can be, though I don't want the expense or trouble of going with a custom loop. On the other hand, they're also more expensive—though I can get a cheap AIO for about the cost of some decent fans and air cooler, and it includes the radiator fans (which would also act as the case's intake fans; this case only supports a front-mounted radiator, as there's just not enough clearance between the top and the MB). So, things to consider. Any advice or recommendations?
  2. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from BiG StroOnZ in My "Gradual Upgrade" Build   
    Well, the GT 430 came in Saturday. I got it plugged in, installed drivers, and it works! This is, despite being a card from 2010, light-years ahead of the integrated graphics. I'm very happy with it.
     
    Some pics:

    Started out by re-casing the motherboard, since I already had the PSU cables loosely run through the PS15.


    Unboxing the 1650 Super.

    And installed. Too bad it wasn't compatible.

    The $15 GT 430.

    The two cards, for comparison. Styles sure have changed.

    Finally, the working GT 430 installed. This is how things are going to stay for a little while. The cable management is messy; I can't plug in the USB 3 cable into this motherboard, since there's no header for it, and I don't want to zip tie all the cables into place until I have my final parts, in case header locations are different.
    I ran Civilization 5 on medium-high settings, and got about 31FPS in normal mode. (By comparison, I was getting 20 in strategic mode and 1ish on normal mode, all on lowest settings, on the integrated carp.) I ran Civ 6 on lowest settings (I'm technically a little under spec for CPU, GPU, and system RAM) and got 30FPS. I ran Hue (admittedly not a graphically intense game, but an interesting little platformer) and got over 100FPS (though anything over 59 is overkill, since my monitor's refresh rate is 59Hz...). I'm really happy with this, and can't wait to see how the much better, much more modern 1650 Super will do.
    About that.... I planned to return the 1650 Super and use the money to get my next motherboard, RAM, and CPU, which I would then use with the 430 for a few months until I could afford the better GPU again. Unfortunately, between restocking fees and shipping, I realized I'd lose about $45 if I did so. I decided that wasn't worth it, so it's going to sit on my shelf for a few months. I went ahead and submitted for a rebate on it, so that decision is irreversible.
  3. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Demonic Donut in Sense pin in Sys_Fan   
    This is pretty normal for 4-pin fan splitters. The pins are, in order: ground, 12V*, sense, and PWM. The sense pin is actually for your fan to send a signal back to the motherboard about how fast the fan is spinning. When your fan control software gives you an RPM, that's how it knows. However, because it's from the fan to the motherboard, it would be a problem if two fans tried to connect to it at the same time. They'd end up just giving garbage information to the MB. So, the splitter has it pinned through to what you might call a "master" fan; only this fan gets to report its RPM. The other fan(s) on the splitter don't get to report their speed, but they can still be controlled by PWM (which is connected to all the fans, on pin 4).
    Note, too, that I put an asterisk on the 12V pin. Some fans don't have a PWM connector; these have to be controlled by voltage control instead, which is that, rather than providing a steady 12V and controlling speed with a separate signal, the MB actually changes the voltage on the 12V line to be less than 12V in order to run at a slower speed. Note, though, that the fan can still send its RPM over pin 3 (unless it's on the disconnected side of a splitter). If you mix PWM (4-pin) and Voltage (3-pin) fans on a splitter, the 3-pin fans will run at full-blast all the time. That's not recommended.
  4. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Technous285 in Sense pin in Sys_Fan   
    This is pretty normal for 4-pin fan splitters. The pins are, in order: ground, 12V*, sense, and PWM. The sense pin is actually for your fan to send a signal back to the motherboard about how fast the fan is spinning. When your fan control software gives you an RPM, that's how it knows. However, because it's from the fan to the motherboard, it would be a problem if two fans tried to connect to it at the same time. They'd end up just giving garbage information to the MB. So, the splitter has it pinned through to what you might call a "master" fan; only this fan gets to report its RPM. The other fan(s) on the splitter don't get to report their speed, but they can still be controlled by PWM (which is connected to all the fans, on pin 4).
    Note, too, that I put an asterisk on the 12V pin. Some fans don't have a PWM connector; these have to be controlled by voltage control instead, which is that, rather than providing a steady 12V and controlling speed with a separate signal, the MB actually changes the voltage on the 12V line to be less than 12V in order to run at a slower speed. Note, though, that the fan can still send its RPM over pin 3 (unless it's on the disconnected side of a splitter). If you mix PWM (4-pin) and Voltage (3-pin) fans on a splitter, the 3-pin fans will run at full-blast all the time. That's not recommended.
  5. Like
    fordy_rounds reacted to MaximumBubbleMods in Spirit of Motion - Scratchbuild Log   
    Who else is happy about this long weekend?!
     
    So that back of the grill had some tails that needed to be cut off now that the shaping is all done. I started by putting a little tape on the back plate to protect it slightly. I grabbed a reciprocating saw, threw a couple drops of oil on the blade and chopped the pieces off as close to the backplate as I could.
     





    The vibrations of the saw broke one of the little welds on a grill unfortunately. With the hours of grinding, sanding, sawing, ect. I've definitely learned that small aluminum welds are not really as strong as you would hope.
     
    I started grinding what was left off with a rough fiber wheel on the grinder.
     





    I was a little discouraged at the welds being less strong than I hoped and the one that was now broken. These welds to the backplate are where all the force of the grill hangs from the grill is opened. So they need to be well attached so this lasts a very long time.
     
    I made the choice to screw them to the back plate. Using some nice looking M3, black, button head cap screws to be exact. I marked out the center points to start.
     





    Now most of these were welded so I had to drill through the grills and backplate together with my 2.5mm drill (the one for tapping M3 threads) I then came back with a 3.5mm drill and drilled through only the grills so that I was only tapping the backplate. I then ran my M3 tap through all the holes in the backplate.
     





    I put my screws in and like how it looks a lot! Kind of gives your eye something to stop on when you look down the length of the grill.
     



  6. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from ShrimpBrime in Can I fit a 3 slot GPU in here?   
    You'll cover both of your x1 slots, but other than that, I don't see why not.
  7. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from TVwazhere in Good budget matx case Fall 2020   
    I'm using the Silverstone PS15 right now. It's got a mesh front and top, with a separate bottom intake for the PSU. Fits 3x2.5" drives and one either 2.5 or 3.5 (though I'm using that space as a cable basement instead of a drive bay). Has a tempered glass side panel, and comes in black or white. https://www.amazon.com/SilverStone-Technology-Micro-ATX-Computer-PS15B-G/dp/B07N1HL5PR/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=ps15&qid=1596666679&sr=8-4 (comes only with a rear exhaust fan) or https://www.amazon.com/SilverStone-Technology-SST-PS15B-RGB-Micro-ATX-PS15B-RGB/dp/B07SNFQVYS/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=ps15&qid=1596666719&sr=8-2 (with extra (RGB) fans).
  8. Agree
    fordy_rounds reacted to Windows7ge in Can i hook up 1 hard drive up to 2 pcs/xboxes   
    No. Only one system can have access to the drive at a time. The correct solution here would be to setup the drive on the network and have each system connect to it that way.
  9. Like
    fordy_rounds reacted to MaximumBubbleMods in Spirit of Motion - Scratchbuild Log   
    Back with an update on the build!
     
    It is time to start working on the grill portion of the build again. The spine and individual grill pieces were all filed to fit one another tightly the last time I worked on the grill. So before I can weld them together I need to polish the top, bottom, and back of each grill since it will be impossible to do this after welding.
    I started with the inside of grills. This doesn't need a full polish so I went ahead and left this all a brushed finish. The grit was 120. I used some bee wax on the sand paper every once in a while to really extend the life I got out of the paper by limiting how much it gummed up (If you have sanded much aluminum you know the struggle I'm talking about). I was able to get all the sanding done with a single sleeve.
     







    Because most of the material I'm sanding is only 1/4" thick I grabbed a couple pieces of wood to use as spacers so that I could utilize as much of the sleeve as possible. It did make the process a little bit slower but I didn't want to waste so much of the sleeve.
     



     
    I think it will be almost hard to notice that the inside is not polished like the rest and it saved me a tremendous amount of time by not having to polish out the additional material.




  10. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from DutchGuyTom in Are These Good parts?   
    PCPartPicker Part List Type Item Price CPU AMD Ryzen 3 3200G 3.6 GHz Quad-Core Processor $99.99 @ Amazon Motherboard Gigabyte B450M DS3H Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $72.99 @ Best Buy Memory Kingston HyperX Fury 8 GB (1 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 CL16 Memory   Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 1 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive $47.99 @ Amazon Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Best Buy Power Supply Thermaltake Smart 500 W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply $50.99 @ B&H Custom Wigbow 1 Pack - 2 Grams Thermal Compound Paste, Carbon Based High Performance heatsink Paste, Thermal Compound CPU for all Cooler computer PC Fan $6.99 @ Amazon   Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts     Total $348.94   Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-27 15:23 EDT-0400    
    Converted it to PCPP on behalf of OP.
     
    OP: I wouldn't call these good parts, but they're not terrible. Within a $450 budget still, here's what I'd do:
    PCPartPicker Part List Type Item Price CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3400G 3.7 GHz Quad-Core Processor $149.88 @ Amazon Motherboard Gigabyte B450M DS3H Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $72.99 @ Best Buy Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-2666 CL15 Memory $37.99 @ Newegg Storage Silicon Power A55 512 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $48.99 @ Amazon Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Best Buy Power Supply Thermaltake Smart 500 W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply $50.99 @ B&H   Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts     Total $430.83   Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-07-27 15:27 EDT-0400   Changes I made:
    I upgraded you from the 3200G (4C4T, Vega 8 graphics) to the 3400G (4C8T, Vega 11 graphics) for better performance. I kept your RAM at 8G, but swapped a single channel to stick to a pair for faster dual-channel use. I dropped your storage down to a half-terabyte (still plenty for your stated use case) but upgraded it to SSD. As a person who recently bought their first SSD, I can tell you, it makes a world of a difference. Nobody should have their boot drive on spinning disk in 2020. If you still want a terabyte, you can add another half-terabyte of HDD for around $25. I got rid of the thermal paste completely. You don't need it. The 3400G's stock cooler (and pretty much all stock coolers) comes with thermal paste pre-applied, and it's plenty, you don't need more. If you buy another cooler later on, consider getting some at that point (but first make sure the cooler doesn't come with it pre-applied. No sense spending money you don't need to.)
  11. Like
    fordy_rounds reacted to MaximumBubbleMods in Spirit of Motion - Scratchbuild Log   
    That sounds terrible! Now, mistake time!
     
    So I got the one sheet metal piece that I had made by a local shop. The lightly textured black powder coat and workmanship look sooooo good.
     



     
    The excitement was short lived though as I instantly noticed that I messed up pretty badly. BUT... fixable. I forgot the power supply fan hole so I measured it and marked where I was going to need a big hole in my brand new sheet metal part.
     



     
    I put a scrap piece of wood behind the cavity, clamped it to the corner of the table and I grabbed a metal blade for the jigsaw. This is the bottom of the case but I could have preserved the powder coat finish better if I would have lay masking tape or painters tape all over that bottom surface. Hindsight. Applied some oil and went to carefully cutting out the hole.
     



     
    I took my time and the jig saw did a pretty good job besides some scratching of the powder coat. I grabbed a couple files and smoothed the edges just a little before sanding the inside edge with some 80 grit sandpaper. Ended up being nice and smooth to the touch once I was done.
     



     
    Could have all been avoided work but I'm glad it was something easily fixed without compromise.
  12. Informative
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from wall03 in My "Gradual Upgrade" Build   
    Well, not content to just wait it out a few more months, I "sprung" for a $15 used EVGA GT 430 1GB. It's from 2010, the EL1358G is from 2010-11, so I'm hoping that, being from the same era, they'll work together. It's not as large of an upgrade as the 1650 Super, but it's still a definite step up from the integrated carp, and it'll get me by for a few months. I will return and report once it comes.
  13. Informative
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from wall03 in My "Gradual Upgrade" Build   
    Well, the GPU still isn't working. I suspect it just isn't supported by the motherboard, and there's probably nothing I can do about it. I posted about it in the troubleshooting board, but have only gotten one response.
     
    I did go ahead and splurge on the SSD, though, picked up a WD Blue 500GB (2.5") for $70 (tax included) at Walmart. Yes, there's cheaper half-terabyte drives out there, but I wanted it now as opposed to waiting for shipping.
  14. Informative
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Bombastinator in Weird issue with case USB.   
    Is the controller a USB 1.0 device? (Some, especially older, peripherals are—even some things like printers, if they didn't need 2.0 speeds or pre-date 2.0, they went with 1.0.) I ask, because Windows recently had an update where they disabled the use of 1.0 devices on 3.0 ports. So the controller might need to be plugged into a 2.0 port, even if that's inconveniently on the back of the PC.
  15. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Javiee2001 in Will the GTX 1650 be compatible with some of my ancient hardware?   
    I recently ordered a 1650 super for my old hardware (basically doing the same thing as you). It's an old eMachines EL1358G (even older hardware than yours), recased to support full-height cards, and with a new PSU. My only worry is that the Motherboard BIOS might not support it.... I'll let you know after I try it out.
    My plan is for my next upgrade to be MB, CPU, and RAM (all at once because compatibility), which I'm pretty sure is what @TofuHaroto means by moving to a different platform.
    Also, make sure your PSU has enough wattage and enough 6/8-pin connectors for whatever card you end up getting.
  16. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Master Disaster in What is the difference between nfc, rfid and a regular antenna?   
    An important difference is that RFID and NFC both require a coil antenna, while wifi usually is a straight antenna. This is important, because the coil antenna acts as an inductor, inducing current when exposed to a magnetic field. That's how NFC/RFID devices can be battery-less (e.g. a scannable badge, a toll-road sticker, etc.); they get their power wirelessly from the "reader." The reader also has to have a coil so that its current induces the right magnetic field. If you replaced that with a wifi antenna, it won't induce the magnetic field, and your tags won't get the field they need to power on.
  17. Informative
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from wall03 in My "Gradual Upgrade" Build   
    In transit, delivery expected on Wednesday.
  18. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Shirolmao in My "Gradual Upgrade" Build   
    Well, I did it. Just ordered a 1650 Super. Here goes hoping it works with the old system. I'll update this again once it comes in and gets installed/tested.
  19. Informative
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from kinnith in What will I choose to bottleneck?   
    I'd probably do both the GPU and RAM, if you can; otherwise, just the GPU.
    And if you go CPU, be aware that Zen 2 is the 3600/3700, not 2600/2700 (those are Zen+).
  20. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from WinterLFG in PCIe lane splitup for m.2/cpu/gpu   
    This depends on your motherboard, but, as I understand it, it's usually pre-split (by default) as 16 to the GPU, 4 to the main M.2. Your bios may allow you to split the 16 down to 8 and hook the extra 8 to the next slot down; this is particularly useful for SLI/Crossfire setups, though that's certainly not the only use case.
    The second M.2 slot (as well as the PCIe slots other than the top one, or top two if they can be split) is often hooked to the chipset rather than direct to the CPU. (The chipset can provide a whole bunch of extra lanes, and basically acts as a switch/multiplexer to connect them to the CPU.)
  21. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from -rascal- in PCIe lane splitup for m.2/cpu/gpu   
    This depends on your motherboard, but, as I understand it, it's usually pre-split (by default) as 16 to the GPU, 4 to the main M.2. Your bios may allow you to split the 16 down to 8 and hook the extra 8 to the next slot down; this is particularly useful for SLI/Crossfire setups, though that's certainly not the only use case.
    The second M.2 slot (as well as the PCIe slots other than the top one, or top two if they can be split) is often hooked to the chipset rather than direct to the CPU. (The chipset can provide a whole bunch of extra lanes, and basically acts as a switch/multiplexer to connect them to the CPU.)
  22. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Lurick in I would like some clarification on B550 capabilities   
    Not an expert here, but:
    1. The purpose of the chipset is (among other things) to act as a multiplexer. Essentially, it's based on the idea that most of the time, not all your lanes will be saturated. So it provides 8 lanes, and as long as they're not saturated, it can combine their traffic onto the four lanes. If they collectively get too saturated, then they'll slow down to wait for other traffic, but one or two or even four lanes can, in theory, be saturated without issue. In other words, you can use all 8 lanes, you just can't saturate all 8 lanes.
    2. This depends on which port you use. Notice that the CPU can provide up to 4 10Gbps ports on its own, without the chipset. Read the MB manual to make sure you're using those ports (probably the rear-panel ports) and it won't affect your chipset bandwidth.
    3. Be aware that B550 is not slated to support 3000-series APUs, and 4000-series APUs haven't come out yet. That means that, until they do, any B550 build will need a discrete GPU (or be run completely 100% headless, without even having an option to plug in a monitor for troubleshooting). Since most mini-ITX boards only have one PCIe slot, that'll leave you with nowhere to plug in the raid card. (Just because the chipset supports extra lanes, doesn't mean the motherboard has all the physical slots.) So you might need to upgrade to a micro-ATX board. (You could also get creative with M.2 to PCIe adapters, i.e. plug the dGPU into an adapter that's plugged into one of the M.2 slots—but then you're limiting your NVME storage.)
    4. Finally, since storage is the main point here, I'd recommend putting your RAID card on the direct-to-CPU lanes (usually the top slot in a micro - or ATX board, and the only slot in a mini-ITX board) and your GPU in a chipset slot. That's backwards from normal, but you're not using it for heavy gaming, so it'll be fine.
     
  23. Agree
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from kb5zue in Laptop refuses to show any sign of life (besides teasing a bit)   
    Sounds like maybe the power distribution circuitry might be broken (i.e. the circuitry from plug to battery and the rest of the PC). If you bought it just days ago, I'd take it back to the store or RMA it.
  24. Like
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from CoolerCooler in Laptop refuses to show any sign of life (besides teasing a bit)   
    Sounds like maybe the power distribution circuitry might be broken (i.e. the circuitry from plug to battery and the rest of the PC). If you bought it just days ago, I'd take it back to the store or RMA it.
  25. Informative
    fordy_rounds got a reaction from Schykle in Spanned Volumes With Striped Wear?   
    It sounds like maybe you want RAID 1+0 aka RAID 10. It does stripe, but it also mirrors, so you can fault a drive without losing the entire array. It does cut your capacity in half due to the mirroring, and requires a minimum of 4 drives.
×