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Zm1TDkSnQkY4KEqskCARSBpk

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About Zm1TDkSnQkY4KEqskCARSBpk

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  1. The phone is "detected" as in my laptop can get the identification information from the phone, but the phone does not respond to USB Mass Storage, MTP, ADB, or Fastboot. Do you have any suggestions for specific programs? I've tried a couple, and all the ones I can find can't find anything and look like they'll paywall my data once they determine that they are able to recover it.
  2. I am unwilling to enable hyperthreading because Shintel hasn't released a zombieload patch for this CPU, but the other two are enabled.
  3. Why are they even using a GT210 at all when the point is to build the cheapest possible PC with just brand new parts? It doesn't make sense to me.
  4. Is there a Linux equivalent for throttlestop? I do not have Windows installed on this computer, and do not wish to destroy it. Also, my BIOS does not offer any CPU speed settings other than enabling and disabling speed step, turbo boost, and hyper threading. Does having speed step and turbo boost on cause the necessary configuration to be applied?
  5. What exactly counts as "stressful?" I imagine it wouldn't spend much time at all core turbo, but if I'm running a heavy single-threaded workload, that should still cause one core to turbo, at least for a little bit, right? I'm not seeing that either. Does it only happen when the other cores are at the minimum 930 MHz? That "decent price" is way more than I'm willing to pay. At that price, we're entering the level of new low-end processors that still have more computing power than what the 920/940XM can offer. That's also dangerously close to the price of getting a newer (but still used) laptop, which should still have more computing power while using less power. Additionally, the main difference from the CPU I already have appears to be that Shintel has removed artificial limits that they have imposed on my CPU, which should not exist on any CPU. This reminds me of Tesla intentionally limiting motor current and battery charge levels, then charging people to have those artificial limits removed so they can make use of the hardware that they already have. Fuck that. I'm never going to buy from either company until they clean up their act. How is the 45W limit enforced? Does the CPU know how much power it consumes at any given frequency without actually measuring, or does it measure its power consumption? If it's the latter, is it something that I can desolder, short out, or otherwise tamper with to make the CPU think that it's using 0W at all times, like I've seen being done in the RTX 2080 overclocking video? I seem to have found someone doing this exact thing on a non-K i7-8550U, which is why I thought I could do it. https://gist.github.com/Mnkai/5a8edd34bd949199224b33bd90b8c3d4. However, Intel's documentation does not appear to tell me where MSR_RAPL_POWER_UNIT and MSR_PKG_POWER_LIMIT is on my CPU, and 0x606h, 0x610h (the ones used on the page) does not seem to be readable or writable. I do have MSR_PLATFORM_INFO and MSR_TURBO_RATIO_LIMIT, but I cannot adjust MSR_TURBO_RATIO_LIMIT. Do MSR_RAPL_POWER_UNIT and MSR_PKG_POWER_LIMIT even exist on my CPU?
  6. If I can't make it turbo beyond what it's supposed to, is there a way to at least make it turbo the way that it is supposed to? It seems like it really does not want to go above base. Also, why the fuck are 920XMs going for $50 and 940XMs going for $100? They're 10 years old. If I absolutely must spend money (thanks Intel), I'd rather get a more recent laptop than spend more money on this one, especially since I'll have to replace the entire laptop when I go to college anyways.
  7. I'm on a Dell Precision M4500 laptop with an Intel Core i7-740QM processor. I've noticed that sometimes, my machine's CPU performance is a little bit less than what I want (shoutout to Google Docs), but the system is only on base clocks or barely turbo-ing, so I think there may be more performance available. I tried the laptop and prebuilt subforum and got no responses, so I'm trying here because it seems to have more activity, even if my post is not a 100% perfect fit. I've done some research and found out that the reason why non-K series CPUs cannot be overclocked is because the CPU has a hardware limit for how fast the onboard clock multiplier will run, and screwing with the clock input provided by the motherboard will cause more problems than it will solve and probably can't even be done with my motherboard. However, I've also heard that the CPU frequency is controlled with software, and therefore it should be possible to override the default turbo behavior with whatever I want from within the operating system. I've also heard that the maximum frequencies under given conditions are really just suggestions built into the processor that the CPU governor obeys, other than the maximum frequency that the processor is capable of being a hard limit. If what I've said so far is correct, that means that even though it is technically out of spec, I should be capable of using some msr hacks to force my CPU to turbo even when it doesn't want to and beyond what it is rated to be able to do, such as the single-core frequency on all cores. According to cpupower, this frequency is 2.93 GHz, which is substantially more than the 1.73 GHz base clock. So, am I able to do this? I haven't found anything that's super convincing either way. If so, I can't find any easy to follow guides about how to do it. If not, what exactly is preventing me from doing it and what is the closest I can get to what I want? Additionally, I understand that running at a higher frequency means more power consumption and therefore more heat because thermodynamics. My laptop runs at about 80°C in its current state, leaving about 20°C of difference to the 100°C maximum temperature rating of my CPU. Is that enough headroom to do this, or do I need more cooling? If so, how much additional cooling do I need? Can I install a desktop cooler on a laptop motherboard (I don't mind cutting a hole in the bottom of my laptop) to provide this additional headroom? The fact that my laptop uses PGA988 suggests that there's some kind of standard form factor that a cooler could be made for, but the fact that it appears to be a mobile-only socket suggests that maybe nobody thought of actually producing such a cooler. Are alternative means of mounting the cooler a good idea or would they not provide good enough contact? Can I make my own cooler with materials like foil or pipes? Do I instead need to provide more airflow, such as by rewiring the fan to the 19V power supply input rather than the 12V fan connector? Or am I worrying about this too much?
  8. I'm on a Dell Precision M4500 laptop with an Intel Core i7-740QM processor. I've noticed that sometimes, my machine's CPU performance is a little bit less than what I want (shoutout to Google Docs), but the system is only on base clocks or barely turbo-ing. I've done some research and found out that the reason why non-K series CPUs cannot be overclocked is because the CPU has a hardware limit for how fast the onboard clock multiplier will run, and screwing with the clock input provided by the motherboard will cause more problems than it will solve and probably can't even be done with my motherboard. However, I've also heard that the CPU frequency is controlled with software, and therefore it should be possible to override the default turbo behavior with whatever I want from within the operating system. I've also heard that the maximum frequencies under given conditions are really just suggestions built into the processor that the CPU governor obeys, other than the maximum frequency that the processor is capable of being a hard limit. If what I've said so far is correct, that means that even though it is technically out of spec, I should be capable of using some msr hacks to force my CPU to turbo even when it doesn't want to and beyond what it is rated to be able to do, such as the single-core frequency on all cores. According to cpupower, this frequency is 2.93 GHz, which is substantially more than the 1.73 GHz base clock. So, am I able to do this? If so, I can't find any easy to follow guides about how to do it. If not, what exactly is preventing me from doing it and what is the closest I can get to what I want? Additionally, I understand that running at a higher frequency means more power consumption and therefore more heat because thermodynamics. My laptop runs at about 80°C in its current state, leaving about 20°C of difference to the 100°C maximum temperature rating of my CPU. Is that enough headroom to do this, or do I need more cooling? If so, how much additional cooling do I need? Can I install a desktop cooler on a laptop motherboard (I don't mind cutting a hole in the bottom of my laptop) to provide this additional headroom? The fact that my laptop uses PGA988 suggests that there's some kind of standard form factor that a cooler could be made for, but the fact that it appears to be a mobile-only socket suggests that maybe nobody thought of actually producing such a cooler. Are alternative means of mounting the cooler a good idea or would they not provide good enough contact? Can I make my own cooler with materials like foil or pipes? Do I instead need to provide more airflow, such as by rewiring the fan to the 19V power supply input rather than the 12V fan connector? Or am I worrying about this too much?
  9. That sounds like an issue with an internal voltage regulator or capacitor. Did you check to make sure that all voltage rails are at the appropriate values?
  10. Yeah, I was intending to not glue where I know the vents ere, and I was planning on gluing with either a glue gun or epoxy. Duct tape and electrical tape were my backup plans if my parents weren't going to let me use the epoxy because I think we're out of glue sticks for the glue gun. I'm in the US, but $15-$20 is more than I want to spend, and most laptop stands I've seen lift the laptop way too much for it to be comfortable to use the keyboard. But I can go with that if I find one that's cheap enough and doesn't lift the laptop too much. Yeah, it is much louder and also makes my laptop vibrate noticeably. That might not be the best thing for the environments I use my laptop in, but it works.
  11. Technically, I could replace the laptop, but I'd rather not because this one isn't obsolete or too broken yet. I'll replace it when I go to college (I'm a high school junior now) because this one lasts like an hour to an hour and a half on it's current battery, and replacing it would be more cost effective and might even straight up cost less than buying enough batteries to power it all day. Zen 2 or 3 on mobile looks like it's going to be great, so at the very least I want to wait for that. What's wrong with gluing things to the bottom? They don't have anything, but I found an unofficial package to disable BIOS fan control, and I was able to get my fan to 4850 RPM, which I think will help. Is it bad for my fan to run it over 1000 rpm faster than my BIOS drives it?
  12. I've been trying to troubleshoot some performance issues on my laptop. Basically, after a while of watching youtube videos or playing games, my framerate will drop quite a lot (for example, 20fps to 2fps in Minecraft) and my CPU load will increase to 100% overall if it's not already there. I've noticed a correlation between this happening and my laptop being warm, so I checked my temperatures. Both my CPU and GPU are about 60 while idle, 75-80 during normal use, and 85-90 when gaming, although it takes a long time to get to 90. I got this information using lm-sensors, but my GPU driver configuration application consistently reports the GPU as being 3-5 degrees hotter than lm-sensors says it is, and I'm not sure which is more accurate. (Unless otherwise stated, all temperatures in this post are from lm-sensors.) When the bad performance starts happening, my keyboard and trackpad are noticeably warm, my left speaker grill is very warm, and the air blowing out of the side is uncomfortably hot. Despite this, both my CPU and GPU claim to not be throttling. /proc/cpuinfo reports the CPU sustaining base clock on all cores, and I don't think this CPU (i7-740QM) supports all core boost, and my GPU driver reports that the GPU is on the highest "performance level" from 0-2. However, I found that if I take the bottom panel off of my laptop and lift it off the table with two flash drives and a microsd card reader, the temperatures dropped (still 60 when idle, but now 60-70 during normal use and barely getting over 80 in games) and performance issues disappeared. This leaves me with a few questions. I thought throttling wasn't supposed to kick in until around 100 degrees, or is that just for CPUs? Is there a way to patch my GPU driver or firmware to let the GPU get hotter before throttling, and is this safe to do? If the issue seems to be more airflow related, does this mean that my previous suspicion that there was a problem with the thermal paste can now be dismissed, or is there a way to tell if that problem exists too? I want a more permanent solution than putting my laptop on flash drives everywhere I go. I'm thinking about gluing a couple layers of cardboard to the bottom (obviously not over the air intakes) to give it clearance. Will that be enough, or should I glue something thicker and more solid? Even at those temperatures, my BIOS isn't driving the fan quite as hard as I know it can go. (My BIOS drives it at about 3800 RPM, and I know it's capable of at least 4000 because if I stop my fan with my fingers, it will run at about 4000 RPM for a few seconds before dropping down to 3800 again.) Is there a way to fix that on Dell laptops? I don't want to cut the PWM wire because I still want variable fan speed and also don't know which one is the PWM wire, but I want to either fix the fan curve or have my OS control the fan so it gets driven at full power. Right now, if I write something to /sys/class/hwmon/hwmon1/pwm1, the fan jumps to the new speed, but then quickly jumps back to the old speed.
  13. There seems to be nvidia's built in configuration tool and greenwithenvy, neither of which are actually useful. `sudo nvidia-smi --query-supported-clocks=gr --format=csv` is supposed to be able to display the clock speed, but simply displays "not supported." Why would my GPU/drivers be trying to hide this information from me? I have two more ideas, but I'm not sure if they are very good either. One is to try to hexedit the driver or firmware to change the temperature that throttling happens at, and the other is to connect my laptop fan to a higher voltage so it runs faster. The problem is both of those ideas create a risk of breaking more things.
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