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Midnitewolf

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About Midnitewolf

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  1. From what I have been seeing stock vs stock, you would see around a 20-25% performance increase with a 3600 vs 2600 however, the 3600 (or any Ryzen 3000 series) doesn't have much OC'ing headroom so I am not sure how much real performance difference you would see over your current set up. You might want to just wait. In fact there are some rumors that Ryzen 4000 will be out some time next year though I am not expecting anything until late in the year if it does come out.
  2. If your not married to having to have an Nvidia card I would recommend a 5700xt. The 5700 XT is just a better choice for the money considering that the 2060 Super is about the same cost at quite a bit less performance. The only thing you would be missing is the ray tracing and considering how badly ray tracing eats into performance, I don't really feel you get much use out of it on a 2060/2070 level of GPU. It is an almost 50% drop in fps to enable it and most of the games that use ray tracing are very demanding titles that are a bit of a struggle for the 2060 on high settings and above anyway.
  3. That Arctic Cooler 34 Esports Duo is a very good budget cooler. From the reviews I have seen, it outperforms AMDs stock cooler by about 6-8 degrees on an open air bench. I would also imagine that since it would almost completely direct the hot air out of the case rather than just venting it into the case like the stock cooler does, that you would seem some performance increase from that as well and might even be able to shave a few degrees off the GPU temps since not as much hot air would be lingering in the case. All-in-all it would probably be the best $40 investment you made.
  4. Ryzen 3000 doesn't have much overclocking headroom but some people are having success getting a bit more performance out of them with an all clock boost. However, in most cases the performance increase is minimal, just 2-3% over stock. Memory on the other hand seems to be where you can get the most performance gain. Ryzen seems to like high frequency and low latency. 3600 CL 16 or 3200 CL 14 seems to be a sweet spot from a price to performance standpoint. Still even here I am not sure your getting all that much of a boost, maybe 3-5% with good memory and tight timings. The reason I mention this is that I am not sure it is really worth the effort to overclock Ryzen 3000 but I am sure there are ton of people who will disagree.
  5. I think 40 db is what most consider quite though not silent. For myself I am the odd man out. I want my fans to be loud, in fact with my current PC, I have to turn on a fan or else I go bonkers because there isn't enough white noise and its too quite.
  6. I am agreed with Plutosaurus here. Sleep mode generally has always resulted in problems at some point. I mean everything can go fine for months on end but then something just kind of goes wonky. Turning your PC off when you finished is just so much more reliable.
  7. Unfortunately it is looking like it might be 6-8 months from now at least. AMD is rumored to be making an announcement at CES 2020 in regards to their high end GPU (2080/2080 ti competition) and Nvidia might release/announce the 2080 Ti Super to counter this but even if the 5800/5900 series is announced by AMD, it will be at least 3 months before they release for sale. Amphere, Nvidia's high end is supposed to release somewhere around Q3 2020 as well. Also, the Radeon 5500/5700 series of cards is technically next gen so you can sort of say that the next gen cards are already here.
  8. Was going to mention this. It also has some of the best cooling performance out due to the fact its radiator is I think 7-10mm thicker than most of the competing products. Also while most reviews felt that the fan on the water block would be just a gimmick, it apparently does work to cool the VRM with most tests showing about a 5-6 degree drop in VRM temps. The price on these are phenomenal as well. I have one on order and will be installing it into my new build soon. My only concern about this AIO is that the pump is a completely brand new design, designed by Arctic themselves so we have next to zero information about its reliability. Also the AIO only has a 2-year warranty which kind of says to me they might be questioning the long term reliability of the pump as well or at least hedging their bets just in case it isn't all that reliable. As for other AIOs, I believe the Fractal design Celsius S36 and maybe other sizes in the Celsius line also only use a single cable for pump and fan operation, also hidden in the tube braiding. It doesn't seem to cool quite as well as the Liquid Freezer II of the same size but I believe it uses a Asetek pump and has a 5 year warranty so you know what your getting into a bit better. It is also fairly inexpensive. Both are no frills though. No RGB anywhere.
  9. I would go with a 5700 XT but keep in mind, none of those cards are powerful enough for 1440p at 144hz on the most demanding titles out there. A 2070 Super can only maintain about 70 fps on RDR2 at High Settings with a 9900k OC'ed to 5.0 Ghz under the hood. The good new is that with the majority of games out today, you would absolutely be able to take advantage of both 1440p and a 144 Hz refresh rate with either the 5700xt or a 2070 Super. They are great cards as long as you recognize where their limits lie.
  10. I agree about the Intel security issues. Forthe vast majority of Intel users, those big headline security problems will never come up but my point is for some, they are a major issue. However, a 20-30 seconds vs 10 seconds post time is more of a nitpick than an issue and honestly most of the RAM issues I have seen comes from users trying to maximize frequencies and tighten timings, rather than someone just dropping in a compatible stick. I would even go as far as saying that most of the RAM pickiness has been removed from the Ryzen 3000 generation. Sure Ryzen is sensitive to RAM speed and timing and you can get a significant performance boost by min-maxing RAM performance to match the Ryzen processor but again, this isn't an actual issue or problem, rather it is more along to lines of being more of a challenge to optimize and nothing more. Also I am not saying there isn't differences between Intel and Ryzen because their are. I mean the differences are obvious, Intel tends to be faster in gaming, while Ryzen is much faster in productivity. However the fact that Intel can't compete with Ryzen in productivity doesn't mean Intel processors have issues, they work just fine and are good CPUs. Same for the POST times. Maybe Ryzen can't compete with Intel in how fast it can POST but that doesn't mean an issue exists because of it. I mean we can nitpick the "Differences" between the two processor until the cows come home and we can attempt to label those differences as "issues" but they just aren't really issues. Issues are severe problems, taking 20 seconds to POST vs 10 seconds, isn't a severe problem. Do you get what I am saying?
  11. I think you have to put things like this in context. Ryzen has been indeed picky with memory but to solve that, I just dropped in some 2133 memory at the rated spec that was optimized (tested for compatibility) for Ryzen. Zero issues with memory. As far as long post times, the average user isn't going to notice or care that it takes 20 seconds instead of 10 seconds to post. My point is, these "Issues" are ONLY relevant to an extreme enthusiast in most case. It is kind of like saying that the 9900k is better at gaming in a specific title because it can hit 200 fps in a game vs the 3900x only being about to hit 190 fps. It might be true that it is indeed technically better but only someone concerned with extreme min-maxing is going to notice or even care about the 10 fps different in this game. These aren't issues. Issues are things having huge security vulnerabilities and the fixes for those vulnerabilities often decreasing overall performance of the processor (cough...intel...cough, cough).
  12. Not if your talking high refresh 1080p. Even a 2080 Ti won't get you 144 fps on games like RDR2 and Metro: Exodus.
  13. It all depends on cost. If someone is selling you the 1080 Ti for $50-$100, then sure. If you have to pay $500 for the 1080 Ti used, then I think your better off just buying a 2070 Super or sticking with your 1080. If your thinking of paying retail for a 1080 Ti, don't bother because I haven't seen one for under $700 anywhere and in this case, upgrading to a 2080 Super would make sense.
  14. I don't necessarily buy and not use the PC but I do often buy features that I don't ever end up using. For example, I usually buy components for their capability to be overclocked but then find myself not actually overclocking anything. I bought a x570 MB for the PCI 4.0 capability but don't have anything PCI 4.0 compliant that I am adding to the system. I bought a AIO cooler for my new build, but probably won't ever OC the CPU to take advantage of the cooler temps. I got the MB that supported Wifi but always intend to have it wired. Basically I often buy just to have the capability "just in case" I might want to take advantage of it so theoretically, there is quite a bit of money wasted. On the other hand, it sure is nice when I actually find a reason to want those capabilities.
  15. I am still waiting on my pre-order to reach me but I don't think you can beat the Li Lian Lancool 2 right now. $90 cost with the features of a $150 case at least. Has all the filters you need and from reviews is exceptionally easy to build in. Gamer's Nexus kind of criticized the thermals on the case but since they only test with stock fans, I think the thermal performance is under represented. It has room to mount a total of 8 120mm fans so with the addition of a couple of fans, I don't think there will be any issues with airflow and thermals. All other reviewers have had nothing but the highest praise for the case.
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