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sowon

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  • Content Count

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  1. Funny
  2. Funny
  3. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Eschew in wireless gamin mouse   
    But the G502 isn't wireless? At least, not the G502 Lightspeed, that thing is $150, and an additional $100 if you order the Logitech PowerPlay mat along with it.
     
    The ergonomics - or lack thereof depending on who you ask - take a while to adjust to if you don't use a palm grip and/or have small hands and fingers. I used to use a Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum (second revision with RGB and black accents) and because I'm a palm-gripper with 19x9cm hands, it was fairly easy for me.
  4. Funny
  5. Agree
    sowon reacted to LAwLz in Once labelled Gaming addiction as mental disorder, WHO now recommends playing games amid coronavirus outbreak   
    What a dishonest and clickbait headline.
    What the WHO is saying is, stay at home if you can and keep calm. Maybe play some video games or read a book.
    But don't spend copious amounts of time playing games to the point where it gets in the way of more important things.
     
     
    If you don't understand the difference between "play some game for fun" and "I play games to the point where it's harmful behavior" then you might actually have a problem. WHO is saying the former is good, but the latter is bad. It shouldn't be a hard concept to grasp.
     
     
     
    Also, the advice given during a pandemic is not the same as the advice given out during "normal days". Staying at home 24/7 is not typically recommended either, but it is during a pandemic. So there is nothing hypocritical about giving different advice at different times and situations.
     
     
     
    "Hurr durr WHO says I should eat food but when I eat 5 chocolate cakes and 2 family sized pizzas for breakfast during a famine they all of a sudden say I shouldn't do it. What a bunch of hypocrites!".
  6. Funny
    sowon reacted to lewdicrous in Once labelled Gaming addiction as mental disorder, WHO now recommends playing games amid coronavirus outbreak   
    That reverse UNO card is doing a lot of heavy lifting..
  7. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Tristerin in AMD's most important product ever - Ryzen 9 4900HS   
    That feel when wasn't necessarily too interested in this video until I noticed Dave Lee had covered the Asus Zephyrus G14 in his newest video, and mentions AMD in his thumbnail.
     
    Thanks D2D for actually giving me an indication as to what the product truly is.
     

  8. Agree
    sowon got a reaction from jojo75191 in AMD's most important product ever - Ryzen 9 4900HS   
    That feel when wasn't necessarily too interested in this video until I noticed Dave Lee had covered the Asus Zephyrus G14 in his newest video, and mentions AMD in his thumbnail.
     
    Thanks D2D for actually giving me an indication as to what the product truly is.
     

  9. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Eschew in AMD's most important product ever - Ryzen 9 4900HS   
    That feel when wasn't necessarily too interested in this video until I noticed Dave Lee had covered the Asus Zephyrus G14 in his newest video, and mentions AMD in his thumbnail.
     
    Thanks D2D for actually giving me an indication as to what the product truly is.
     

  10. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Pascal... in Valve Steam Controller - Slice of Valve History   
    The Steam Controller is a now-discontinued game controller produced by Valve, the makers behind the gaming platform, Steam. The Steam Controller was released November 2015 and was built as a piece of Valve hardware designed for Steam’s built-in Big Picture mode for games that are suitable for use with a controller, but also designed for desktop use, as the right ‘joystick’ which I will now refer to as a joypad can actually be used as a cursor, which is something that caught me by surprise when I first got my hands on the Steam controller.
     

     
    Unfortunately for the Steam Controller, it was discontinued November 2019 and sold off at a flamingly-low price. I personally bought mine for £4 the day after it was announced that it would be discontinued. It was promptly delivered six days later in an original, sealed Valve Steam Controller box.
    I’ve been using my Steam Controller on and off since receiving it, playing games such as Rocket League, Euro Truck Simulator, and Grand Theft Auto V, and here’s what I think of it.
     

     
    The design of the Steam Controller is quite unique, it follows the same design cues as traditional gamepads, moreso close to an Xbox One’s controller, it has a rounded silhouette, the handles are pointed inwards rather than outwards contrary to a traditional gamepad, but I find the inward curve just as comfortable as the outward curve. It does force a change of grip, but this grip ensures your hands are ergonomically curved whilst holding the controller.
    The controller can be used wirelessly by plugging in a USB-A dongle into your PC to connect. The controller does require two AA batteries to use in wireless configuration, which can be inserted via removing the back panel.

    It can also be used through plugging in a micro-USB cable into the upper back of the controller just like any other traditional gamepad.
    The button layout is unique, and was easily the hardest part of the Steam Controller learning curve to grasp.

    Upper-left is a giant, circular directional pad, or D-pad, it has a huge footprint with equally large areas to press for each direction. The D-pad is also highly tactile, each keypress takes a good amount of force and it certainly lets you know when you’ve pressed it with its huge click.
     Upper-right is essentially mirrored from the upper-left D-pad, only this time it has no embossing and is completely smooth. This is because this D-pad can be used for desktop usage as well as right D-pad.
     


    The lower-left is a standard left thumbstick, and the lower-left is a standard ABXY configuration, which is standard to an Xbox One controller. There are also back and menu buttons that flank the center Steam button which can be used to trigger Steam Big Picture mode whilst in-game.
    Lastly, there are also the standard trigger and bumper buttons found in the back shoulders of the controller.
     
    All in all, it’s a pretty standard shape with a familiar face, but with unique upper D-pads. The different D-pads were polarising to get used to, especially since there was frequent haptic feedback in the right D-pad when used.
     

     
    The controller feels fairly familiar, apart from the glaringly-obvious giant, circular directional pads. While playing Rocket League, the new D-pads took a few games to get used to, but not as difficult as the ABXY buttons which were moved down, compared to a traditional controller like a PlayStation DualShock 4.
     
    The migration of the buttons into a lower-third position was undoubtedly the most difficult part of getting accustomed to the controller, it felt unnatural to have my right thumb so low to reach those buttons especially in games like Rocket League which I played extensively, which relies on the usage of the ABXY buttons for a large portion of the game.
    The whole controller felt nicely-constructed, the buttons were all greatly tactile to press, the D-pads were unique but a nice alternative to the standard positioning of each of those D-pads, and the thumbstick is decently-weighted and made of a hard rubberized plastic which is durable.
     
    The haptic feedback that I mentioned as a unique part of the controller was fairly nice to feel. It wasn’t aggressive enough that I felt uncomfortable, but I would’ve rather the haptics were a bit more prominent as the vibrations as the haptics are the best part of the controller.
     

     
    I still could not for the life of me get used to the ABXY button position. I’d very much rather take a traditional controller layout and have the ABXY buttons in the upper-right as it feels much more comfortable.
     

     
    Used as a traditional gamepad controller for games that are suitable with a controller, it’s decent enough. There are mapping changes to the controller that are available through Steam’s Big Picture mode, but I didn’t find myself needing to use those, so for the most part, I’m a regular controller regular, and that is how I treated my usage of the Steam Controller.
     
    The ABXY button placement is the real deal breaker for me using the controller full-time. Having been used to other traditional controllers such as the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation DualShock 4, and even the Nintendo Switch’s joycon controllers, the placement of the ABXY buttons is shockingly hard to get used to.
     
    I will stick to my other controllers for gaming, but this piece of history will be a nice decoration in my room.
  11. Like
    sowon got a reaction from LukeSavenije in Valve Steam Controller - Slice of Valve History   
    The Steam Controller is a now-discontinued game controller produced by Valve, the makers behind the gaming platform, Steam. The Steam Controller was released November 2015 and was built as a piece of Valve hardware designed for Steam’s built-in Big Picture mode for games that are suitable for use with a controller, but also designed for desktop use, as the right ‘joystick’ which I will now refer to as a joypad can actually be used as a cursor, which is something that caught me by surprise when I first got my hands on the Steam controller.
     

     
    Unfortunately for the Steam Controller, it was discontinued November 2019 and sold off at a flamingly-low price. I personally bought mine for £4 the day after it was announced that it would be discontinued. It was promptly delivered six days later in an original, sealed Valve Steam Controller box.
    I’ve been using my Steam Controller on and off since receiving it, playing games such as Rocket League, Euro Truck Simulator, and Grand Theft Auto V, and here’s what I think of it.
     

     
    The design of the Steam Controller is quite unique, it follows the same design cues as traditional gamepads, moreso close to an Xbox One’s controller, it has a rounded silhouette, the handles are pointed inwards rather than outwards contrary to a traditional gamepad, but I find the inward curve just as comfortable as the outward curve. It does force a change of grip, but this grip ensures your hands are ergonomically curved whilst holding the controller.
    The controller can be used wirelessly by plugging in a USB-A dongle into your PC to connect. The controller does require two AA batteries to use in wireless configuration, which can be inserted via removing the back panel.

    It can also be used through plugging in a micro-USB cable into the upper back of the controller just like any other traditional gamepad.
    The button layout is unique, and was easily the hardest part of the Steam Controller learning curve to grasp.

    Upper-left is a giant, circular directional pad, or D-pad, it has a huge footprint with equally large areas to press for each direction. The D-pad is also highly tactile, each keypress takes a good amount of force and it certainly lets you know when you’ve pressed it with its huge click.
     Upper-right is essentially mirrored from the upper-left D-pad, only this time it has no embossing and is completely smooth. This is because this D-pad can be used for desktop usage as well as right D-pad.
     


    The lower-left is a standard left thumbstick, and the lower-left is a standard ABXY configuration, which is standard to an Xbox One controller. There are also back and menu buttons that flank the center Steam button which can be used to trigger Steam Big Picture mode whilst in-game.
    Lastly, there are also the standard trigger and bumper buttons found in the back shoulders of the controller.
     
    All in all, it’s a pretty standard shape with a familiar face, but with unique upper D-pads. The different D-pads were polarising to get used to, especially since there was frequent haptic feedback in the right D-pad when used.
     

     
    The controller feels fairly familiar, apart from the glaringly-obvious giant, circular directional pads. While playing Rocket League, the new D-pads took a few games to get used to, but not as difficult as the ABXY buttons which were moved down, compared to a traditional controller like a PlayStation DualShock 4.
     
    The migration of the buttons into a lower-third position was undoubtedly the most difficult part of getting accustomed to the controller, it felt unnatural to have my right thumb so low to reach those buttons especially in games like Rocket League which I played extensively, which relies on the usage of the ABXY buttons for a large portion of the game.
    The whole controller felt nicely-constructed, the buttons were all greatly tactile to press, the D-pads were unique but a nice alternative to the standard positioning of each of those D-pads, and the thumbstick is decently-weighted and made of a hard rubberized plastic which is durable.
     
    The haptic feedback that I mentioned as a unique part of the controller was fairly nice to feel. It wasn’t aggressive enough that I felt uncomfortable, but I would’ve rather the haptics were a bit more prominent as the vibrations as the haptics are the best part of the controller.
     

     
    I still could not for the life of me get used to the ABXY button position. I’d very much rather take a traditional controller layout and have the ABXY buttons in the upper-right as it feels much more comfortable.
     

     
    Used as a traditional gamepad controller for games that are suitable with a controller, it’s decent enough. There are mapping changes to the controller that are available through Steam’s Big Picture mode, but I didn’t find myself needing to use those, so for the most part, I’m a regular controller regular, and that is how I treated my usage of the Steam Controller.
     
    The ABXY button placement is the real deal breaker for me using the controller full-time. Having been used to other traditional controllers such as the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation DualShock 4, and even the Nintendo Switch’s joycon controllers, the placement of the ABXY buttons is shockingly hard to get used to.
     
    I will stick to my other controllers for gaming, but this piece of history will be a nice decoration in my room.
  12. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Eschew in Valve Steam Controller - Slice of Valve History   
    The Steam Controller is a now-discontinued game controller produced by Valve, the makers behind the gaming platform, Steam. The Steam Controller was released November 2015 and was built as a piece of Valve hardware designed for Steam’s built-in Big Picture mode for games that are suitable for use with a controller, but also designed for desktop use, as the right ‘joystick’ which I will now refer to as a joypad can actually be used as a cursor, which is something that caught me by surprise when I first got my hands on the Steam controller.
     

     
    Unfortunately for the Steam Controller, it was discontinued November 2019 and sold off at a flamingly-low price. I personally bought mine for £4 the day after it was announced that it would be discontinued. It was promptly delivered six days later in an original, sealed Valve Steam Controller box.
    I’ve been using my Steam Controller on and off since receiving it, playing games such as Rocket League, Euro Truck Simulator, and Grand Theft Auto V, and here’s what I think of it.
     

     
    The design of the Steam Controller is quite unique, it follows the same design cues as traditional gamepads, moreso close to an Xbox One’s controller, it has a rounded silhouette, the handles are pointed inwards rather than outwards contrary to a traditional gamepad, but I find the inward curve just as comfortable as the outward curve. It does force a change of grip, but this grip ensures your hands are ergonomically curved whilst holding the controller.
    The controller can be used wirelessly by plugging in a USB-A dongle into your PC to connect. The controller does require two AA batteries to use in wireless configuration, which can be inserted via removing the back panel.

    It can also be used through plugging in a micro-USB cable into the upper back of the controller just like any other traditional gamepad.
    The button layout is unique, and was easily the hardest part of the Steam Controller learning curve to grasp.

    Upper-left is a giant, circular directional pad, or D-pad, it has a huge footprint with equally large areas to press for each direction. The D-pad is also highly tactile, each keypress takes a good amount of force and it certainly lets you know when you’ve pressed it with its huge click.
     Upper-right is essentially mirrored from the upper-left D-pad, only this time it has no embossing and is completely smooth. This is because this D-pad can be used for desktop usage as well as right D-pad.
     


    The lower-left is a standard left thumbstick, and the lower-left is a standard ABXY configuration, which is standard to an Xbox One controller. There are also back and menu buttons that flank the center Steam button which can be used to trigger Steam Big Picture mode whilst in-game.
    Lastly, there are also the standard trigger and bumper buttons found in the back shoulders of the controller.
     
    All in all, it’s a pretty standard shape with a familiar face, but with unique upper D-pads. The different D-pads were polarising to get used to, especially since there was frequent haptic feedback in the right D-pad when used.
     

     
    The controller feels fairly familiar, apart from the glaringly-obvious giant, circular directional pads. While playing Rocket League, the new D-pads took a few games to get used to, but not as difficult as the ABXY buttons which were moved down, compared to a traditional controller like a PlayStation DualShock 4.
     
    The migration of the buttons into a lower-third position was undoubtedly the most difficult part of getting accustomed to the controller, it felt unnatural to have my right thumb so low to reach those buttons especially in games like Rocket League which I played extensively, which relies on the usage of the ABXY buttons for a large portion of the game.
    The whole controller felt nicely-constructed, the buttons were all greatly tactile to press, the D-pads were unique but a nice alternative to the standard positioning of each of those D-pads, and the thumbstick is decently-weighted and made of a hard rubberized plastic which is durable.
     
    The haptic feedback that I mentioned as a unique part of the controller was fairly nice to feel. It wasn’t aggressive enough that I felt uncomfortable, but I would’ve rather the haptics were a bit more prominent as the vibrations as the haptics are the best part of the controller.
     

     
    I still could not for the life of me get used to the ABXY button position. I’d very much rather take a traditional controller layout and have the ABXY buttons in the upper-right as it feels much more comfortable.
     

     
    Used as a traditional gamepad controller for games that are suitable with a controller, it’s decent enough. There are mapping changes to the controller that are available through Steam’s Big Picture mode, but I didn’t find myself needing to use those, so for the most part, I’m a regular controller regular, and that is how I treated my usage of the Steam Controller.
     
    The ABXY button placement is the real deal breaker for me using the controller full-time. Having been used to other traditional controllers such as the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation DualShock 4, and even the Nintendo Switch’s joycon controllers, the placement of the ABXY buttons is shockingly hard to get used to.
     
    I will stick to my other controllers for gaming, but this piece of history will be a nice decoration in my room.
  13. Informative
    sowon got a reaction from minibois in Need Help with Choosing Parts for my Custom 60 Percent Keyboard   
    You could pick up a GK61 kit for less than $100 off banggood or AliExpress, and supply your own switches and keycaps. A GK61 kit comes with:
    Hotswap PCB Case - it comes in wood, aluminium, or plastic Aluminium plate Plate-mount stabilisers Removable USB-C port + USB-C cable I formerly used to have a GK61 with a wooden case and had bought it for $60. I originally put in Kailh Box Jades into it which costed me $30, and put on an Akko keyset for $40.
    The total cost for my GK61 costed me $130, plus shipping.
     
    The cons of choosing a GK61 kit is that the plate and PCB are proprietary so you won't be able to to get an aftermarket case or plate for example, so you'll be stuck with what you get out of the box. The software is also mildly difficult to navigate unless you can fluently read Chinese.
     
    It might be difficult to make a keyboard for around $200, fully-custom. Off the top of my head, at least using KBDfans, I believe you might be able to get around that by doing the following setup:
    PCB - DZ60RGB-ANSI (KBDfans) - $55 Plate - CNC Aluminum Plate (KBDfans) - $18 Stabs - Cherry PCB-Mount Stabs (KDBfans) - $18 Keycaps - PBT XDA (KBDfans) - $50 Keyswitches - 70x Gateron Ink Yellows (KBDfans) - $52.5 for 70 Case - Plastic Case - $14.90 The total bill for the above comes to $208.40, plus shipping.
  14. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Kelpie in Here's How YOU Can Help Find a Cure for COVID-19!   
    It's only just because we COVID-19 folders are completing WUs faster than they can be made!  Testament to the efforts of the people around the world.
    More people means faster completions, even if it means some of us like you and I don't get any new WUs.
  15. Like
    sowon got a reaction from geo3 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    The Verge covered Taeha Types and his rise into the mechanical keyboard scene! Awesome bit of exposure for Nathan.
     
     
  16. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Eschew in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    The Verge covered Taeha Types and his rise into the mechanical keyboard scene! Awesome bit of exposure for Nathan.
     
     
  17. Like
    sowon got a reaction from noxdeouroboros in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    The Verge covered Taeha Types and his rise into the mechanical keyboard scene! Awesome bit of exposure for Nathan.
     
     
  18. Informative
    sowon got a reaction from Kaloob in Google I/O Officially Cancelled   
    Source: Google I/O
     
    Google has officially announced through their Google I/O website, that the annual event is no longer going ahead, citing that the decision was made after local Bay Area counties - in which Google is headquartered in Mountain View, California - ordered residents to stay at home.
     
    Google have re-assured us by advising that their attention is solely on the safety of others who were originally going to attend the event, as well as advising that they were working on alternative methods to get their highly-anticipated annual event done this year.
     
     
    It comes as no surprise to me, as Google I/O is an in-person event that is held every year in May, it would have been a serious healthcare concern to the audience and the people involved at Google to have held it when the schedule meets the event. I trust that Google will find a way to showcase their new and upcoming hardware and/or software, as I'm sure many are still interested.
     
    In the FAQ section of their Google I/O website, Google has put the nail in the coffin for Google I/O this year:
     
     
    Extremely saddening news, but out of the interest of health and safety of the Google team, Google aren't the bad guys, and I'm sure we can trust them to find other ways of showcasing their new gadgets and gizmos this year.
  19. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Ithanul in Here's How YOU Can Help Find a Cure for COVID-19!   
    It's only just because we COVID-19 folders are completing WUs faster than they can be made!  Testament to the efforts of the people around the world.
    More people means faster completions, even if it means some of us like you and I don't get any new WUs.
  20. Like
    sowon got a reaction from Eschew in Here's How YOU Can Help Find a Cure for COVID-19!   
    It's only just because we COVID-19 folders are completing WUs faster than they can be made!  Testament to the efforts of the people around the world.
    More people means faster completions, even if it means some of us like you and I don't get any new WUs.
  21. Like
    sowon got a reaction from jrazorman in Here's How YOU Can Help Find a Cure for COVID-19!   
    It's only just because we COVID-19 folders are completing WUs faster than they can be made!  Testament to the efforts of the people around the world.
    More people means faster completions, even if it means some of us like you and I don't get any new WUs.
  22. Like
    sowon reacted to jakkuh_t in Here's How YOU Can Help Find a Cure for COVID-19!   
    We show you how you can setup Folding@Home, a distributed computation project that allows you to donate your computer's processing power to help model protein dynamics to combat diseases like Parkinsons, Cancer, Huntingtons, and most importantly, COVID-19.
     
     
    LTT Folding Team's Event Info: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1164541-ltt-folding-teams-emergency-response-to-covid-19/
    LTT Folding Team Number: 223518
    Get a Folding@Home Passkey: https://apps.foldingathome.org/getpasskey
     
     
  23. Agree
    sowon got a reaction from TechyBen in Gamestop claims they are essential retail and are staying open during lockdown   
    I'm not sure I'd call CEX the UK-equivalent, we literally have a franchise called 'GAME' which I would say is more appropriate. Game are doing well for themselves in physical and online forms, at least. I can't confirm, but I believe the Game stores around my area are remaining open until Boris Johnson and his conservatives officially decide to have a say in what we should do instead of having their tails between their legs and giving us sweet nothings. But I digress.
  24. Like
    sowon got a reaction from ShrimpBrime in Thoughts on zeal Pink Rosélios / Sakurios Mechanical Switches   
    I've used them extensively and they're fine switches. I find them a bit on the mushy side, but their smoothness is akin to one of the smoothest alongside Tealios.
    The springs are on the light side and there's a slight ping at stock, but other than that, it's a great switch as long as you can swallow the cost per switch.
     
    I actually made a review on this particular switch here on the forums, you can read it here:
     
     
  25. Informative
    sowon got a reaction from Doobeedoo in Google I/O Officially Cancelled   
    Source: Google I/O
     
    Google has officially announced through their Google I/O website, that the annual event is no longer going ahead, citing that the decision was made after local Bay Area counties - in which Google is headquartered in Mountain View, California - ordered residents to stay at home.
     
    Google have re-assured us by advising that their attention is solely on the safety of others who were originally going to attend the event, as well as advising that they were working on alternative methods to get their highly-anticipated annual event done this year.
     
     
    It comes as no surprise to me, as Google I/O is an in-person event that is held every year in May, it would have been a serious healthcare concern to the audience and the people involved at Google to have held it when the schedule meets the event. I trust that Google will find a way to showcase their new and upcoming hardware and/or software, as I'm sure many are still interested.
     
    In the FAQ section of their Google I/O website, Google has put the nail in the coffin for Google I/O this year:
     
     
    Extremely saddening news, but out of the interest of health and safety of the Google team, Google aren't the bad guys, and I'm sure we can trust them to find other ways of showcasing their new gadgets and gizmos this year.
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