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cerulean

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About cerulean

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  1. If you wait for the next gen stuff, then when that comes out it becomes a question of 'wait for CPU x and GPU y' then keeps going on and on. Unless the release date is like a few weeks away then it's always your best bet to go with the best hardware available now unless you already have a solid system that can do the job for you.
  2. If they drop the over the top rediculousness and put in some proper rad support, that would be nice
  3. I would really wait for BF4 to stop being so buggy overall before trying to pin the drops down to the 6300.
  4. I don't think the ram is all that bad, the middle fan does nothing substancial and I'm not sure about the fans or LED's IMO the Asus Direct CU2 and Gigabyte Windforce are much better designed coolers and I'ld go one of them over a Lightning.
  5. Real hair is the way to go Also a little handy tip, but if you find yourself going through a ton of canned air then maybe look at investing in an air compressor, I have a big one in my shed for painting with, but also brought a tiny compressor for about $50 just to blow dust off of computers with and in the long run will save you a ton
  6. I do a fair amount of sleeving and custom cables for client builds so I'll answer what I can Usually I order about 150 feet worth of sleeving when I do a PSU, that leaves about 20-30 or so feet of extra which I then use to make extensions and sell off. As for material, paracord is awesome, cheap, looks nice and is really very easy to work with. the only real issue is that any brand of white paracord you get will leak colour, but seeing as you aren't using white this wont be an issue for you (EDIT- it also looks nowhere near as good as MDPC or Teleios) I have done alot of work with MDPC sleeving and it looks nothing short of outstanding, but recently I've made the switch over to Teleios sleeving which is also available at Lutro0's store and it is a step up from MDPC, not by much, but it still does look better. As for method, go with whatever you think looks best, I personally love the heatshrinkless look and do suggest that to my clients as much as I can, Keep in mind though that on Lutro0's site he actually sells heatshrink thats designed to be used for heatshrinkless sleeving and wont stick to the sleeve as much as the regular stuff, so order some of that if you can, then a few peices of regular heatshrink to do your sata power with as the regular stuff looks better when you leave it on A fully modular PSU is also the best way to go by far, dealing with a non modular PSU is a pain to say the least. Apart from that everything you have posted looks fine and you seem to have a decent grasp of it all. Just remember that it's going to take a great deal of patience the first time doing a sleeving job and don't expect to be able to pull it off first shot and have it perfect, it's much easier to make heatshrinkless look nice, but it still takes a little while to get your head around it, so be prepared to have to redo cables here and there. Also be prepared to cut yourself when depinning, My hands were shreaded when I did my first PSU and every other sleever I know has done the same. If you have any other questions feel free to drop me a personal message more than happy to help!
  7. I wouldn't ever want to use passive the way ambients fluctuate around where I live. But your right on that. My point was that the only case where air cooling is going to be more silent than water is when your using the most effective heatsink possible with the most silent fans out there on their lowest rpm's, as soon as you ramp those rpm up at all then a watercooling loop will have an advantage because it's a more effecient cooling method and wont need the same increases in fan speed to keep temps in check
  8. Depends on your fans and radspace really But 99 percent of the time it's going to be quieter. It's only in cases where your running a stock clocked i5/i7 under a D14 and you can get away with running both fans at their minimum rpm when water cooling has no benefit over air.
  9. That's weird, I've never noticed that before. But I do use Aida for my temp testing and that only shows the 4 cores
  10. I'm pretty sure core 0,1/2,3/4,5 and then 6,7 are each module, so it could also be possible that each core shows 2 temps because hyperthreading appears to the OS as 2 cores, because they are the same core the OS see's 2 cores running at the same temp?
  11. Because the tubing would be rediculous to deal with when you take the side panel off. You would have your inlet and outlet tubing as well as all your fan cables hanging between the case and the side panel every time you take it off.
  12. Hyperthreading is 2 front ends of the CPU feeding one physical core, so it could be possible that the temp probes are in the seperate front ends? It's something I've always wondered about too when doing i7 rigs
  13. It's fairly normal to have varying temps under idle and load, but not by that much at idle. Most of the time having one core that runs hot indicates a bad mount on the cooler, Try taking it off, redoing your thermal paste and remounting it
  14. When I do my client builds I always go 3x120mm for a CPU only loop + 120mm for each GPU, That way you can have silent fans (1200/1300rpm premium brands) and still have great performance First post too :3
  15. Guess whos back, back again..... ;)

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