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awesomegamer919

Member
  • Content Count

    579
  • Joined

  • Last visited

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2 Followers

About awesomegamer919

  • Title
    Member
  • Birthday September 23

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    'Straya
  • Interests
    Power supplies, PC building in general, C#
  • Biography
    Just some Aussie nerd
  • Occupation
    /r/Buildapc nerd

System

  • CPU
    i7-7700K@5GHz 1.4V
  • Motherboard
    ASUS Prime Z270-AR
  • RAM
    4x8GB Corsair LPX 3000MHz@3200MHz 16-18-18-36
  • GPU
    ASUS GTX 1080 Turbo@2000MHz
  • Case
    Corsair Spec-03 Red, drive cage is removed to install the 240mm CLC
  • Storage
    Samsung 750 EVO 500GB, WD Green 2TB
  • PSU
    Thermaltake SMART Power 750p (CWT PUQ-B rebrand)
  • Display(s)
    108" Projector/Acer X34 + 2x ViewSonic VA2719-2K-SMHD
  • Cooling
    CoolerMaster Seidon 240p w/ 2 extra fans
  • Keyboard
    Razer Blackwidow 2013
  • Mouse
    Razer oroboros
  • Sound
    BlueAnt Pump Zone/AUDEZE LCD2 + IFI Micro iDac 2 + Blue Yeti
  • Operating System
    Win10 EDU
  • PCPartPicker URL

Recent Profile Visitors

996 profile views
  1. All HXis come with at least 2 cables so that’s not a major issue, you can also just run it in SR mode. Yes and no, you *should* hit general OPP at about the same time assuming a similar design (say RMx 2018 and Whisper M) which is not affected by OCP, on units that do have SR 12V OCP then yes you are correct.
  2. Let me give you a quick rundown of Multi-rail vs single rail, both have their advantages and disadvantages, though they tend to do more good than not nowadays. Single rail is fairly straight forward, there is a chip inside the PSUs that monitors how much power is being supplied at once over all rails, if a certain threshold is reached (on a 1000w it’ll be around 1250-1400w) then the PSU automatically shuts down. A few single rail PSUs have a dedicated pin for the 12V which is a little more strict than the general overpower protection, but it’s uncommon. Multi-rail, despite the name, still only has 1 physical 12V rail (there used to be true dual rail units but they haven’t been around in over half a decade), what differentiates it from single rail is that the chip that monitors the output power/current is more advanced and can measure multiple output wires at once, this means it can set much stricter over current protection levels (usually 25-40A instead of the 100A or so on a single rail PSU). This obviously means that it can detect overdraw on a single cable much quicker, potentially stopping a cable from melting, but in the past badly designed “rails” has caused issues with GPUs and CPUs being stuck on the same rail and causing overcurrent protection trips even under normal load (Most, but not all, Multi rail PSUs will have 2-4 rails split between the PCIe cables, CPU cable, ATX cable and SATA/MOLEX cables). This issue has mostly disappeared in recent times, though AMD Vega cards may cause issue with a few PSUs such as 550w Bitfenix Formula or, to a lesser and more user fixable extent, the Bitfenix Whisper 550M. Some units, such as Corsairs -I series (RMi, HXi, AXi) have adjustable multi-rail so you can give rails different amounts of max power before they shit down, or switch to single-rail completely. Overall, Multi-Rail is safer, but slightly more restrictive on GPU choice, single rail is less safe but works well with any GPU and configurable Multi-rail is the best of both worlds.
  3. I really have no horse in this race, but I would like to point a couple things out. Intel’s new DSG 1.4.2 requires 70% efficiency at 2% load, this is *very* difficult to do on mainline units so there will be a trend towards efficiency peaks at lower loads. For example, here’s the new Corsair RM850 (not RMx/I): https://cybenetics.com/d/cybenetics_din.pdf As you can see, the efficiency peaks at around 250w or so which is 30% of load. The old myth that 50% is maximum efficiency hasn’t been relevant for a while due to LLC topologies creating a much flatter efficiency curve and now is going away entirely due to the new DSG 1.4.2 requirements.
  4. Link? Both Corsairs site and Aris claim its a sleeve.
  5. CXm usually has a sleeve bearing. Some newer ones do have rifle bearings, but not all of them.
  6. I seem to remember seeing you complain about a certain Corsair unit's caps,. and that unit had plenty of other small issues...
  7. I know how it works, just thought it was of some amusement... And it does have some use in homelabs where you may not be able to power high end server UPSs or have backup generators. Regardless of it's practicality it's a neat concept
  8. That requires an external battery though, Delta has a unit with a 1m "lifespan" even without a separate battery, uses GaN MODFETs as well (Though it's not ATX form factor): https://www.transphormusa.com/en/news/delta_electronics_800w_server_power_supply/
  9. I disagree, I'd take 3 years of, say, EVGA or Corsair warranty over 5 years of ASUS warranty. It has never factored in before and IMO should not now, if 7 years was a minumum for T2 then TXm and Formula would be T3 which is a gross misrepresentation. Except that puts it with inferior PSUs just because of warranty, motherboards and GPUs have short warranties, why have issues with PSUs that have short warranties as well. Regardless, the Pure Power 11 is being refreshed soon with a switch to gold and 5 years warranty, so it'll be a moot point. CX uses a very different design utilizing a modern half bridge LLC resonant conversion topology, I agree that it doesn't belong in T2, but it's also above T3, IMHO T3 should become T4 (and T4 become T5 etc), and new T3 should be units like the CX non-M, Pure Power 10 etc... If not, it belongs more in T2 than T3, esp since the CXm was only T3 because of the fan... I disagree, either go as I stated above or leave CX in T2, it does not belong among units like the Masterwatt and CXm...
  10. If you are going to have the Leadex in the top tier then the CWT GPU variants (RMx, Whisper M, DQ-m) should also be there. Same with HX(i), RMi and AXi (low wattage and 1600w)
  11. Google docs *do* work, but not when you list every damn model, it gets WAY too long far too quickly.
  12. 230V only spits not useable in NA anyways We've been over this Rn it's not great, but it's often a fairly decent deal. Just keep an eye on https://pcpartpicker.com/products/power-supply/#e=4&sort=price&page=1
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