Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

edward30

Member
  • Content Count

    150
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Awards


This user doesn't have any awards

About edward30

  • Title
    Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I use and recommend Fedora. Fedora is a development area for Red Hat Linux, which is a paid professional Linux distro. Quite new packages, but not so new that an upgrade command will bork your machine. Lots of software. My opinion of a few others: Arch often gets in the way of getting stuff done. People who use Arch spend a lot of time on Arch itself. Fixing it, messing with it. If you use a computer to mess around with your OS, this is a viable choice. Gentoo and Slackware are in the Arch category, only more so. If you want the ultimate Linux geek "one up" cred get the LFS docs. Linux fanboy cred seems based on time wasted, and you can certainly waste a lot of time with all of these. Debian is great for servers if you don't need new packages, but quite tiresome on desktop. Old software, often problems with newer hardware -- skip. Mint is a DE (display environment), Cinnamon, and you're better off installing Cinnamon elsewhere. Ubuntu is a good choice. But if you jump in now you'll learn the Unity DE, and that is going away. In all seriousness just get Fedora and call it a day.
  2. If you have trouble with ordinary textbooks, I strongly encourage you to pick up a copy of Head First Programming. You can find it on Amazon. This book is made for you, and others, who don't do well with dry text. Not only should you be able to read it, but it will work as somewhat of a gateway, both to other Head First books, which are written in the same style, and to progressively dryer, more technical books. Seriously, pick it up.
  3. If you don't have the attention span for books, you're going to be severely limited as a programmer. Reading and understanding code is a key skill for a programmer. I would work on not being able to "learn from books", rather than trying to find a way around it.
  4. You just need a text editor and a web browser. Have a look at Sublime Text and Firefox Developer Edition.
  5. The best IDE depends on what language you're using. But for my work, I enjoy *nix. https://sanctum.geek.nz/arabesque/unix-as-ide-introduction/ Maybe it will work for you also?
  6. Build a Portfolio. Don't just learn, either at school or by yourself, but build things that show prospective employers what you know. Do you have a GitHub account? If not, get one. Consider contributing to open source projects. Walking the walk is the best proof any employer could get.
  7. If the sale would be a waste of time, because of the low resale price, I'll just hang onto them. I might find need for them in the future. Or at least have them to give to friends and family who need them. Thanks all.
  8. I recently bought a few retail copies of Windows 10 Home. I've used these keys, but I don't want Windows any more. The keys have been deleted from my machines. I'd like to sell the keys and the physical media, which are USB drives. Can I do this? What problems might I have?
  9. If you're interested in programming exercises, as the title of this thread would suggest, check out www.leetcode.com. Sorry if this has been mentioned already.
  10. Just be aware that shorter isn't always better. Fewer characters does not necessarily mean something is faster. And remember readability. Even if your code is just for yourself, try to think about your work as if you were writing it for someone else to read. When you come back to it in a years time or more, with no memory of your implementation, you yourself will be that "someone else".
  11. It's just that we've all seen this over and over again on different venues. The socket puppet supporter is the calling card of the young (and the argumentative) on forums. Maybe you aren't the same character. But, again, we've seen this all before.
  12. It seems to me highly likely that you are. Your first post (ever) and every post since had been supportive and defensive of the other account.
  13. @Evellence You probably should replace my math.h with cmath, and sqrt with std::sqrt as @Dat Guy said. I noticed the problem also asked for a version in procedural style. To do that, just eliminate the class syntax, and make calc (or whatever you rename it), a global function like main. You should probably bring m into calc rather than make it global. TBH I found your instructor's instructions rather lackluster, though that may just be the translation.
  14. Obviously. Your joke detector must be broken.
×