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seagate_surfer

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About seagate_surfer

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  1. Running Hard Drive Label UP

    As long as the drive is completely horizontal, or completely vertical, you should be in good shape. Never on a tilt and never mess with the orientation while the drive is running. See: Knowledge Base article.
  2. If you're looking to increase performance a touch, but the cost of SSD is making you a little uneasy, particularly where capacity is also a priority for you, then another solution which could be a fit is an in-between, like an SSHD, or Solid-State Hybrid Drive (current Seagate branding: FireCuda). These drives have an SSD cache on which the drive intuitively places your most frequently accessed data for faster load-time performance, then also has a larger spinning storage capacity for the rest of your data. Also comes with a 5 year warranty, one of the only ways to get that without springing for enterprise/"Pro" level gear. You did mention you don't really game, however the following charts may help you build a picture of how the drives stack up nonetheless: The first one compares startup times across several popular games on a traditional spinning 7200 RPM HDD, our SSHD, and an M.2 SSD (128GB). The white is for SSD, the orange is for FireCuda, and the gray is for the 7200 spinning HDD. Startup Times The next one compares the first 3 days of gaming storage utilization across several popular titles, and SYSmark ratings from various drive types and combinations. First of the grays is 7200 RPM 1TB spinning HDD, second (lightest gray) is FireCuda, third (darkest gray) is an SSD + 7200 RPM HDD combo, purple is SSD + FireCuda combo, and lastly blue is SSD. First 3 Days Gaming Storage Utilization Good luck, regardless of which route you decide to go in the end.
  3. Ultra slow hard drive after installing games.

    Sorry to hear you're having trouble with your BarraCuda. Make sure and grab our free diagnostic software SeaTools to scan the drive for errors. Here is the link to our Warranty Validation Tool just to make sure you have it for getting RMA sorted out. If you run into any trouble, feel free to get in touch with Seagate Support directly.
  4. Optane + SSD to destroy HDD

    The fact of the matter is that, at the end of the day, the hungry beast of data storage demand is growing exponentially. While nobody denies the performance advantages to SSD and their place, it is going to take a variety of storage mediums as well as ever-increasing innovation to keep up with the explosive growth. Check out the Data Age 2025 Report with IDC for more info. Somethin gives the vibe that the world isn't going to find a way to fit 163 zettabytes all on solid-state. That's zettabytes with a z.
  5. Petabyte Storage

    What about zettabyte? World is getting data-hungry! Data Age 2025 Report
  6. Petabyte Storage

    Just gonna leave this here... CES 2018: Seagate Announces 1PB High-density Enclosure
  7. What cpu do U guys have

    Personal rig at home has the ol' Devil's Canyon (i7-4790K) in it.
  8. Quirky HDD Behaviour

    Backup your data first and foremost. Once that's done and out of the way, you can download our free diagnostic tool SeaTools to test the health of the drive. If you would like to dig into any potential warranty info, you can check it using our Warranty Validation Tool.
  9. RAID in SSHDs and HDDs

    The differences between IronWolf and FireCuda relate to what we've already discussed above. It does relate to some of the physical hardware on the drives, but also to the firmware which tells the drive what exactly it is going to be used for and which use-case fits best. While the article is a couple of years old, Storage Review did some interesting digging on what makes desktop drives different from NAS drives, you may be interested in looking through that: http://www.storagereview.com/pick_the_right_drive_for_the_job_24_7_nas_hdds_vs_desktop_hdds You can also find our YouTube video on choosing the right drive for the right job here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JORAaU95YZ8 Once you get into enterprise-level stuff like Exos, you start thinking more expensive equipment, controllers that require a different connection type from SATA called SAS, more complex internal components, considerations for a lot more massive vibration, heat, etc. Basically it's an entirely different world and the hard drives have to be built differently, with more complex firmware to deal with that world.
  10. RAID in SSHDs and HDDs

    Only other thing would be maybe going with some kind of SAS solution, there are certain drives built for enterprise RAID with NAND cache, Exos 10E2400 comes to mind, it has 16GB NAND cache, but then you get into the whole SAS and enterprise level equipment dealio, probably a lot more intense and costly than you want to go as it's usually secure databasing type stuff.
  11. RAID in SSHDs and HDDs

    You probably won't see a performance bump using SSHD's in RAID over regular HDDs, because the firmware doesn't know how to "stack" the SSD cache portion of the drives this way. Your best bet would probably be to go with hard drives rated for NAS (current Seagate branding: IronWolf). The IronWolf has firmware engineered with RAID in mind (AgileArray), with features such as vibration controls and error correction controls which boost longevity and performance when used in RAID. Standard desktop drives don't have vibration sensing nor specialized RAID firmware.
  12. Raid?

    Depends on what your goal is. A common misconception about RAID is that it prevents you from losing data. RAID is not a backup. RAID is meant to prevent your system from going down in the event of a drive failure or needing to replace a drive. It is ideal for a scenario where taking down the system to fix whatever is going on is not ideal/is unacceptable. For example: A server running transactions for your website. Time is money and every second that is down equals money lost. If your goal is to protect yourself from losing your data, then your best bet is the 3-2-1 backup strategy, which generally is considered one of the best ways to protect your data. Keep 3 copies of your data, on 2 different mediums, with 1 kept offsite to prevent against disaster. A good external drive backup is often a good part of this strategy. It's not to say that RAID is bad or doesn't have it's uses, it's just that it doesn't do what people think it does when they want to protect their data.
  13. Raid 5 and 6 HELP! got a question

    You don't want to have your SSDs and HDDs in the same RAID. Think of it like a potato sack race. The "team" (RAID) is only as fast/capable as the slowest individual member of the team (the slowest drive). So you'd be losing all of the performance capabilities because the RAID would perform at the level of the slowest HDD in the RAID. Another idea could be doing two separate RAID arrays, one for your 4 SSDs and another, separate one for your HDDs. Also, for RAID 6, you need a minimum of 4 HDDs. Here is a useful interactive RAID Calculator from a popular NAS vendor, Synology. I've found it useful to tinker with when trying to plan/conceptualize different RAID levels. In addition to telling you how many disks you need for a particular type of RAID, it also tells you exactly how much of the total space will be your usable capacity versus redundancy. Ignore the SHR categories in the drop-down, those are specific to Synology enclosures.
  14. Is an HDD still worth it (For games?

    For gaming use, most types of games don't rely heavily on the load-time performance improvements in SSDs, so a lot of people will have a small SSD for their operating system plus maybe a few more frequently used applications, then a larger HDD for their games/general storage. The exception is if you're into open-world type gaming, then you'd also see quicker loading of new map areas as you moved into them. The in-between solution would be an SSHD, or Solid-State Hybrid Drive (current Seagate branding: FireCuda) which utilizes an SSD cache for your most frequently accessed data, along with a much larger spinning storage capacity so that you still get bang-for-your-buck capacity. We have a couple of charts to help you get a better feel for all of this: The first one compares startup times across several popular games on a traditional spinning 7200 RPM HDD, our SSHD, and an M.2 SSD (128GB). The white is for SSD, the orange is for our SSHD, and the gray is for the 7200 spinning HDD. Startup Times The next one compares the first 3 days of gaming storage utilization across several popular titles, and SYSmark ratings from various drive types and combinations. First of the grays is 7200 RPM 1TB spinning HDD, second (lightest gray) is our SSHD, third (darkest gray) is an SSD + 7200 RPM HDD combo, purple is SSD + our SSHD combo, and lastly blue is SSD. First 3 Days Gaming Storage Utilization
  15. RMA Hdd and new & refurbished

    As far as Seagate goes, you can find our policy on the Limited Warranty support page on our website.
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