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porina

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  1. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Arika S in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    This thread is about some random rumour that Intel dropped 4.0 from a consumer desktop CPU. No one forgot there are real use cases of PCIe 4.0 and even 5.0, just that isn't what is being discussed here.
     
     
    I'll still welcome anyone with a link to Intel saying they ever had plans to put 4.0 in anyway, for it to possible be a thing for them to allegedly take it away.
  2. Agree
    porina reacted to leadeater in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    On the desktop side I would have liked to see, at the PCIe 3.0 generation, a move away from x16 slots for GPUs or at least switched the slot to x8 in favor of other devices being able to directly connect to the CPU. So few run two GPUs it makes less sense to me to have two x16 physical slots that switch to x8/x8 when both are populated over instead utilizing those 8 lanes for dual x4 NVMe or NVMe + 10Gbe.
     
    If we have all accepted dual GPUs are dead (god damn it I refuse) then stop designing boards around x8/x8 PCIe expansion slots, that's 8 lanes that are wasted and that will be true of PCIe 4.0. Just have 1 PCIe expansion slot connected to the CPU and the rest chipset, we don't actually need more lanes we just need to stop them from being needlessly wasted.
  3. Like
    porina got a reaction from Kalm_Traveler in Your personal rig CPU history thread - let's reminisce   
    Starts 1993...
    *486 DX2 66 MHz
    *Pentium MMX 120 MHz
    *Pentium 2 266@450 MHz
    *2x Celeron 366@550 MHz on Abit BP6
    Assorted Athlons up to T-bird 1200 MHz
    *P4 Northwood 1.8 GHz
    Dual Xeon 2.4 @ 3.2 GHz
    Athlon 64 X2
    *Core 2 Duo E6600, later replaced by Q6600
    Athlon X6 @ 3.5 GHz
    *i7-2600k
    i5-4570S
    *2015 i7-6700k
    *i7-8086k (current main gaming system)
     
    In the above, ones marked with * were main systems. I had other systems at the same time which were usually dedicated to crunching. I don't have anything older than the 4570S, although I have since got more E6600's.
     
    While not main systems, I have a bunch of other CPUs, running or not, including:
    Ryzen 3600, 3700X, 2600, 1700
    Intel HEDT: 5820k, 5930k, 7940X
    Xeons: E5-2650, E5-2667, E5-2683v3
    Consumer: 8350k, 7350k, 6700T, 6600k, 6100, 5775C, 5675C, 2x4790, 2x4150T, some older stuff too...
     
  4. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Deli in Fake it till they make it: 'Improved' AMD Wraith Prism coolers with extra heatpipes are counterfeits   
    As owner of a genuine Wraith Prism, I'm wondering why anyone would want it. Was not very good at cooling, very noisy on my 3700X (stock). RGB looks nice. Might be ok for lower TDP CPUs than they are actually bundled with. I don't think the limit of its performance is the number of heatpipes though, especially as the added pair on the edge probably wont get much heat conduction to them. More a problem for airflow and overall surface area, so my gut feel is the copy wont be that much different at equivalent airflow.
  5. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Dabombinable in Intel drops PCIe 4.0 support for Comet Lake Desktop   
    It's more useful to look at usable lanes, where AM4 gives the user 20, compared to Intel's 16.
     
    What use case do you have where this really makes a difference? That's not saying there isn't a difference, but where it really matters? When I got Optane, I did try connecting it on CPU and chipset lanes (on Intel platform) and there was a small detectable difference in benchmarks. Real world use, you'd never notice it.
     
     
     
    So back to the original claim of this thread, anyone got a credible reference where Intel said they were doing PCIe 4.0 on the next desktop platform? Maybe I just missed it, but I don't recall ever hearing that.
     
    Also the hardware differences between PCIe 3.0 and 4.0 may be overblown. We have AMD as the example for that. Have people already forgotten they also dropped 4.0 support... on older chipsets. It was working, but they were concerned about some edge cases where it might not be reliable and they killed support for it. Those older boards would not have had 4.0 in mind when they were made, but many would have worked if AMD hadn't pulled the plug. My understanding from that was that it wasn't so much you had to add more stuff to make 4.0 work, but that you had to make design considerations to ensure it worked. Signal integrity required more care.
     
  6. Agree
    porina reacted to Jurrunio in Intel Pentium G4400 Skylake + 8GB DDR4 3000MHz   
    With Z chipset board you can run it full speed, otherwise you're limited to 2133MHz
  7. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Fasauceome in Can I put 16gb ram in H81M-P33?   
    It will help with the bandwidth but doesn't change the speed. For example, you have a car with 4 people in it travelling at 60mph. If you have a 2nd car also with 4 people in it at the same speed, you have 8 people at 60 mph, not 4 people at 120mph. Still, the effect is, you have more total bandwidth which can help.
     
    It'll probably be ok but things are never 100% when it comes to ram compatibility.
  8. Agree
    porina got a reaction from -rascal- in PSA: AsRock Motherboard + Crucial RAM Compatibility Issue Fix   
    1.35v is typical for that speed, and should be set by the mobo if you select the XMP option. If not, and you only manually selected the speed, maybe it would remain at the lower standard voltage. I haven't had this problem with my Asrock B450 Gaming-ITX/ac with a variety of ram. I don't have Crucial at that particular speed though.
     
    Note if you're doing a bios update, don't do it when it is in a potentially unstable state in case it gets corrupted during write. In that scenario, I'd reduce the ram speed to 2133 first as that should be very safe at the lower voltage.
     
    I think it is worth upgrading the bios if you're not on latest, particularly if you're running a Zen 2 CPU as the updates since launch have significantly improved ram compatibility especially at higher speeds.
  9. Like
    porina got a reaction from WaggishOhio383 in PSA: AsRock Motherboard + Crucial RAM Compatibility Issue Fix   
    1.35v is typical for that speed, and should be set by the mobo if you select the XMP option. If not, and you only manually selected the speed, maybe it would remain at the lower standard voltage. I haven't had this problem with my Asrock B450 Gaming-ITX/ac with a variety of ram. I don't have Crucial at that particular speed though.
     
    Note if you're doing a bios update, don't do it when it is in a potentially unstable state in case it gets corrupted during write. In that scenario, I'd reduce the ram speed to 2133 first as that should be very safe at the lower voltage.
     
    I think it is worth upgrading the bios if you're not on latest, particularly if you're running a Zen 2 CPU as the updates since launch have significantly improved ram compatibility especially at higher speeds.
  10. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Mister Woof in Is It Worth Upgrading to 2 x DDR3 8GB or just keep the 1x DDR3 8GB? My motherboard can’t take DDR4 so is it worth getting dual channel of my 8GB or no   
    I'd suggest running monitoring software to see what the actual system load is when gaming. That might give a clue as to what might help or not. This is one occasion where having an AMD GPU makes it easier since it has a built in overlay, and with nvidia either you need a 3rd party tool, hope the game has it built in, or run separate tools on a 2nd monitor.
     
    How this is done doesn't matter, but go into the game. If the CPU usage is 100% and the GPU usage is lower, you're CPU limited. Ram might or might not help here, as more ram bandwidth could free up more of the CPU's potential. If the GPU is 100% and CPU is lower, more ram probably wont help. If ram usage is close to 8GB, just get the extra ram. Especially with a 6GB video card, you could run out of vram depending on game settings and that would spill over to the system ram.
     
    I still think, if the ram is cheap enough, it wouldn't hurt to get it. 
  11. Agree
    porina reacted to Mira Yurizaki in (rant) Ryzen is good but some people need to stop...   
    A major problem I see with tech forums is they don't have any empathy. That is, they think their use case is the only use case and therefore, you're wrong if you don't line up with their use case. They try to steer people towards how they would want to tackle the system rather than work with what OP wants. I mean, there are times and places for that, but it seems like few people know when to actually do that.
     
    People's use cases and experiences are their own and only their own. The sooner others understand this, the better off we'll all be.
  12. Informative
    porina got a reaction from ImNotNeko in (rant) Ryzen is good but some people need to stop...   
    I am curious what you run, since AVX-512 software seems rather scarce still. I only run Prime95-like software routinely, and y-cruncher for competitive overclocking fun.
     
    You can't say AMD can do it except they don't have it... I'm only aware of two companies making AVX-512 enabled CPUs, and AMD is not one of them. One is Intel, the other is... I forgot the name, some obscure offshoot from Via. Don't expect to see the latter in consumer circles any time soon.
     
    If the workload allows, you might be able to brute force that deficit by literally throwing more cores at it. Also note that AVX-512 is a large group of instructions. Different use cases may see different levels of acceleration from using it.
     
    It is included in Ice Lake and will also be included in more (consumer) CPUs going forward.
     
    Only if you don't care about AVX-512 or ram bandwidth. Those are some pretty major differences. I don't know the OP's use case, but the CCX segmentation can also be a pretty big roadblock compared to monolithic CPUs.
  13. Informative
    porina got a reaction from GoldenLag in (rant) Ryzen is good but some people need to stop...   
    I am curious what you run, since AVX-512 software seems rather scarce still. I only run Prime95-like software routinely, and y-cruncher for competitive overclocking fun.
     
    You can't say AMD can do it except they don't have it... I'm only aware of two companies making AVX-512 enabled CPUs, and AMD is not one of them. One is Intel, the other is... I forgot the name, some obscure offshoot from Via. Don't expect to see the latter in consumer circles any time soon.
     
    If the workload allows, you might be able to brute force that deficit by literally throwing more cores at it. Also note that AVX-512 is a large group of instructions. Different use cases may see different levels of acceleration from using it.
     
    It is included in Ice Lake and will also be included in more (consumer) CPUs going forward.
     
    Only if you don't care about AVX-512 or ram bandwidth. Those are some pretty major differences. I don't know the OP's use case, but the CCX segmentation can also be a pretty big roadblock compared to monolithic CPUs.
  14. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Levent in How can someone with a Cert IV in IT get their foot in the door for a job with no experience?   
    Apply anyway. You might get lucky. I don't know what the certificate you mention is, but it might help. If there are a lot of adverts for these jobs, maybe there's enough to go around.
  15. Like
    porina got a reaction from TechyBen in WordpADS - Microsoft trials ads in Wordpad.   
    They did this in the past. My old Sony Vaio laptop (way back when Sony still owned Vaio brand) had exactly that. A "free" version of Office you can use but there were ads in the display area.
     
    I rarely use it, but it does come in handy if you're helping out someone else's system, and you don't or can't install other stuff on it. The main use is for opening file types not supported by Notepad, and can also be used to convert text files to PC format in case they're in the Linux/Unix format. Some variation of CR/LF makes it practically unreadable if not done.
  16. Agree
    porina got a reaction from Mira Yurizaki in NVIDIA GeForce 3070/3080/3080 Ti (Ampere): More VRAM, Way Faster, & Cheaper! (Update 5 ~ Alleged GDC / March Reveal & Specs)   
    It is interesting to these kind of comparisons, but keep in mind that 10 series has been out far longer than 20 series and not everyone upgrades every generation. In that sense, it isn't looking bad. For perspective, it might be more interesting to see what kinda market share high(er) end AMD GPUs are taking in comparison. navi is probably too new to make a dent, and the VII was a rather niche card. That doesn't really leave a lot does it? Maybe Vega 56+64 would be a comparison point but they were impacted by the mining era...
     
    It is hard to do like for like comparisons between different generations. Maybe if you compare launch+1 year numbers for each it could be interesting? Turing has been out for over a year so this kinda comparison could be possible.
     
    If I have some time later I might try to do something along the above lines.
  17. Agree
    porina got a reaction from VegetableStu in NVIDIA GeForce 3070/3080/3080 Ti (Ampere): More VRAM, Way Faster, & Cheaper! (Update 5 ~ Alleged GDC / March Reveal & Specs)   
    Pricing will adjust to performance, with the bias for now that Intel and nvidia can generally charge more for the same performance than AMD due to better market recognition. We're seeing a shift in Intel, but AMD has to provide a competitive flagship GPU if we're going to see any significant downward price movement from nvidia.
  18. Like
    porina got a reaction from GoldenLag in Will intel release more 10980XE?   
    The main difference is VNNI instructions added to AVX-512 with the 10 series. Older ones have AVX-512 without that.
  19. Informative
    porina got a reaction from Kitsan in Skylake X Users   
    They will destroy all AMD CPUs before Zen 2 if you have FP64 heavy workloads supporting AVX-512, in my case that is for prime number finding using software that works similarly to Prime95. Zen 2 is only kinda competitive because they have more cores for the money. Zen 2 is comparable to consumer Intel CPUs (per core) and earlier Ryzen is about Sandy Bridge level in this use case.
  20. Like
    porina got a reaction from bomerr in Skylake X Users   
    They will destroy all AMD CPUs before Zen 2 if you have FP64 heavy workloads supporting AVX-512, in my case that is for prime number finding using software that works similarly to Prime95. Zen 2 is only kinda competitive because they have more cores for the money. Zen 2 is comparable to consumer Intel CPUs (per core) and earlier Ryzen is about Sandy Bridge level in this use case.
  21. Like
    porina got a reaction from ZWELINHTET in FullHD or 4K "Web conferencing" with low latency?   
    I'm not up to speed with how Zoom works but with multiple participants I guess point to point between all isn't realistic and it goes through a central server? So best you can hope to do is get that server latency down.
  22. Like
    porina got a reaction from Zando Bob in How do you even cool this thing - i9-10990XE + 10th gen i3/i5 spotted   
    HFT is a real thing, and people make money off it, is it a scam? Basically it is no worse than the higher risk financial activities people do. Speed is everything. More slower cores is just slower. Believe systems are typically water cooled, no more extreme than that. Keep in mind these are big dies, the thermal density nowhere near as bad as Zen 2. In the old days people would try to get their computers as physically close to the exchange as possible to reduce the connection distance. Now, exchanges can provide on site facilities, but they make sure the cable runs are equal length to all sections so no one gets an advantage that way. They still have to play somewhat competitively against others trying the same.
  23. Like
    porina got a reaction from TechyBen in How do you even cool this thing - i9-10990XE + 10th gen i3/i5 spotted   
    HFT crowd will be all over it. It's looks like a natural successor to the 9990XE. AMD have nothing in this area, which is extremely niche.
    https://www.anandtech.com/show/14980/the-intel-core-i9-9990xe-review
     
  24. Funny
    porina got a reaction from captain_to_fire in Less power for more bandwidth - Micron on DDR5 production @ CES 2020   
    Personally this can't come soon enough mainly for the bandwidth, more so than power or capacity. Note these are the defined speeds. I'm sure we'll get overclocking modules over 9000 soon enough.
     
    With PCIe 5, coming May 5, on 5nm. Don't ask which year. 
  25. Funny
    porina got a reaction from GDRRiley in Less power for more bandwidth - Micron on DDR5 production @ CES 2020   
    Personally this can't come soon enough mainly for the bandwidth, more so than power or capacity. Note these are the defined speeds. I'm sure we'll get overclocking modules over 9000 soon enough.
     
    With PCIe 5, coming May 5, on 5nm. Don't ask which year. 
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