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Taf the Ghost

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About Taf the Ghost

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  1. Taf the Ghost

    VR/Unity Build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant Type Item Price CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor Purchased For $0.00 Motherboard MSI - B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $139.99 @ Amazon Storage Crucial - P1 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $89.99 @ Adorama Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB Black Video Card $699.99 @ SuperBiiz Case Thermaltake - View 22 Tempered Glass Edition ATX Mid Tower Case $49.89 @ Amazon Power Supply Corsair - CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Amazon Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts Total $1154.84 Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-08 19:04 EST-0500 If you can scavenge some spindle drives from another computer and/or find things a few bucks cheaper at another website... there's a 2080 Build.
  2. Taf the Ghost

    VR/Unity Build

    Functionally the same. For VR, it wouldn't surprise me if the 1080 was better some of the wonkiness. If you can get a used 1080 for reasonable, or especially a 1080 Ti, that'd probably be best.
  3. Taf the Ghost

    VR/Unity Build

    Design programs are notorious memory hogs, the reason for the 32 Gb suggestion. For any testing, you want as much GPU as possible. Problem is you'd have to compromise a lot of the rest of the system to improve the GPU all that much. It might be possible to squeeze a 2070 into the build. VR/Development stuff. VR is hard to run and in a development environment, running dual GPUs might cause more problems than it'd solve.
  4. Taf the Ghost

    VR/Unity Build

    It strikes me you'd want a lot more GPU, but you only have so much budget to work with.
  5. Taf the Ghost

    VR/Unity Build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant Type Item Price CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor Purchased For $0.00 Motherboard MSI - B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $249.99 @ Amazon Storage Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $117.99 @ B&H Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $58.89 @ OutletPC Video Card EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB FTW ULTRA SILENT GAMING Video Card $459.99 @ Amazon Case NZXT - H500i (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $97.04 @ B&H Power Supply Corsair - CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Amazon Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts Total $1158.88 Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-08 18:22 EST-0500 You can OC the 2700 on the included cooler, or add a separate one. I had set these things to Amazon only, but the display in the thread doesn't want to show that.
  6. Taf the Ghost

    VR/Unity Build

    So you have CPU & Peripherals, but you have 1230USD left to spend, correct?
  7. Taf the Ghost

    Budget content creation PC

    It's always safe to assume the Internet isn't helpful, until you run into a place that is.
  8. Taf the Ghost

    Budget content creation PC

    What type of monitor do you have?
  9. Taf the Ghost

    Budget content creation PC

    At least 6 cores, 16 Gb of memory, 256 Gb good SSD as the primary and some extra storage. 1050 Ti/1060 is all that's needed for GPU acceleration tasks. Rest is down to how much budget you have.
  10. Taf the Ghost

    Lyft and Uber file for IPOs, one day apart

    VCs want their money before they all collapse.
  11. Taf the Ghost

    Ryzen 3000 Leaks

    Given just the amount of packaging going into Rome, they'd have a huge supply of Zen2 dies already, but the testing cycle was always going to be pretty long for this type of product. Though I think the main take away from this cycle is that, unlike Zen1, AMD isn't rushing. They're making good money & margin on Zen products, so they can let those keep rolling until they drop the big bomb in Intel's lap.
  12. Taf the Ghost

    Ryzen 3000 Leaks

    AMD most likely had the first test silicon for 7nm Zen2 and Vega 20 in December 2017. That's part of why they can go Server First on this node jump. Main thing is the motherboards, especially the PCIe 4.0 ones, won't be ready until further into 2019. It's going to be a design jump for the motherboard manufacturers, so they can't just redo a lot of previous designs. AMD probably could have launched Zen2 Desktop for Holiday 2018 if they had been really pressed to get something out. However, they aren't. As a subtle note, generally products don't make public roadmaps until they've got at least some test silicon back. I wonder how many actually functioning Icelake-SP dies Intel has actually gotten back. Must not be a lot.
  13. @Stefan Payne Manufacturers will generally produce to the spec they think they can sell. We have a 40+ year history, in computers, of low-quality PSUs. We lacked a spec sheet for the PSU and while Great Wall can make up & down the range of quality, we already had a system with lowest-cost possible parts in key areas. The only sign, from the outside, that it wasn't trash-tier was the fact it was actually branded. Which is why the PSU turning out to be better than expected is more of a sign of how good PSU quality, at the most basic, has gotten rather than the SI knowing how to choose parts properly.
  14. Kyle (Bitwit) was able to solve most of the problems with the case for what should have been about 20 bucks in production costs. They wouldn't have even needed hot glue, as a result. An SI that is making that many mistakes on a product running 1400-2100USD gets no benefit of the doubt. The fact GN had to use rather expensive electrical testing equipment just to find out that the PSU wasn't trash tier ends this discussion.
  15. Well, the SI cheaped out on the motherboard really hard, didn't make sure the GPU power cable was properly attached in at least several shipments, hot glued a Type-C to the motherboard and didn't make sure there was enough air flow to make the front 3 fans do anything useful. A no-spec sheet, generic, bare metal PSU should logically be assumed to be "too cheap" for the system. It's not a great PSU, but it's not Tier 7, it seems. Which is actually surprising.
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