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Windows7ge

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Everything posted by Windows7ge

  1. If you have setup a bridged network adapter on the host the VMs will appear to the network as separate machines. They shouldn't interfere with one another if that is your question. a Router OS is one of those things I don't recommend virtualizing. You will have to take the server down for maintenance from time to time and things can go wrong. If this happens it means you'll lose your router which means your whole home will lose internet. You should really use a dedicated box for pfSense. If you use a disk for the host it cannot be passed through to a VM for the purposes of a cache disk. It's either one or the other. Can't have both unless you create a 4th virtual disk and give that to the VM for caching but it'd come with unnecessary overhead. I like PROXMOX but there's also ESXi, HyperV, QEMU/KVM, VirtualBox. Some are more recommendable over others. ZFS pools can only be expanded by appending vdevs. Each vdev requires it's own redundancy. If you create an initial raidz2 with four drives (might as well use RAID10 for more IOPS then) then when you append the next two drives you'd have to use a mirror. Reason is the data would be striped across the vdevs. If you didn't add redundancy to the 2 new disks and one failed all the data in the pool would be lost. When you connect to a local server the router is irrelevant. With a VM server and a bridged network adapter it creates a virtual switch. This will contain a forwarding table which operates at Layer 2. If you specify the IP of the 10Gbit interface it will connect you over that network link. Your bigger concern should be if Windows will use the faster of the two links when using hostnames as it doesn't always. Dedicated box for the router is my recommendation. I wouldn't run FreeNAS in a VM either. Use something like PROXMOX if you want ZFS and a good hypervisor or alternatively Debian(ubuntu/mint/popos/lubuntu/etc)+QEMU/KVM+Virt-manager+zfs-utils.
  2. I don't use PLEX myself but from what I've heard for single streams it prefers higher core clocks over more cores. If you only have one user a quad core with a higher clock would probably do you fine. Perhaps something like the LGA1150 socket. I'm more into more cores over faster cores so I'm not the best person to ask about lower-end server equipment.
  3. If you use Manjaro (based on Arch) I can't help much for tuning QEMU/KVM if you choose to use it. I have a VFIO guide for GPU pass-though on Debian (ubuntu) that would provide most of the instructions you would need to set this up. It doesn't include how to pass-through a drive though. It isn't too difficult. I believe it's doable through the GUI (virt-manager). For your use case a minecraft server isn't a stressful application and most of the latency involved will probably be through your internet connection. Unless you plan to load it up with many many clients it probably won't impact you going either way. Security wise the hypervisor uses what I believe is Ubuntu's SE Linux/AppArmor security application. You may also install UFW and open the ports necessary for Minecraft. Should block everything else. Either way you'll have to create a network bridge as the default is NAT. Without this nobody will be able to connect.
  4. They're both high performance/low overhead hypervisors. ESXi has a free standard license and QEMU/KVM is just outright free from the package manager. I don't have experience with ESXi so I'm not the best person to ask. I do have a lot of experience with QEMU/KVM so I'm a little biased. Informative. I've never heard of it being a supported feature. I will still make the argument though that at least on Windows the performance of VB is terrible compared to ESXi or QEMU/KVM. If he ever needs the Ubuntu server for compute he'll get better performance from it with a lighter weight hypervisor. There's also a number of knobs you can adjust with QEMU/KVM to improve the performance that I don't believe exist on VB.
  5. Personally I'd use Software RAID. Cheaper/easier to expand a pool. Performance isn't an issue even if you went 10Gbit. If you're CLI savvy you can use Ubuntu Server. Most people would recommend FreeNAS if you want ZFS but you can install ZFS on Ubuntu server via the zfs-utils package. The commands aren't hard to use. You should be able to have the disks spin-down via S.M.A.R.T. settings but I've not researched how to do that from CLI. It's usually ill-advised to do this anyways.
  6. If you want to make use of that DDR4 RAM none of these CPU's will work. You need one that will fit any of the following sockets: LGA1151 LGA2011-v3 LGA2066 LGA3647 AM4
  7. Over a 1Gbit network the most you can expect is ~115MB/s. 70MB/s isn't terrible and the speed can be very dependent on the type of files being transferred.
  8. Did you setup a network bridge? Default settings put the VM behind NAT. If you setup a static network configuration based on the host's configuration on the VM without using a Bridged adapter then the VM's configuration will conflict with the virtual router and the VM won't have internet access.
  9. You can do this using QEMU/KVM. VMWare ESXi should be capable of it. Don't know about VMWare for Workstations, and Virtualbox I can say with relative confidence the answer is no.
  10. Since you're not really asking a question or looking for help this would be better suited as a Status Update. You can create these from your Profile Page. Look for the box labeled "Write a public message on your own feed..." If you want to turn it into a build log where you can share the progression of the build/project the forum has a sub-forum for that as well. Instead of going Create -> Topic -> Server and NAS, you'd go Create -> Topic -> Build Logs. I created one of my own some time back where I built a server from scratch: It was quite the undertaking. Still in progress.
  11. If you're just sharing and not asking for help the forum has Status Updates for this. Or if you wanted to turn this into a build log you could. The forum has a section for that as well.
  12. Sounds like your goal is to plug a wireless router into your modem. You can do this. Things will be easier if you can provide model numbers for the hardware you're trying to setup.
  13. It would be very overkill but that's great if you want to play with virtualization. I would estimate that you'd be pulling approx 250w while idle. If that's a cost you wouldn't mind if this runs 24/7 then it's an option.
  14. Yeah, no. Your closest option would be to buy a SFP to RJ-45 transceiver then connect an RJ-45 cable to that.
  15. If this is a fresh Windows install I'd try re-installing with the latest .ISO file from Microsoft. Seeing as how it's working on Linux it isn't a hardware issue.
  16. If you have experience with Ubuntu I would just install zfs-utils if you want ZFS. For off-site backup RSYNC over SSH would be less convoluted and more strait forward. This should be pre-installed on Ubuntu. FreeNAS runs fine in a VM though I wouldn't recommend it as its nesting File Systems. Unless you plan to pass-through an HBA it could potentially have problems. I wouldn't depend on it for backup.
  17. Windows7ge

    Cable modem

    Like any other piece of hardware, failure can occur. This can become apparent from a variety of potential issues including loss of speed, loss of responsiveness, or outright loss of connection. So yes it can happen and loss of speed can be the result of a hardware failure.
  18. Have you verified the modem you're using doesn't have a built-in router?
  19. If you just want to connect remotely for now investigate connecting to the iDRAC utility. This will enable you to remote into the desktop and even the BIOS. For an OS I'd also second using a hypervisor if you just want to learn and explore.
  20. Looking up that MAC address there it belongs to a "LGInnote LG Innotek" product. Have you tried finding the MAC in your Routers client list? See what IP it has and if you can find it? If it's on the Wi-Fi and it's not yours I'd change your Wi-Fi password, restart your computer and router and see if it goes away.
  21. UPnP is about your only option outside of configuring Port Forwarding within the router. It may be possible to VPN or Proxy your way out then use that server to Port Forward but otherwise to my knowledge you're SOL if you can't get into your Router's WebUI. For what reason do you not have access? It may be better to troubleshoot that instead.
  22. Have you tried booting a different OS and running a speed test? Something like Ubuntu?
  23. I don't have your router but it's usually fairly simple. Pick the IP of the server you want to forward requests to. Make sure you've reserved this IP so it doesn't change or get handed out twice. Picking External port numbers You can pick a single port number or a range of port numbers for a single server. These will be the ports the router will accept requests on from the Internet. Picking Internal port numbers. When your router takes in a request on a port you don't always have to use the same numbers on both the WAN and LAN. Depending on the service such as SSH I could have people connect on port 31000 but the router will forward that on port 22 if that's what I set the Internal port(s) to. The responding server does need to be configured to accept requests on said port though. UDP, TCP, or Both This depends on the type of traffic being send/received for the service being employed. Minecraft setup guides should specify which you need.
  24. I wonder if this years BOINC Pentathlon will feature COVID-19. I think it'd be appropriate.
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