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Squirrel724

Member
  • Content Count

    1,038
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About Squirrel724

  • Title
    Veteran

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

System

  • CPU
    Ryzen 9 3900X
  • Motherboard
    MSI MPG x570 Gaming Pro Carbon WiFi
  • RAM
    32GB Corsair LPX DDR4 3600MHz
  • GPU
    Gigabyte 2070 Super Gaming OC 8GB
  • Case
    Fractal Define R6
  • Storage
    500 GB Samsung 970 Evo Pro NVME
    1TB Samsung 860 Evo
    6TB WD Blue
  • PSU
    750W EVGA G3
  • Display(s)
    LG 27MP33hq
  • Cooling
    NZXT Kraken x72
  • Operating System
    WIndows 10

Recent Profile Visitors

1,469 profile views
  1. Twice this week I have booted my PC up to find the pump on my Kraken X72 making quite the racket. It sounds like a hard drive under a heavy load but quite a bit louder. That's the only way I can describe it, like a hard drive clicking. It's not the gurgling you get when there is air in the pump and tilting the system doesn't change the sound. After letting the system run for about 15 minutes the sound goes away and the pump sounds like normal. Thermals are exactly how they have always been with this cooler. As mentioned this has only happened twice so far, first on Monday and then again today. Cooler was bought brand new in mid December 2019 and the radiator is installed vertically in the front of my case. Is this OK behavior or should I be starting the RMA process for this cooler? I'm jumpy because this is my first time with a liquid cooler and its not a cheap CPU that is being cooled. I don't want to have to discover first hand what NZXT's policies and procedures are in regards to CPUs damaged by a failing cooler. The noise also isn't consistent enough that I could be confident that NZXT would be able to reproduce it if I do send it in for RMA. Looking for advice. Is this a quirk of AIO watercooling and perfectly fine or a sign of a failing pump? Is NZXT's service good enough that they would swap it even if they weren't able to reproduce the noise right away? Should I just run it until the noise is constant or worse the pump dies, killing my 3900x and hope that NZXT replaces both of them?
  2. That bottom radiator is massive, how thick is that?
  3. What are you looking to do with the computer? TR4 is already a dead platform with 3rd generation Threadrippers using the TRX40 platform instead. AM4 will be getting the 4000 series Ryzen CPUs before being replaced.
  4. That's Disney's way of keeping people from bypassing region locks using a VPN. There may be VPNs that can trick the login servers but I haven't heard of any and Disney would likely be working to shut that method of access down.
  5. Windows does see both DIMMs but for some reason it has hardware reserved 8.0GB of it (bottom item in the small text). Your issue isn't hardware, there's something in your BIOS or Windows which is reserving that memory.
  6. Until a product makes it to production it's still a prototype. Yes, the roadsters have been shown to the public and have been seen but they are still prototypes and still far from being ready to go to production. If they were actually more than prototypes and display models they would be producing them and selling them so they can make money.
  7. Built into the processor. The Intel Arc / AMD product page for your processor will tell you the fastest speed your processor is officially designed to meet.
  8. The DDR4 specifications include various standards for up to 3200MHz. What 3600+MHz DIMMs mean for you is that the DRAMs and layout of the DIMMs are designed and tested to work at those high frequencies. What you are actually doing when applying an XMP profile to get to your RAM's listed speed of 3600+MHz is overclocking the memory controller to run at speeds higher than the DDR4 standard it was designed for. Take for example my build. I'm running a R9 3900X with Corsair 3600MHz RAM. If you go to AMDs product page for the 3900x you will see that the memory controller in the processor is rated at 3200MHz meaning it is designed to meet the DDR4-3200 PC4-25600 standard, the fastest standard in the DDR4 specification. While Corsair has rated my DIMMs to run at speeds of 3600MHz my memory controller is being overclocked in order to reach those speeds. Where that line for overclocking is moves based on the processor in the system (for example an i9 9900k is only rated to DDR4-2666 PC4-21333) but anything past 3200MHz is an overclock as that's the fastest the standard goes.
  9. Ifixit doesn't factor in the availability of brand new spare parts from the manufacturer because even if spare parts were available when they were new eventually the manufacturer is going to stop making those parts. When talking about repairing devices your #1 source of parts is other broken devices. What iFixit is looking at is how hard is it to disassemble a device into it's individual parts and then put it back together into a working device. If you can do those two things without damaging the device you can keep that device working basically forever.
  10. Because it is physically impossible to make a game on the scale of Mass Effect within a year.
  11. You can only see so much on the visible spectrum. Planets, stars, nebulas, etc. all emit different forms and amounts of radiation on the radio spectum and you can learn a lot by studying this radiation, far more than you could ever hope to learn with an optical telescope. The scientists couldn't care less about looking for alien broadcasts.
  12. You plug the monitor, keyboard, and mouse into the KVM. You then plug the 2 computers into the KVM. It only uses one input on the monitors (in your case the display port input).
  13. Romer-G's implementation of tactility is garbage. The way it just holds and then suddenly gives up just feels awful. The tactility of Cherry Browns is much better and simply provides a nice bump to indicate where the switch activates without causing the switch to collapse after the bump. Cherry Clears are even nicer with more tactility than the browns and after the bump the spring actually gets stiffer, actively preventing you from bottoming out.
  14. Mice use microswitches for their click. Microswitches are often used in industry where they are commonly used to detect when something is at the ends of it's travel. The metal spring plate makes for a larger target on the switch than the little nub in the switch and also allows the switch to be triggered sooner, preventing you from having to crash into the switch itself. If you open up a mouse you will discover they remove the spring plate from the microswitches.
  15. Is NCIX actually dead dead? I thought they were just going through a bankruptcy restructuring.
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