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Johners

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  1. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TechyBen in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    I don't necessarily think Microsoft will move Windows 10 to a service model as they sell plenty of services that sit onto top of Windows such as Office 365 and everything in the enterprise. I assume there's also a chance they eventually bring Xbox Live Gold and Xbox Game Pass to the PC at some point in the future.
     
    As for pushing users to Linux, I really don't see this happening, at all despite people claiming this will happen pretty much since Valve started supporting Linux. In reality, I can see users shifting away from the traditional desktop and laptop systems to devices such as Chromebooks, the iPad (has the keyboard and stylus), the iPad Pro (has the keyboard and stylus) or a MacBook if they've got more money to spend. The issue Linux with Linux is the lack of an actual platform around it, sure you can say ChromeOS or Android is Linux but in reality the platform just relies on Linux as an underlying component that's not exposed to the end user.
  2. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TechyBen in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    I don't necessarily think Microsoft will move Windows 10 to a service model as they sell plenty of services that sit onto top of Windows such as Office 365 and everything in the enterprise. I assume there's also a chance they eventually bring Xbox Live Gold and Xbox Game Pass to the PC at some point in the future.
     
    As for pushing users to Linux, I really don't see this happening, at all despite people claiming this will happen pretty much since Valve started supporting Linux. In reality, I can see users shifting away from the traditional desktop and laptop systems to devices such as Chromebooks, the iPad (has the keyboard and stylus), the iPad Pro (has the keyboard and stylus) or a MacBook if they've got more money to spend. The issue Linux with Linux is the lack of an actual platform around it, sure you can say ChromeOS or Android is Linux but in reality the platform just relies on Linux as an underlying component that's not exposed to the end user.
  3. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from The Benjamins in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    Windows 7, the popular operating system released by Microsoft in 2009, enters it's final year of support.
     
    On January 14th 2020, exactly one year from today, Windows 7 will no longer be receiving free updates and users will have to pay for support or upgrade to a supported version of Windows if they wish to continue receiving updates. To put things into perspective, Windows 7 is still used be around 28% of Steam users according to the December 2018 hardware survey and 19.3% of w3schools users. While these numbers might not be fully representative of all desktops and laptops worldwide, it does show that a lot of users still rely on an operating system which is very close to being unsupported.
    As much as I liked using Windows 7, until Windows 10 was released, I don't want to see a repeat of Windows XP in terms of how users cling onto using an older operating system. I've got my issues with Windows 10, I won't lie, but it's a much better operating system overall. For examples, Windows Updates are smaller and faster, a wider range of login due to Windows Hello (face, fingerprint, PIN), Windows Defender is both free and not annoying. I know some users will be sad that Windows 7 is almost dead due to concerns about owning their PC and forced updates but I highly recommend that you upgrade if you haven't done so already.
     
    Source 1: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/01/windows-7-enters-its-final-year-of-free-support/
    Source 2: https://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey
    Source 3: https://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp
  4. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from The Benjamins in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    Windows 7, the popular operating system released by Microsoft in 2009, enters it's final year of support.
     
    On January 14th 2020, exactly one year from today, Windows 7 will no longer be receiving free updates and users will have to pay for support or upgrade to a supported version of Windows if they wish to continue receiving updates. To put things into perspective, Windows 7 is still used be around 28% of Steam users according to the December 2018 hardware survey and 19.3% of w3schools users. While these numbers might not be fully representative of all desktops and laptops worldwide, it does show that a lot of users still rely on an operating system which is very close to being unsupported.
    As much as I liked using Windows 7, until Windows 10 was released, I don't want to see a repeat of Windows XP in terms of how users cling onto using an older operating system. I've got my issues with Windows 10, I won't lie, but it's a much better operating system overall. For examples, Windows Updates are smaller and faster, a wider range of login due to Windows Hello (face, fingerprint, PIN), Windows Defender is both free and not annoying. I know some users will be sad that Windows 7 is almost dead due to concerns about owning their PC and forced updates but I highly recommend that you upgrade if you haven't done so already.
     
    Source 1: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/01/windows-7-enters-its-final-year-of-free-support/
    Source 2: https://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey
    Source 3: https://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp
  5. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from The Benjamins in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    Windows 7, the popular operating system released by Microsoft in 2009, enters it's final year of support.
     
    On January 14th 2020, exactly one year from today, Windows 7 will no longer be receiving free updates and users will have to pay for support or upgrade to a supported version of Windows if they wish to continue receiving updates. To put things into perspective, Windows 7 is still used be around 28% of Steam users according to the December 2018 hardware survey and 19.3% of w3schools users. While these numbers might not be fully representative of all desktops and laptops worldwide, it does show that a lot of users still rely on an operating system which is very close to being unsupported.
    As much as I liked using Windows 7, until Windows 10 was released, I don't want to see a repeat of Windows XP in terms of how users cling onto using an older operating system. I've got my issues with Windows 10, I won't lie, but it's a much better operating system overall. For examples, Windows Updates are smaller and faster, a wider range of login due to Windows Hello (face, fingerprint, PIN), Windows Defender is both free and not annoying. I know some users will be sad that Windows 7 is almost dead due to concerns about owning their PC and forced updates but I highly recommend that you upgrade if you haven't done so already.
     
    Source 1: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/01/windows-7-enters-its-final-year-of-free-support/
    Source 2: https://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey
    Source 3: https://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp
  6. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from The Benjamins in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    Windows 7, the popular operating system released by Microsoft in 2009, enters it's final year of support.
     
    On January 14th 2020, exactly one year from today, Windows 7 will no longer be receiving free updates and users will have to pay for support or upgrade to a supported version of Windows if they wish to continue receiving updates. To put things into perspective, Windows 7 is still used be around 28% of Steam users according to the December 2018 hardware survey and 19.3% of w3schools users. While these numbers might not be fully representative of all desktops and laptops worldwide, it does show that a lot of users still rely on an operating system which is very close to being unsupported.
    As much as I liked using Windows 7, until Windows 10 was released, I don't want to see a repeat of Windows XP in terms of how users cling onto using an older operating system. I've got my issues with Windows 10, I won't lie, but it's a much better operating system overall. For examples, Windows Updates are smaller and faster, a wider range of login due to Windows Hello (face, fingerprint, PIN), Windows Defender is both free and not annoying. I know some users will be sad that Windows 7 is almost dead due to concerns about owning their PC and forced updates but I highly recommend that you upgrade if you haven't done so already.
     
    Source 1: https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2019/01/windows-7-enters-its-final-year-of-free-support/
    Source 2: https://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey
    Source 3: https://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp
  7. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TechyBen in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    I don't necessarily think Microsoft will move Windows 10 to a service model as they sell plenty of services that sit onto top of Windows such as Office 365 and everything in the enterprise. I assume there's also a chance they eventually bring Xbox Live Gold and Xbox Game Pass to the PC at some point in the future.
     
    As for pushing users to Linux, I really don't see this happening, at all despite people claiming this will happen pretty much since Valve started supporting Linux. In reality, I can see users shifting away from the traditional desktop and laptop systems to devices such as Chromebooks, the iPad (has the keyboard and stylus), the iPad Pro (has the keyboard and stylus) or a MacBook if they've got more money to spend. The issue Linux with Linux is the lack of an actual platform around it, sure you can say ChromeOS or Android is Linux but in reality the platform just relies on Linux as an underlying component that's not exposed to the end user.
  8. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from valdyrgramr in Windows 7 enters its last year of support   
    Yeah, it did, I've corrected this.
  9. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  10. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  11. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  12. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  13. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  14. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  15. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Tech_Dreamer in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    Office 365 and Windows are made by separate teams within Microsoft though. We get monthly releases to Office 365 but every 6 months for Windows 10. It seem stupid but if you've actually worked in a large organisation with multiple projects and products, you'd understand this.
  16. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft introduces New Office icons   
    You do understand that large companies can have multiple departments and teams that work on different products, right?
  17. Like
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft launches Surface Pro 6, Surface Laptop 2 and Surface Studio 2 and more | What a shame   
    I'm interested in getting a Surface Pro 6 to upgrade from my Surface Pro 4 (i5, 4GB, 128GB) but it's going to hit my wallet a bit. Luckily I can sell my current device, with the pen and typecover, for around £400-450 but the prices are likely to drop now a new generation of the Surface Pro is out.
     
    I'd realisitcally like a Surface Book 2 but it's too expensive (the GPU would also go somewhat unused) and while there's a middle ground with the Surface Laptop, I'm not a fan of the entire keyboard having the alcantara stuff on it.
     

  18. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Konrad_K in Discord are launching their own games store   
    Discord is expanding it's business from being a communication platform for gamers to a platform to buy games. In a post on their blog, Discord have announced a beta version of their store alongside free games with Nitro, a first on Discord programme and a centralised library from all of your installed games.
    A lot of Discord users have suspected something like this would happen for a while now. Outside of selling Nitro subscriptions and user data, they don't currently have a real money maker. I'd personally like to see the Discord platform developed so they can take on Valve and Steam to either get actual improvements to the established leader of PC game distribution or to actually overtake them. The current situation is getting messy as more companies are using their own platforms and launchers, potentially for financial reasons, and Valve aren't doing anything about it. The Steam client sucks and the Store is getting filled with more and more trash.
     
    Source: https://blog.discordapp.com/the-discord-store-beta-9a35596fdd4
  19. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Konrad_K in Discord are launching their own games store   
    Discord is expanding it's business from being a communication platform for gamers to a platform to buy games. In a post on their blog, Discord have announced a beta version of their store alongside free games with Nitro, a first on Discord programme and a centralised library from all of your installed games.
    A lot of Discord users have suspected something like this would happen for a while now. Outside of selling Nitro subscriptions and user data, they don't currently have a real money maker. I'd personally like to see the Discord platform developed so they can take on Valve and Steam to either get actual improvements to the established leader of PC game distribution or to actually overtake them. The current situation is getting messy as more companies are using their own platforms and launchers, potentially for financial reasons, and Valve aren't doing anything about it. The Steam client sucks and the Store is getting filled with more and more trash.
     
    Source: https://blog.discordapp.com/the-discord-store-beta-9a35596fdd4
  20. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Konrad_K in Discord are launching their own games store   
    Discord is expanding it's business from being a communication platform for gamers to a platform to buy games. In a post on their blog, Discord have announced a beta version of their store alongside free games with Nitro, a first on Discord programme and a centralised library from all of your installed games.
    A lot of Discord users have suspected something like this would happen for a while now. Outside of selling Nitro subscriptions and user data, they don't currently have a real money maker. I'd personally like to see the Discord platform developed so they can take on Valve and Steam to either get actual improvements to the established leader of PC game distribution or to actually overtake them. The current situation is getting messy as more companies are using their own platforms and launchers, potentially for financial reasons, and Valve aren't doing anything about it. The Steam client sucks and the Store is getting filled with more and more trash.
     
    Source: https://blog.discordapp.com/the-discord-store-beta-9a35596fdd4
  21. Like
    Johners got a reaction from J.b091 in How To Setup A Torrent Server With Deluge   
    Peer-to-peer file transfer is a great tool for file sharing without the need for having to rely on a dedicated server. Instead you can spread the download among many peers in order to have great redundancy as well as faster transfer speeds. Hosting your own torrent server will allow you to put your files onto a computer that is dedicated to storing and sharing them with others. While this is often used for illegal file sharing, it can also be a legitimate way of sharing files with other people. This tutorial will show you how to setup a torrent server on a dedicated Linux server using the popular torrent client Deluge. The Linux distribution used throughout is Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS.
     
    Step 1 – Adding A Dedicated User
     
    We will start by adding a dedicated user account that the torrent client will run through. To do this we need to open to go to the terminal and type the following command:
    sudo adduser –disabled-password –system –home /var/lib/deluge –gecos “Deluge Server” –group deluge The above command adds a user with no password, a home directory located in /var/lib and adds it to a user group also called deluge. Having no password means the user account cannot be logged into if someone gains access to your server.
     
    Now we need to hand ownership of the log files that Deluge uses to the deluge user in the deluge group. This means the software will have the ability to write to those log files. To do this, run the following commands in the terminal:
    sudo touch /var/log/deluged.logsudo touch /var/log/deluge-web.logsudo chown deluge:deluge /var/log/deluge* Step 2 – Installing Deluge
     
    We are now going to install the Deluge Client onto our server along with the WebUI. By installing the WebUI, we will be able to control our server fully in the future with nothing more than a web browser.
     
    There are two choices for installing the Deluge Client onto the server. The first option is via the packages provided in the Ubuntu repositories. While this may not provide the latest version of the Deluge client, the version installed will be tested and stable.
     
    The second option is via the Deluge PPA. This will provide the latest version of the Deluge client which could include bug fixes, new features and improvements. There is also the chance of new bugs and regressions to appear into the software. The PPA can be added by running this command in the terminal:
    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:deluge-team/ppa The Deluge client can be installed by running the following command in the terminal:
    sudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install deluged deluge-webui Step 3 – Make Deluge Start On System Boot
     
    The Deluge Daemon is the part of the Deluge Client that allows it to run as a background service. A lot of torrent clients have this as it allows us to close the programs but still keep our file sharing running in the background.
     
    We need to enable two daemons, one for the client itself and the other for the WebUI. To enable the first daemon, we need to write an init script that will make it start on boot as well as giving us the ability to start/stop it on demand. To do this, we need to run the following command in the terminal:
    sudo nano /etc/init/deluge.conf Once this is run, paste the following into nano and then save the file by pressing Control + X and then pressing Y to accept the changes:
    # Deluge Client Daemon# Starts On System Bootstart on (filesystem and networking) or runlevel [2345]stop on runlevel [016]env uid=delugeenv gid=delugeenv umask=022exec start-stop-daemon -S -c $uid:$gid -k $umask -x /usr/bin/deluged -- - Now we need to write the init script for the WebUI. To do this, run the following command in the terminal:
    sudo nano /etc/init/deluge-web.conf Once this is run, paste the following into nano and then save the file by pressing Control + X and then pressing Y to accept the changes:
    # Deluge WebUI# Provides a WebUI on# http://IP:8112start on started delugestop on stopping delugeenv uid=delugeenv gid=delugeenv umask=027exec start-stop-daemon -S -c $uid:$gid -k $umask -x /usr/bin/deluge-web We can notice that both scripts include lines that will make the client and the WebUI run under the user and group we created earlier on in the tutorial.
     
    Finally we need to reboot and then test the scripts using the following commands:
    sudo rebootsudo service deluge stopsudo service deluge start Step 4 – Connecting and Configuring Via The WebUI
     
    We are now going to connect to and configure our Deluge client by the WebUI. To do this, go to your web browser and type the following into the address bar. Replace IP with the internal or external IP address of your server.
    http://IP:8112/ When we do this, we will be presented with a web page that looks something like this:
     

     
    In order to log into our server, we need to enter the default password, deluge. Once we do this, we will be prompted to change our password to something more secure which is recommended.
     

     
    We can set anything as our password as long as it is secure. While the WebUI doesn’t provide a password strength utility we can use an online password generator in order to have a strong password. Once the desired password is entered and then press change.
     
    There are a multitude of options we can set within the user interface but we are now going to test our server by adding a torrent to it.
     
    Step 5 – Testing Our Server
     
    We are now going to test our server by downloading something onto it. We can download anything onto our server but for this test we are going to use Ubuntu GNOME. The torrent file can be downloaded here. To add the torrent in the WebUI, click the add button in the top left corner and then a screen that looks like this will appear:
     

     
    This interface allow us to add multiple torrents at the same by either uploading the .torrent file or by adding the URL. As we downloaded the torrent file earlier, we are going to upload it to the server by clicking the File button. The screen that appears looks like this:
     

     
    Press the browser button to locate to the .torrent file on our computers and then click the add button. It will then take us back to the previous menu that will now look like this:
     

     
    The Ubuntu GNOME torrent is now ready to be downloaded on our Deluge Server. Clicking the Add button at the bottom left corner will start the download. As we progress through the download, the WebUI will look something like this:
     

     
    We now have a functional Deluge Server. The options menu can be configured further with downloads being moved automatically to another directory and speeds limits being setup if you are running this on your home internet connection in order to conserve your bandwidth. The extensions also allow us to add a scheduling option in order to add a system that will limit speeds in between certain times.
  22. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TheBritishVillain in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4... Battle Royale !!!   
    Seeing as the game is on Battle.NET, there's a good chance they could be using the Warden anti-cheat system developed by Blizzard which is very, very effective.
  23. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TheBritishVillain in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4... Battle Royale !!!   
    Seeing as the game is on Battle.NET, there's a good chance they could be using the Warden anti-cheat system developed by Blizzard which is very, very effective.
  24. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TheBritishVillain in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4... Battle Royale !!!   
    Seeing as the game is on Battle.NET, there's a good chance they could be using the Warden anti-cheat system developed by Blizzard which is very, very effective.
  25. Like
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in iTunes is now available on the Windows Store   
    I did a clean install of Windows 10 Pro on my desktop yesterday and opted for the version of iTunes from the Microsoft Store. Not having the crappy Apple Software Updater is nice and the program still functions like the non-Store release. One thing I've noticed is that I now get a native system notification every time a new song plays.
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