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Johners

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  1. Like
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Microsoft launches Surface Pro 6, Surface Laptop 2 and Surface Studio 2 and more | What a shame   
    I'm interested in getting a Surface Pro 6 to upgrade from my Surface Pro 4 (i5, 4GB, 128GB) but it's going to hit my wallet a bit. Luckily I can sell my current device, with the pen and typecover, for around £400-450 but the prices are likely to drop now a new generation of the Surface Pro is out.
     
    I'd realisitcally like a Surface Book 2 but it's too expensive (the GPU would also go somewhat unused) and while there's a middle ground with the Surface Laptop, I'm not a fan of the entire keyboard having the alcantara stuff on it.
     

  2. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Konrad_K in Discord are launching their own games store   
    Discord is expanding it's business from being a communication platform for gamers to a platform to buy games. In a post on their blog, Discord have announced a beta version of their store alongside free games with Nitro, a first on Discord programme and a centralised library from all of your installed games.
    A lot of Discord users have suspected something like this would happen for a while now. Outside of selling Nitro subscriptions and user data, they don't currently have a real money maker. I'd personally like to see the Discord platform developed so they can take on Valve and Steam to either get actual improvements to the established leader of PC game distribution or to actually overtake them. The current situation is getting messy as more companies are using their own platforms and launchers, potentially for financial reasons, and Valve aren't doing anything about it. The Steam client sucks and the Store is getting filled with more and more trash.
     
    Source: https://blog.discordapp.com/the-discord-store-beta-9a35596fdd4
  3. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Konrad_K in Discord are launching their own games store   
    Discord is expanding it's business from being a communication platform for gamers to a platform to buy games. In a post on their blog, Discord have announced a beta version of their store alongside free games with Nitro, a first on Discord programme and a centralised library from all of your installed games.
    A lot of Discord users have suspected something like this would happen for a while now. Outside of selling Nitro subscriptions and user data, they don't currently have a real money maker. I'd personally like to see the Discord platform developed so they can take on Valve and Steam to either get actual improvements to the established leader of PC game distribution or to actually overtake them. The current situation is getting messy as more companies are using their own platforms and launchers, potentially for financial reasons, and Valve aren't doing anything about it. The Steam client sucks and the Store is getting filled with more and more trash.
     
    Source: https://blog.discordapp.com/the-discord-store-beta-9a35596fdd4
  4. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Konrad_K in Discord are launching their own games store   
    Discord is expanding it's business from being a communication platform for gamers to a platform to buy games. In a post on their blog, Discord have announced a beta version of their store alongside free games with Nitro, a first on Discord programme and a centralised library from all of your installed games.
    A lot of Discord users have suspected something like this would happen for a while now. Outside of selling Nitro subscriptions and user data, they don't currently have a real money maker. I'd personally like to see the Discord platform developed so they can take on Valve and Steam to either get actual improvements to the established leader of PC game distribution or to actually overtake them. The current situation is getting messy as more companies are using their own platforms and launchers, potentially for financial reasons, and Valve aren't doing anything about it. The Steam client sucks and the Store is getting filled with more and more trash.
     
    Source: https://blog.discordapp.com/the-discord-store-beta-9a35596fdd4
  5. Like
    Johners got a reaction from J.b091 in How To Setup A Torrent Server With Deluge   
    Peer-to-peer file transfer is a great tool for file sharing without the need for having to rely on a dedicated server. Instead you can spread the download among many peers in order to have great redundancy as well as faster transfer speeds. Hosting your own torrent server will allow you to put your files onto a computer that is dedicated to storing and sharing them with others. While this is often used for illegal file sharing, it can also be a legitimate way of sharing files with other people. This tutorial will show you how to setup a torrent server on a dedicated Linux server using the popular torrent client Deluge. The Linux distribution used throughout is Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS.
     
    Step 1 – Adding A Dedicated User
     
    We will start by adding a dedicated user account that the torrent client will run through. To do this we need to open to go to the terminal and type the following command:
    sudo adduser –disabled-password –system –home /var/lib/deluge –gecos “Deluge Server” –group deluge The above command adds a user with no password, a home directory located in /var/lib and adds it to a user group also called deluge. Having no password means the user account cannot be logged into if someone gains access to your server.
     
    Now we need to hand ownership of the log files that Deluge uses to the deluge user in the deluge group. This means the software will have the ability to write to those log files. To do this, run the following commands in the terminal:
    sudo touch /var/log/deluged.logsudo touch /var/log/deluge-web.logsudo chown deluge:deluge /var/log/deluge* Step 2 – Installing Deluge
     
    We are now going to install the Deluge Client onto our server along with the WebUI. By installing the WebUI, we will be able to control our server fully in the future with nothing more than a web browser.
     
    There are two choices for installing the Deluge Client onto the server. The first option is via the packages provided in the Ubuntu repositories. While this may not provide the latest version of the Deluge client, the version installed will be tested and stable.
     
    The second option is via the Deluge PPA. This will provide the latest version of the Deluge client which could include bug fixes, new features and improvements. There is also the chance of new bugs and regressions to appear into the software. The PPA can be added by running this command in the terminal:
    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:deluge-team/ppa The Deluge client can be installed by running the following command in the terminal:
    sudo apt-get updatesudo apt-get install deluged deluge-webui Step 3 – Make Deluge Start On System Boot
     
    The Deluge Daemon is the part of the Deluge Client that allows it to run as a background service. A lot of torrent clients have this as it allows us to close the programs but still keep our file sharing running in the background.
     
    We need to enable two daemons, one for the client itself and the other for the WebUI. To enable the first daemon, we need to write an init script that will make it start on boot as well as giving us the ability to start/stop it on demand. To do this, we need to run the following command in the terminal:
    sudo nano /etc/init/deluge.conf Once this is run, paste the following into nano and then save the file by pressing Control + X and then pressing Y to accept the changes:
    # Deluge Client Daemon# Starts On System Bootstart on (filesystem and networking) or runlevel [2345]stop on runlevel [016]env uid=delugeenv gid=delugeenv umask=022exec start-stop-daemon -S -c $uid:$gid -k $umask -x /usr/bin/deluged -- - Now we need to write the init script for the WebUI. To do this, run the following command in the terminal:
    sudo nano /etc/init/deluge-web.conf Once this is run, paste the following into nano and then save the file by pressing Control + X and then pressing Y to accept the changes:
    # Deluge WebUI# Provides a WebUI on# http://IP:8112start on started delugestop on stopping delugeenv uid=delugeenv gid=delugeenv umask=027exec start-stop-daemon -S -c $uid:$gid -k $umask -x /usr/bin/deluge-web We can notice that both scripts include lines that will make the client and the WebUI run under the user and group we created earlier on in the tutorial.
     
    Finally we need to reboot and then test the scripts using the following commands:
    sudo rebootsudo service deluge stopsudo service deluge start Step 4 – Connecting and Configuring Via The WebUI
     
    We are now going to connect to and configure our Deluge client by the WebUI. To do this, go to your web browser and type the following into the address bar. Replace IP with the internal or external IP address of your server.
    http://IP:8112/ When we do this, we will be presented with a web page that looks something like this:
     

     
    In order to log into our server, we need to enter the default password, deluge. Once we do this, we will be prompted to change our password to something more secure which is recommended.
     

     
    We can set anything as our password as long as it is secure. While the WebUI doesn’t provide a password strength utility we can use an online password generator in order to have a strong password. Once the desired password is entered and then press change.
     
    There are a multitude of options we can set within the user interface but we are now going to test our server by adding a torrent to it.
     
    Step 5 – Testing Our Server
     
    We are now going to test our server by downloading something onto it. We can download anything onto our server but for this test we are going to use Ubuntu GNOME. The torrent file can be downloaded here. To add the torrent in the WebUI, click the add button in the top left corner and then a screen that looks like this will appear:
     

     
    This interface allow us to add multiple torrents at the same by either uploading the .torrent file or by adding the URL. As we downloaded the torrent file earlier, we are going to upload it to the server by clicking the File button. The screen that appears looks like this:
     

     
    Press the browser button to locate to the .torrent file on our computers and then click the add button. It will then take us back to the previous menu that will now look like this:
     

     
    The Ubuntu GNOME torrent is now ready to be downloaded on our Deluge Server. Clicking the Add button at the bottom left corner will start the download. As we progress through the download, the WebUI will look something like this:
     

     
    We now have a functional Deluge Server. The options menu can be configured further with downloads being moved automatically to another directory and speeds limits being setup if you are running this on your home internet connection in order to conserve your bandwidth. The extensions also allow us to add a scheduling option in order to add a system that will limit speeds in between certain times.
  6. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TheBritishVillain in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4... Battle Royale !!!   
    Seeing as the game is on Battle.NET, there's a good chance they could be using the Warden anti-cheat system developed by Blizzard which is very, very effective.
  7. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TheBritishVillain in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4... Battle Royale !!!   
    Seeing as the game is on Battle.NET, there's a good chance they could be using the Warden anti-cheat system developed by Blizzard which is very, very effective.
  8. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from TheBritishVillain in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4... Battle Royale !!!   
    Seeing as the game is on Battle.NET, there's a good chance they could be using the Warden anti-cheat system developed by Blizzard which is very, very effective.
  9. Like
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in iTunes is now available on the Windows Store   
    I did a clean install of Windows 10 Pro on my desktop yesterday and opted for the version of iTunes from the Microsoft Store. Not having the crappy Apple Software Updater is nice and the program still functions like the non-Store release. One thing I've noticed is that I now get a native system notification every time a new song plays.
  10. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from ARikozuM in Fortnite Publisher suing Aimbot Service claiming Copyright Infringement   
    Blizzard Entertainment have sued cheat developers in the past for copyright infringement and they've won on multiple occassions. When it comes to cheating in Blizzard games, the cheat developers have made a lot of money by selling various cheats/hacks for their titles. The issue is that companies are making money by selling cheats for a game which damages that IP as people don't like cheaters in games while also using that games' IP to advertise said cheats. I suspect the Fortnite publisher will win the lawsuit.
  11. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from ARikozuM in Fortnite Publisher suing Aimbot Service claiming Copyright Infringement   
    Blizzard Entertainment have sued cheat developers in the past for copyright infringement and they've won on multiple occassions. When it comes to cheating in Blizzard games, the cheat developers have made a lot of money by selling various cheats/hacks for their titles. The issue is that companies are making money by selling cheats for a game which damages that IP as people don't like cheaters in games while also using that games' IP to advertise said cheats. I suspect the Fortnite publisher will win the lawsuit.
  12. Funny
    Johners reacted to GoodBytes in Intel Launches its Next-Gen Intel Optane 900p SSD   
    Meh.. I'll wait for the 4K model. 900p is just not enough.
  13. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from gabrielcarvfer in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    Microsoft have today announced the Surface Book 2 which they're calling the most powerful Surface laptop yet.
    The update to the 8th generation of Intel processors is expected but a jump to the GTX 1050/1060, depending on the model you buy, is quite something. We've seen slim laptops, such as the Razer Blade 2017, pack a GTX 1060 into a very tidy design with the trade-off of little upgradability, something we already see on the Surface line-up. I also like that Microsoft are still including actual I/O on the device and while I respect Apple's decision to go with USB-C, the one cable to rule them all, it's a decision that's ahead of it's time.
    Surface devices have always played well with Windows and Office which is expected given that they make all three of them. As an owner of a Surface Pro 4 this is something I have experienced and it's nice. Microsoft haven't quite reach the "Apple level" in terms of hardware and software unification but they're getting which is nice to see.
    1080p games upscaled to a high resolution display is just like using an Xbox One S on a 4K TV, it's not really ideal. Given that the GTX 1050/1060, in a desktop, don't really push much beyond 1080p for modern titles, I don't imaging it'll be any better on a laptop even with DirectX 12 unless you're only playing Hearthstone or Minecraft.
    It'll be interesting to see how this moves forward. Photoshop was shown during the announcement of the Surface Studio and the Surface Dial so it'll be interesting to see the Surface hardware functionality can be implemented into software outside of Edge or Office programs. It's also worth noting that the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro has software specific implementations for a lot of programs, including Microsoft Office, that add an extra way to interface with the program.
     
    I'm interested to see how the Surface Book 2 actually holds up in a real world environment. I've had my Surface Pro 4 for a year but I'm looking to replace it with something newer as I want a device that's more like a traditional laptop and something that isn't a dual-core i5 with 4GB of RAM.
     
    POST UPDATE
     
    A big thanks go to the people at Windows Central who have an article that better outlines the full specification sheet for the Surface Book 2. The image below is said full spec sheet but first is information on the cooling, specifically the fans, within the upcoming devices.

     
    Hands On
     
    Source 1: https://blogs.windows.com/devices/2017/10/17/introducing-surface-book-2-the-most-powerful-surface-book-ever/
    Source 2: https://www.windowscentral.com/surface-book-2-tech-specs
  14. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  15. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  16. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  17. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  18. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  19. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Matu20 in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Install the tlp and tlp-rdw packages and you should get improvements in power management for better battery life and system performance. This should really be part of the baseline installation for laptops.
  20. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  21. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  22. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  23. Informative
    Johners reacted to GoodBytes in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    1. It wont' match the performance. But it s a Quad Core CPU U series which is faster than a Dual Core U series.
    2. Microsoft tend to do a very good to excellent job managing heat. They don't cheap out.  However, form factor is a limitation. So, will it throttle under in a warm room, and playing a demanding game for some time.. probably. But the CPU will follow.
  24. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from ElfenSky in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    I don't know if Microsoft do oversea shipping from the UK to mainland Europe when purchasing from the UK Microsoft Store. I hope it's not like the performance base for the existing surface book which took some time to become available outside of the US.
  25. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from ElfFriend in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    It's like any premium laptop, expensive and that applies to Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Razer or anybody else.
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