Jump to content

Johners

Member
  • Content count

    2,583
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from mr moose in Fortnite Publisher suing Aimbot Service claiming Copyright Infringement   
    Blizzard Entertainment have sued cheat developers in the past for copyright infringement and they've won on multiple occassions. When it comes to cheating in Blizzard games, the cheat developers have made a lot of money by selling various cheats/hacks for their titles. The issue is that companies are making money by selling cheats for a game which damages that IP as people don't like cheaters in games while also using that games' IP to advertise said cheats. I suspect the Fortnite publisher will win the lawsuit.
  2. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from mr moose in Fortnite Publisher suing Aimbot Service claiming Copyright Infringement   
    Blizzard Entertainment have sued cheat developers in the past for copyright infringement and they've won on multiple occassions. When it comes to cheating in Blizzard games, the cheat developers have made a lot of money by selling various cheats/hacks for their titles. The issue is that companies are making money by selling cheats for a game which damages that IP as people don't like cheaters in games while also using that games' IP to advertise said cheats. I suspect the Fortnite publisher will win the lawsuit.
  3. Funny
    Johners reacted to GoodBytes in Intel Launches its Next-Gen Intel Optane 900p SSD   
    Meh.. I'll wait for the 4K model. 900p is just not enough.
  4. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    Microsoft have today announced the Surface Book 2 which they're calling the most powerful Surface laptop yet.
    The update to the 8th generation of Intel processors is expected but a jump to the GTX 1050/1060, depending on the model you buy, is quite something. We've seen slim laptops, such as the Razer Blade 2017, pack a GTX 1060 into a very tidy design with the trade-off of little upgradability, something we already see on the Surface line-up. I also like that Microsoft are still including actual I/O on the device and while I respect Apple's decision to go with USB-C, the one cable to rule them all, it's a decision that's ahead of it's time.
    Surface devices have always played well with Windows and Office which is expected given that they make all three of them. As an owner of a Surface Pro 4 this is something I have experienced and it's nice. Microsoft haven't quite reach the "Apple level" in terms of hardware and software unification but they're getting which is nice to see.
    1080p games upscaled to a high resolution display is just like using an Xbox One S on a 4K TV, it's not really ideal. Given that the GTX 1050/1060, in a desktop, don't really push much beyond 1080p for modern titles, I don't imaging it'll be any better on a laptop even with DirectX 12 unless you're only playing Hearthstone or Minecraft.
    It'll be interesting to see how this moves forward. Photoshop was shown during the announcement of the Surface Studio and the Surface Dial so it'll be interesting to see the Surface hardware functionality can be implemented into software outside of Edge or Office programs. It's also worth noting that the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro has software specific implementations for a lot of programs, including Microsoft Office, that add an extra way to interface with the program.
     
    I'm interested to see how the Surface Book 2 actually holds up in a real world environment. I've had my Surface Pro 4 for a year but I'm looking to replace it with something newer as I want a device that's more like a traditional laptop and something that isn't a dual-core i5 with 4GB of RAM.
     
    POST UPDATE
     
    A big thanks go to the people at Windows Central who have an article that better outlines the full specification sheet for the Surface Book 2. The image below is said full spec sheet but first is information on the cooling, specifically the fans, within the upcoming devices.

     
    Hands On
     
    Source 1: https://blogs.windows.com/devices/2017/10/17/introducing-surface-book-2-the-most-powerful-surface-book-ever/
    Source 2: https://www.windowscentral.com/surface-book-2-tech-specs
  5. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  6. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  7. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  8. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  9. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  10. Like
    Johners got a reaction from Matu20 in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Install the tlp and tlp-rdw packages and you should get improvements in power management for better battery life and system performance. This should really be part of the baseline installation for laptops.
  11. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  12. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  13. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from Ryan_Vickers in Ubuntu 17.10 Is Now Available   
    Ubuntu 17.10, codenamed Artful Aardvark, is now available for download with a host of new features and updates to the popular free and open source operating system.
     
    Ubuntu 17.10 is a non-LTS (Long Term Support) release that will be supported for 9 months (July 2018) by Canonical. This follows their cycle of LTS releases having 5 years of support with non-LTS releases having 9 months of support. This is also the first releases of Ubuntu that will not have a 32-bit release. Please note that the 64-bit release will be a multi-arch release and will run 32-bit software.
     
    What's New [Video]
     
    From Unity to GNOME Shell
     
    Earlier this year it was announced by Canonical that Ubuntu Touch and Unity 8 were no longer projects that would be pursued and the major consequence of this was the plan to switch from the controversial Unity desktop environment to GNOME Shell. Existing versions of Unity did have a basis from GNOME with a lot of the default Ubuntu software being applications from the GNOME software ecosystem. Ubuntu 17.10 will feature a version of GNOME Shell that is skinned to look like Unity 7. This has been done by adding the application dock which defaults to being at the left side of the screen.
     

     
    The dock is both a task manager and an application launcher, similar to how the taskbar in Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 functions. You can pin applications which shows the icon plus it will also show the icon of any running applications. This dock is global which means it will show all open windows regardless of the workspace you are working in. There is also the ability to auto-hide the dock.
     
    GNOME Shell also allows for all open applications and workspaces to be viewed by pressing the Super Key (the Windows key) or by clicking the Activities button in the top-left of the screen. This provides a spread of all open applications in the middle alongside a list of all workspaces on the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The dotted-grid button at the bottom of the dock allows the user to see all applications that are installed onto the system. There are two tabs on this view, Frequent and All, which are pretty self-explanatory. The search box allows the user to search for an application but keyboard warriors can start typing when this view opens up and GNOME will initiate a search for you without having to click or tab into the search box.
     

     
    Ubuntu 17.10 still uses the Ambiance GTK theme and Ubuntu Mono Dark icon set which has been the default for quite some time now. A new theme might become a reality for Ubuntu 18.04, the next LTS release, but until then you can stick with the default or install a theme of your own onto the system. There is one noticeable change, the window control buttons have been moved from the left-side to the right-side of the screen.
     

     
    The settings app has received an updated which makes using it much nicer. However, the GNOME Tweak Tool hasn't been incorporated into the main system settings so to make some more in-depth changes to how GNOME Shell functions, another tool is required.
     

     
    One final change is the login/lock screen. LightDM has been replaced with GDM, GNOME Display Manager, as part of the change to GNOME Shell. The theme matches the rest of the system.
     
    Technical and Other Changes
    You can download Ubuntu 17.10 for your 64-bit desktop here.
     
    Source 1: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/ReleaseNotes
    Source 2: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/10/ubuntu-17-10-release-features
  14. Informative
    Johners reacted to GoodBytes in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    1. It wont' match the performance. But it s a Quad Core CPU U series which is faster than a Dual Core U series.
    2. Microsoft tend to do a very good to excellent job managing heat. They don't cheap out.  However, form factor is a limitation. So, will it throttle under in a warm room, and playing a demanding game for some time.. probably. But the CPU will follow.
  15. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from ElfenSky in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    I don't know if Microsoft do oversea shipping from the UK to mainland Europe when purchasing from the UK Microsoft Store. I hope it's not like the performance base for the existing surface book which took some time to become available outside of the US.
  16. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    It's like any premium laptop, expensive and that applies to Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Razer or anybody else.
  17. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    The video is focused around the 15" inch model so I assume the older CPUs will be in the cheaper/smaller models to keep prices lower?
  18. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    It's like any premium laptop, expensive and that applies to Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Razer or anybody else.
  19. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    It's like any premium laptop, expensive and that applies to Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Razer or anybody else.
  20. Informative
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    Microsoft have today announced the Surface Book 2 which they're calling the most powerful Surface laptop yet.
    The update to the 8th generation of Intel processors is expected but a jump to the GTX 1050/1060, depending on the model you buy, is quite something. We've seen slim laptops, such as the Razer Blade 2017, pack a GTX 1060 into a very tidy design with the trade-off of little upgradability, something we already see on the Surface line-up. I also like that Microsoft are still including actual I/O on the device and while I respect Apple's decision to go with USB-C, the one cable to rule them all, it's a decision that's ahead of it's time.
    Surface devices have always played well with Windows and Office which is expected given that they make all three of them. As an owner of a Surface Pro 4 this is something I have experienced and it's nice. Microsoft haven't quite reach the "Apple level" in terms of hardware and software unification but they're getting which is nice to see.
    1080p games upscaled to a high resolution display is just like using an Xbox One S on a 4K TV, it's not really ideal. Given that the GTX 1050/1060, in a desktop, don't really push much beyond 1080p for modern titles, I don't imaging it'll be any better on a laptop even with DirectX 12 unless you're only playing Hearthstone or Minecraft.
    It'll be interesting to see how this moves forward. Photoshop was shown during the announcement of the Surface Studio and the Surface Dial so it'll be interesting to see the Surface hardware functionality can be implemented into software outside of Edge or Office programs. It's also worth noting that the Touch Bar on the MacBook Pro has software specific implementations for a lot of programs, including Microsoft Office, that add an extra way to interface with the program.
     
    I'm interested to see how the Surface Book 2 actually holds up in a real world environment. I've had my Surface Pro 4 for a year but I'm looking to replace it with something newer as I want a device that's more like a traditional laptop and something that isn't a dual-core i5 with 4GB of RAM.
     
    POST UPDATE
     
    A big thanks go to the people at Windows Central who have an article that better outlines the full specification sheet for the Surface Book 2. The image below is said full spec sheet but first is information on the cooling, specifically the fans, within the upcoming devices.

     
    Hands On
     
    Source 1: https://blogs.windows.com/devices/2017/10/17/introducing-surface-book-2-the-most-powerful-surface-book-ever/
    Source 2: https://www.windowscentral.com/surface-book-2-tech-specs
  21. Like
    Johners got a reaction from GoodBytes in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    I've updated the original post to include a better breakdown of the hardware within both models of the upcoming Surface Book 2. I hope this helps everyone.
  22. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    The video is focused around the 15" inch model so I assume the older CPUs will be in the cheaper/smaller models to keep prices lower?
  23. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    It's like any premium laptop, expensive and that applies to Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Razer or anybody else.
  24. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from Dan Castellaneta in Introducing the Surface Book 2   
    It's like any premium laptop, expensive and that applies to Apple, Dell, Lenovo, Razer or anybody else.
  25. Agree
    Johners got a reaction from mr moose in Fortnite Publisher suing Aimbot Service claiming Copyright Infringement   
    Blizzard Entertainment have sued cheat developers in the past for copyright infringement and they've won on multiple occassions. When it comes to cheating in Blizzard games, the cheat developers have made a lot of money by selling various cheats/hacks for their titles. The issue is that companies are making money by selling cheats for a game which damages that IP as people don't like cheaters in games while also using that games' IP to advertise said cheats. I suspect the Fortnite publisher will win the lawsuit.
×