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Dave :)

Retired Staff
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  1. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  2. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  3. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  4. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  5. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  6. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  7. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  8. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from marten.aap2.0 in Worst Tech mistake you have ever made?   
    Tea and computers don't mix. :angry:
  9. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  10. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  11. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  12. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  13. Agree
    Dave :) got a reaction from Joelw2003 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    If you're on a budget ( less than $100 ) i would recommend the CM Quickfire TK.
  14. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  15. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from AZquickscooper99 in Mechanical Keyboard Club!   
    Hello all,
    Thought i should get in early and create a central hub for all us Keyboard enthusiasts to congregate.
    For those who don't know what a mechanical keyboard is, here is a quick, very brief outline.
     
    On a regular rubber dome keyboard, ones you generally find in Schools, work places etc, under each key is rubber dome. When pressed, this rubber dome is pressed down, making contact with the underlying membrane, transferring the electrical impulse through the circuitry and thus telling the computer what button has been pressed.
    A mechanical keyboard, on the otherhand, doesn't have such a set up. Instead, underneath each key is an individual switch. When pressed, this switch is forced down, connecting the contact and transferring electrical impulse. The advantages of using a mechanical switch are quite strong, firstly it provides a much more tactile and wholesome feedback, good for telling the user when they have actuated the key. This allows the user, when they have got used to it, to type at a much faster rate as they know the feeling of when they have typed a letter, and thus can increase their word count. Also, mechanical keyboards allow for NKRO, or N-key roll over. Basically this means that the user can press down as many keys as they like, the computer will register all the key strokes. With a membrane board, there is a limit.
    For a much more in depth talk, check out Linus' video on Mechanical keyboards.
    There are many, many switch variants out there. However the ones you are most likely to come across are: Cherry MX switches. These come in a variety of names, denoted by their colour. Each switch feels slightly different, and provides the user with different reasons to use a switch.

    Cherry MX Blues: Tactile, clicky. - Good for typing, not so much gaming.
    Cherry MX Browns: Tactile, non-clicky. - Good gaming and typing due to their quietness, but still maintaining the tactile feedback (you can feel a bump when you press the key)
    Cherry MX Reds: Linear, non-clicky - Good for gaming, similar to Membrane in linear motion; no bump as it's not tactile.
    Cherry MX Blacks : Linear, non-clicky. - Similar to MX Reds, slightly heavier

    There are many other variants of the Cherry MX line up, however these are the main constituents which filtrate into the mainstream market.

    Simply post what Keyboard you're running, what switch type, TKL or not, and any other mods you've done to it.
    Here is my Filco Majestouch 2 TKL:

  16. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  17. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  18. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  19. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  20. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  21. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  22. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from SilenceDoGood in How do you become part of the Moderating Team?   
    RIP @me 
  23. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  24. Funny
    Dave :) got a reaction from zootcake in How fast is the LTT member's internet connection?   
    Think i've won this:

  25. Like
    Dave :) got a reaction from SilenceDoGood in How do you become part of the Moderating Team?   
    RIP @me 
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